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June 01, 1939 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

(DAY, JUNE 1, 1939

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PiGE SEVEN

Michigan

Netters

Capture

Third Place In Conference

.

Tobin Takes
Finals Match
From O'Neil

Roberts Meets Death In Indianapolis Memorial Day CGlassic B acteriologi1sts Beat Economists
{.In Faculty Softball Finals, -65
By HERMAN EPSTEIN 1 berg (the Bactys claimed he was a
r~A big bad band of Bacteriologists j ringer) had served up. A homer tallied

Chical
Ten
Tak

go Retains Big
nis Title; Wi
e Second Pla
(Continued irom Piage 1)

STen
idcats
ce

cage in straight sets 6-1, 6-4. It was
the worst defeat suffered by Durst
this year, as the Chicagoan seemed
to find little trouble in the Wolver-
ine's play.
Chicago, which held a one point
lead over Northwestern going into
today's finals, rode roughshod over
the Wildcats to shut them out with-
out a single individual title.
Chet Murphy, Chicago ace, made
up for the defeat he suffered from
Marv Wachman, of Northwestern
early in the season, by downing him
7-5, 6-3. Wachman piled up a 5-2
lead over Murphy and seemed well
on his way to a victory, when the
Chicago ace suddenly came to life to
win nine straight games, and take
the match.
Fall In Semi-Finals
In the other matches of the tourna-
ment, John Kidwell, Capt. Don Per-
cival, and the doubles team of Steve
Woolsey and Sam Durst were the
only Michigan men to survive the
first round. However, none of them
survived the semi-finals.
Kidwell met up with John Froehl-
ing of Northwestern and lost 6-1, 86.
Chet Murphy, winner of the number
one bracket eliminated Percival, 6-2,
60, while the doubles team lost out
to Richards and Milne of Northwes-
tern.
Wildcats Fail
;Northwestern, the only team given
a chance to defeat the Maroons,
seemed to have an excellent chance to
carry out this task as today's matches
started. The Wildcats had placed as
many men in the finals as the Chica-
go team had, but were totally eclipsed
by the avalanche of Maroon victories.
INDIVIDUAL WINNERS
Number one: Chet Murphy, Chicago
Number two: Jim Tobin, Michigan.
Number three: Charlie Shostrum,
Chicago.
Number four: Art Jorgensen, Chi-
cago.
Number five: John Krietenstein,
Chicago.
Number six: Jim Atkins, Chicago.
DOUBLES
Number one: Chet Murphy, Bill
Murphy, Chicago.
Number two: Charlie Shostrum,
Art Jorgensen, Chicago.
Number three: John Krietenstein,
Jim Atkins, Chicago.
Coach Ray Fisher
Awards 14 Varsity
Letters To Squad
Fourteen members of the Wolverine
baseball team were awarded Varsity
letters and six more were given re-
serve numerals, it was announced by
Coach Ray Fisher following the final
wine of the year with Michigani
State.
The list included: Capt. Walter S.
Peckinpaugh, East Cleveland, O.;1
pitchers Daniel Smick, Hazel Park;
Jack G. Barry, Katonah, N.Y.; Lyle,
W. Bond, Clare; and Russell T. Dob-
son, Ann Arbor; catchers Leo C.1
Beebe, Dearborn; and Forest Eva-
shevski, Detroit; infielders Elmer J.-
Gedeon, Cleveland; Irvin Lisagor,
Chicago; Michael Sofiak, Gary, Ind.,
and Earl J. Smith, Ann Arbor; out-1
fielders Charles A. Pink, Detroit; Fred
E. Trosko, Flint; and William J.
Steppon, Detroit
INumeral awards went to the fol-
lowing Varsity reserves: George I
Auehle, Detroit; Howard Greenberg,
Dayton, Ohio; Maynard G. Stoddard,
Davison; Lester E. Veigel, Tuscara-
was, Ohio; Charles E. O'Brien, Dear-
born; and Ralph E. Bittinger, De-
troit.
M CLUB BANQUET
The M Club banquet will be held]
at 6 p.m. today at the Union. ]
Dye Hogan, President.

*

tallied a run in the last of the seventh
to take the departmental softball
title from the Economics department
by a 6-5 score yesterday. With two
out, and a man on third, an error by
the Ec shortstop let the winning run
across.
The game was bitterly fought all
the way through with the first bit
of dissension coming at the start of
the game when an enraged microbe-
hunter demanded to know who called
him up the night before and inquired
in a milk-and-honey voice whether
the Bacty team would dare to show
up.
Quarrel Is Averted
A quarrel was averted, and the
game commenced.
Sarracino, the bacteria boys' pitch-
er, threw a few balls before the next
argument arose when a suspicious
economist asked the umpire to take
a look to see if the Bactys hadn't
substituted a microbe for the ball.
Investigation proved this charge to
be false though the Ecs claimed theft
the microbe died in the heat of the
argument.
Colberg Is Ringer
The game proceeded rather swiftly
to the second inning, when the finan-
cial wizards made up for the home
run ball their pitcher, Marshall Col-

11

I.I

the first run, and the second came
in when the shortstop was unable to
leap high enough to catch the ball
being thrown (so they say) back to
the pitcher by the catcher.

