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May 19, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY

I

THE MCHIGA DAIL

'24

Kiss The Boys'. iast
Attends Ann Arbor Ploy

Rulers Arrive Following Delay At Sea

Sixteen members of the cast of
"Kiss the Boys Good-Bye," now play-
ing at the Cass Theatre in Detroit'
attended este 7dcay's matinee of "No
War in Troy!", opening presentation
of 1939 Dramatic Season, starring
Philip Merivale.
The cast has been on tour of 'the
larger cities since Christmas, when
the play closed in Chicago.
Season tickets for the Season's five
plays may be purchased only two
more 'days, Mrs. Lucille Walz, promo-
tion manager, said yesterday,'adding
that good seats are still available."
Tong Oil Crown
To Be Awarded
Sigma Rho Tat j Honors
Faculty Demosth enes
Staid engineering "cllege faculty
members are brushing up on their
powers of oratory .and are delving
secretly into worn copies of Demos-
thenes these days preparing to com-
pete for Sigma Rho Tau's annual
Tung Oil crown to be awarded at the
debating society's dinner Tuesday in
the Union.-
According to long custom, 10 pro-
fessors are called on by club members
to give impromptu talks on subjects
suggested by the students. Awarded
to the best speaker will be a crown
of tuni oil blossoms presented by the
last year's winner, Prof. Edward T.
Vincent"of the engineering mechanics
department.
Professor Vincent' will receive a,
bronze stump, the symbol of the or-
ganization. The" stump, which is
awarded each year to' 'the winner of
the previous year's crown, is engraved
with the name of the winner and the
legend of the Tung Oil Crown.
Varsity Glee Club Elects
Officers For Next Year
Colvin L. Gibson, '40,'was elected
president of the Varsity Glee Club at
the Union last night. Other officers
chosen are: Kenneth A. Heinneger,
'40, vice-president, -Charles M. Brown,
'41E, secretary, and James E. Fromm,
'41E, treasurer.
Outgoing officers are Hugh 0.
Roberts, '39, president; Carl A.
Viehe; '39, business manager, and
Hatley O. Spencer, secretary.

Former 1Swingouts' Featured
Class Rivalry And Street Fights
By ROY BUEHLER wrapped in such a delightfully con-
Intense class rivalry, street fights fusing mantle of uncertainty that we
and the "real college spirit" made shall regret it deeply when some
Swingout a classic event in the early malevolent genius with a perfect
1 days of its history, according to the memory shall rise up and confront us
stories several professors on campus with facts.".
tell. The event was abolished in 1934,
Thie "Classic" began about 1870, when everything was at a low ebb, but
Prof. Fred B. Wahr, of the German the force pf tradition.lingered,and
department, discovered in a recent Swingout became a feature of the
study, when the senior class first senor celebration agai n 1937.
marched around campus, then went Having lost much of its former+
to a church for worship services and glamor, Swingout has come to ,be
finally'broke up with street fights be- merely the first time that seniors don
tween the various schools, especially academic costume and visibly declare
the "Engins" and the "Laws." themselves as "The Senior Class." I
Lantern Night, in those days, was -
held on the same night with Swing- en-e
out. Prof. A. D. Moore, of the 'en- 1U -Lleu ts I
gineering college, explained that Lan- , l M- .
tern Night started "When it became ' ('r t1
too dark to swing at the enemy, and
the survivors got lanterns and went Ten student members of the Amer-
out to salvage the wounded and, to ican Institute of Chemical Engineers

i

Ninth Graders
Mailmen Meet
On a good will tour, 360 ninth
grade students from Ann Arbor's three
public junior high schools visited
Windsor, Ont., yesterday, in company
with 25 of their teachers in 10 large
buses.
Going over on the bridge and re-
turning through the tunnel, the stu-
dents were welcomed by a police
encort with which they toured, the
city. Later they were addressed by
the American consul in Windsor and
by a member of the Canadian Royal
Mounted Police.
* *' *
First of its kind to be held in Ann
Arbor in 16 years, the 40th annual
convention of the Michigan State
Association of Letter Carriers will
convene here Friday and Saturday,
May 25 and 26, with several hundred
mailmen and their wives attendin.
A parade, luncheon programs and
entertainment are being planned for
the postmen, who will make their
headquarters the Union. A special
program is being arranged for their
wives, with the Ladies Auxiliary of
the Ann Arbor branch acting as
hostesses.
* * *
Sheriff Jacob B. Andres has issued
a warning to all motor boat operators
in Washtenaw County to the effect
that state law requires all motor'
boats be equipped with underwater
exhausts and that no cut-outs be
used. This law applies to students
also, he insisted 'vehemently.
EK. W. CLARK
English Boot and Shoe Maker
" Our new repair department, the
best in the city. Prices are right, i
438 South State and Factory on
South Forest Avenue.

Bing George VI and Queen Elizabeth are shown here at the rail of
their ship as they neared Quebec for the first visit a British monarch
has ever made to AinerIca. The ship, the Empress of Australia, was
delayed two days at sea by fog and ice.
* * * *
istorye Department Presents
Varied Views On Rulers Vist

By HERVIE HAUFLER
England's King George VI and
Queen Elizabeth have arrived on
North American soil, the first British
monarchs to journey here, and ex-
planations of the visit by faculty;
members in the history department
range from that of a royal pleasure
cruisento matters of profound world
portent.
Prof. Arthur L. Cross points out
that the King and Queen were invited
to visit America, and specifically to
tour the New York World's' Fair. The
usual British response to an Ameri-
can invitation has been to send a
prince. The Duke of Windsor, then
Prince of Wales, and Prince Edward,
later Edward VII, have toured here
as good-will ambassadors of Eng-
land, Professor Cross explained.
'Friendly, Good-Will. Tour'
There is a 'danger, Professor Cross
believes, of reading too deep a mean-
ing into what in normal times might
well 'be merely a friendly good-will
tour. However, the journey of Queen
Victoria to receive the title "Empress
of India," he admits, undoubtedly
stimulated India's patriotism to the
British Empire.
Rumors that the royal couple left
England because of the imminence
of Eurbpean war are called false by
Professor Cross. Monarchs have : a
heritage of being calm in the face of
peril; he explains, and the British
rulers would: encourage their sub-

jects' morale rather- than flee from
danger.
Several professors emphasised the
loose organization of the British Em-
pire as an important reason for the'
rulers' trip. Technically each domin-
ion can decide whether or not to aid
the' mother country in event of war.
Thie union is becoming more and
more one of good-will and economic
relations, and the monarchs' visit
serves as mortar to help in keeping
the structure together.
French-Canadian Problem
The French settlers in Canada offer
a particularly knotty problem in keep-
ing that dominion favorable to Eng-
land. French settlers demand a
measure of autonomy, including the
right to speak their own language,
and are not enthusiastic in backing
England's policies. The royal visit
may serve to impress the French-'
Canadians and swing them toward
a closer cooperation with England.
Prof. Dwight L. Dumond points out
that the British spent great sums in
introducing Edward, Prince of Wales,
to the world, only to have him abdi-
cate after a few months as King Ed-
ward VIII. King George, however,
did not travel widely as a prince and
consequently does not as yet have the
full sympathies of his subjects.
Still another rumor which has been
voiced is that the monarchs may be
surveying the possibilties of a new
seat f'r the British Empire, a capital
to replace London, extremely valner-
able to air attack.
All professors who were interviewed
agreed that the rulers' visit to the
United States may be designed as an
important step in the British drive to
swing American support behind Eng-
land and France.

bury the dead."
A great dispute still rages over the
origin of the use of caps and gowns
at Swingout. Prof. Edwin C. God-
dard, of the Law School, believes
there were no caps and gowns until
long after 1889; but Prof. Arthur L.
Cross, of the history department, says
they were here when he came in 1890.
Professor Moore, an authority on
Swingout, said, "the origin has been
Band To Give
Top' Conert
Modern Music Will Feature
Tuesday's Program .
The classics will give' way to music
of a more popular variety next Tues-
day evening when the University Con-
cert band presents a free concert of
modern American music in Hill Audi-
torium, featuring a symphonic ar-
rangement of "Deep Purple" in its en-
tirety.
In addition to "Deep Purple," the
Band Concert will offer David Ben-
nett, Jr., who will play a modern
piano solo "Repartee." The selection
was written by Mr. Bennett's father,
David Bennett, Sr., composer and
arranger of band music. Grisselle's
"Nocturne," and the better known
of his "Two American Sketches,"
which won the Victor Record Com-
pany's prize for the best modern
American Composition, will also be
included.

are attending the two-day regional
meeting of the organization at Akron,
which closes today.,
The University's delegation to the
meeting is headed by Walton Rodger,
'39E, president of thelocal. chapter,
and is accompanied by Prof. D. L.
Katz, faculty adviser to the chapter.
The students making the trip are:
Harry Fischer, '40E, Kenneth Hard-
ing, '40E, Doug Hayes, '40BAd, Steph-
en Jones, '39E, Howard Passmore,
Grad., Randall Reynolds, '39E, and
Charles Weinaug, '39g.
Luiicheon Club To Picnic
Twenty members of Dean Bursley's
Luncheon Club will meetat 3:30 p.m.!
Sunday at the ;.Union, and from there
will go to Loch Alpine for a picnic
supper. William Comstock III, '42,
and William Langford, '42, are co-
,hairmen.

r!