I

The flaming car pictured above is that of Bob Swanson as it hung on the outside rail of the Indianapolis
Speedway following Saturday's accident which cost the life of Floyd Roberts and seriously injured Chet Miller,
Detroit driver. Miller's heroism in swerving to avoid the inert body of Swanson, which lay exposed on the
track, was the dramatic highlight of the Classic's 27th running. Wilbur Shaw, veteran driver from Indian-
apolis, won a large share of the lap money and also first place money with his average of 115.035 miles per hour.

.Ex- Wolverine Baseball Player
prnvoP l T n .-e C,"I fno 11,m Fvi

5. 1l'L'u..OJ NNi thus C
By ART HILL
If you walk into the locker room
at Yost Field House about 20 minutes
before a varsity baseball game is
scheduled to begin, you will probably
see a couple of average looking
gentlemen attiring themselves in dark
blue uniforms which might be mis-
taken for conservative business suits.
Then, you notice a mask and wind-
pad lying on the floor nearby and
you realize that these gents are just
a couple of guessers relaxing before
the game. You hover nonchalantly
about the room, half expecting one
of them to say "I think I'll call all
the close ones strikes today," or some-
thing along that line.
Discusses Yank Pace
But the first words you hear are
"Boy, those Yankees are sure burning
up the American League, aren't
they?"
"Why, these guys sound just like
normal human beings," you say to
yourself. So you walk up to one of
them and ask his name. "Bob Knode,"
he says.
"Is umpiringthe only way you can
keep body and soul together?" you
ask.
"No, I like it," is the prompt reply.
You are a bit taken back by this but
you carry on.
Played With Indians
It soon develops that our friend
Knode graduated in 1923 from Michi-
gan where he played first base for
the Wolverines. Subsequently, he saw
five years of service with the Cleve-
land Indians.
After a couple of years in the min-
ors, he decided to give up professional
baseball and became an ump. He's
been calling them for several years
now, and he also handles football in
the fall and basketball in the winter.
Crowds Have Little Effect
Asked whether the crowds ever
bother an ump, Bob replies "Not very
much. You see, when we call one
wrong, no one knows it better than
we do. We take pride in our work
just as the players do. If we're
wrong, we feel badly about it and if
we're right, we don't care what the
crowd thinks."

Then you wonder what Bob thinks
of the Michigan players. You find
out that he thinks big Elmer Gedeon i
is the most improved player on the
team and that, if he keeps on at his
present rate, he has a fine chance to
make the grade in the majors.

ATTENTION STUDENTS
LET US HANDLE YOUR PERSONAL EFFECTS
FREE PICK-UP and DELIVERY
Service to all principal cities
Service to all foreign countries
For further information call
7102
Universal Corlooding& Distributing Co.

U
=

SUMMER

sports 'kWear

* "SKIPPER" SPORT SHIRTS
$1.00 - $1.50 - $2.00
* TENNIS SHORTS... $1.50 & $2.00
* SHIRT & TROUSER ENSEMBLES
$2.95 to $5.00
* SPORT COATS ... $12.50 and up
* SPORT JACKETS... $4.50 and up

* COTTON

SLACKS . . . $1.75

to $3.50

*r PALM BEACH SLACKS... $4.75
* PALM BEACH SUITS

DRE S S
PARADE
THE NEW BALM BEACH SUITS are marching
across the summer scene. Shadow Stripes, some-
thing decidedly new in lightweight town and
country suitings . . . Airtones, in the smartest
tans, blues and grays you've ever seen . . . jute
and Wicker, off-white, off-tan color hits of the
season . . . and a new Palm Beach white. The
best place to see them is from our grandstand .. .
the prices will be music to your ears.

11

* TROPICAL WORSTEDS

* STR AW HATS

Stadel & Walker

FIRST NATIONAL BUILDING

205 SOUTH MAIN

1

WEATHER FORECAST:

A

BASEBALL'S BIG SIX

Player, Club G
Campbell, Indians .21
Arnovich, Phillies .37
Foxx, Red Sox . . .28
Dickey, Yankees . .35
Hassett, Bees .....32
J. Martin, Cards . .27

Ab
64
142
103
127
108
91

R
16
23
26
35
12
21

H
25
53
37
45
38
32

Pct.
.391
.373
.363
.354
.352
.352

HOT?

-. - - -. - ~- -U
- - - - -

1

'W- -1-1-W Iv- Iv-

There's pleasant cool weather ahead for
the men attired in Summer tropicals. Air

TA 1 L O R ED BY G O O D A L L

[1-

Try Our Tastier Meals!
EVENING MEALS 5-7
* We serve a hot, appetising supper including
meat, potatoes, a vegetable, beverage and
dessert.
NOON-DAY SNACKS 11-12
* We serve hot plate lunches and a delicious
assortment of sandwiches eaten with a milk
shake, soda, or sundae. You'll feel fit to do

conditioned

fabrics by STEIN - BLOCH.

This means Ease- Coolness- Good

Appearance- and Comfort.

$15 .50

$22.50 and up
( Others at $15. )

I

I -

I I 1 111 11I

I

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