A-

1

11

Classiffrd Directory

I,

A descriptive phantasy illustrating
Sday in the life of a soldier and based
upon the song, "There's Something
About A Soldier" will complete the
program.

: .
;.%,
.'
:
_

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COUNSELLOR for 4. boys age 7 for
summer at lake cottage 100 miles
from' Ann Arbor. Must have initia-
tive, imagination and understand-
ing of children. Good swimmer es-
sential. Capable of complete direc-
tion. Good salary. Qualified parent
or parents' bringing boy 7 or child
4' or both welcome arran'gement.
Box 1. 682

I

I

U

Student

Will Tour

LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darn
Careful work at lew prices.
ATRIAL WILL PRQVE-Shirts 14
Ace Laundry, 1114 5. University.
6
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Medical books; instr
-ments and .office equipment of t
late Dr. Thomas W. Paton of 1
Normal St.; Ypsilanti, Mich. 6
FOR ,SALE-Regulation tennis o'
fords 98c. Whites and blues wit
smooth rubber soles. R and S Sh
Store, 108 S. Main Street. 6:

ed.
9
4c.
69
'u-
he
22
79.
-
th
oe
22

European Nations
On Bicycling Trip
War-scares mean nothing to ad-
venturous Robert Vandenberg, '40,
who is going to take a three-months
cycling and hiking trip through Hol-
land, Germany, Switzerland, France
and Belgium, stopping at hostels in
Europe, managed by the American
Youth Hostel Organization.
Vandenberg, who is a French and
Spanish major, will sail on the Vo-
lendam, which leaves New York July
1. His itinerary includes Rotterdam,
Amsterdam, Cologne, Frankfort, Hei-
delberg, Rothenburg, Nuremberg, Mu-
nich, Oberammergau, Lake Con-
stance, Rhine River, Lucerne, Geneva,
Paris, Brussels and Antwerp. After
the hosteling trip, which will end late
in August, Vandenberg will remain in
Europe for a few weeks.

FOR SALE-C6mpiete tuxedo - in
good- condition, medium size. Price
$15. -1184 ' "673
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND. and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company. Phone 7112. 17

CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, .512- S.
Main. ' ' 311

HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
painting. Budget plan if desired.
Dial 7209. 181

-1

I
i
i

LAW
SCHOOL
FO UNDED 1899
AN,
ACCREDIT'ED.
LAW SCHOOL
TEXT and CASE
METHOD
"
For Catalog, recom-
mended list of pre-legal
subjects, and booklet,
"Stvrdyof Law and Proper
Preparation" address:
Edward T. Lee Dean.

I

COURSES
(40 weeks peryear)
Afternoon-3s years
Sdays...4:30-6:30
Evening - 4 years
Mon., Wed., Fri.,
6:30-9:20
~Postgraduate
Iyeor..twiceaweek
Practice courses
exclusively.
All courses lead
to degrees.
Two years' college
work required for
entrance.
New classes form
in Sept. and Feb.

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT-A Mass-
achusetts Corporation offers em-
ployment during July and August
to a few college students. Appli-
cant must be capable of lecturing
to small groups of ladies. Car help-
ful but 'not necessary. Write stat-
ing qualifications. Stanley, Inc., 43
Arnold St.,'Westfield, Mass. At-
tention F. S.Beveridge, Pres. .602

H EYWOOD
DARING, HUMOROUS, SATIRICAL,
HE IS CHARACTERIZED AS ONE OF
AMERICA'S MOST INTERESTING 9
WRITERS... IN MIS COLUMN
"IT SEEMS TO ME / YOQu WILL
FIND A VARIETY AND
FRESHNESS OF STYLE
UNUSUAL IN A COLUMNIST.

rs

THE JOHN MARSHALL

I""'

WORK-One hour daily toward
board. Summer or 'Fall term, mod-
erate rates. Clean pleasant rooms.
Ist class home cooking. Open to
Residents of 523 Packard. 683

l

315 Plymouth Ct., Chicago, Ill.
DANCING
j-Armory -
Auspices of Company K,
TONIGHT and I
SaturdayQ

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RtN NG 1,IROUGH A SEIES OF
ED TORIAL JOBS HIS NATURAL
NDOLENCE IN REVIEWING BOOKS
S '"' --lTURNED HIM. INTO A COLUMNIWT

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TYPEWRITERS
ALL MAKES. Office
( and Portable models,
bought, sold, rented,

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AMUSING, PENETRATING, CRITICAL COLUMNS by
HYWOD. BROUN

'

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m'WW" I ~ : X111 . IDIII

11111

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