100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OF

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUND~AY, AL 7, 1919

,. r

PRESS PASSES
By BUD BENJAMIN
The Swan Song.
rHIISIS the column I have never anticipated writing. It's the piece that
dampens the inspiration, that induces a sentimental gush bordering
on the maudlin, that promotes the down-in-the-mouth feeling which those
liver pills are supposed to cure.
From the time three and one-half years ago that I bolted an after-
neon class to enter the intriguing set of Maynard Street until today,
college has been a strange conglommeration of academic pursuits and
journalistic efforts. Neglect toward the former has increased pro-
gressively due to the mounting responsibilities of the latter, but there
has never been a qualm or a doubt in my mind as to the feasibility .of
my course.
The Michigan Daily has meant more to me than any phase of my
college life. It has been the very crux of my intellectual, social, and extra-
curricular endeavors. Three and a half years of plodding between the
Building and the Field House have flattened my arches, made me aware
that Ann Arbor has a bus line, and turned me into an inveterate bicyclist,
but these aspects of the grind seem exceedingly obscure today.
* * *
W HEN I step up to the first tee of the University golf course tomorrow
afternoon, it will be with mixed emotions. No more worries about Glump
versus Hinchmeyer in the high hurdles; who the hell cares whether Goofus
has a sore arm; the new football rules can go to pot; if the headlines are
putrid Tuesday morning-so what.
When I hit that wicked slice on number one and dub my brassie on
the second shot, there will be a continuing panorama of past events de-
stroying my concentration and turning my usual par sevens into eights.
*,. *
THE AFTERNOON three and a half years ago that I drove Ray Court-
right and 10 unknown freshman football prospects batty with my ques-
tions about the new blocking machine they were using. My first Daily story.
The time Pete Lisagor called up and told me to change his name from
Irvin to Pete in the freshman baseball story. Insolent dog, I thought. One
yeWr later I realized that this same Lisagor was leading a dual existence-a
top-notch sports editor in his sophomore year named Irvin, a good baseball
player on the side named Pete. His insolence proved to be a subtle form
of modesty.
The Conference track meet of 1937 at Columbus where som wise
guy poured a bottle of rye down my throat after I had been sipping
scotch. The horrible mixture almost killed me, gave me a free ticket
back to Ann Arbor in a rumble seat, and made me an anti-saloon league
member for a week.
The night Johnny Mitchell dragged me out of a dance emporium by
the feet and threw me into a taxi.
The WMBC sports broadcast with Butch Jordan and Cliff Keen. Three
men around a table waiting tensely for the red light to flash signalling "on
the air." It flashed. "Chrissakes," whimpered Jordan, "what do I do now."
The night Cappy Cappon's ear froze up en route to East Lansing
when we were going to scout Michigan State's basketball team. It was
on this night that I really learned to distinguish a phony from a real
guy, thanks to one of the latter, the rotund Mr. Cappon.
Fritz Crisler's first press Conference when the wise guy with the Leica
got an angle and fired candid shots for half an hour as fast as he could
load. Fifteen newshawks popping questions. Crisler's superb poise.
Johnny Gee's insulting letter which gave this column more campus
publicity than any pice I penned all year.
The afternoon Pete T1enney called and told me I was the new
sportseditor. lot towels dlpping water down my back, moist eyes.
The utterly asinine attitude of University authorities on football subsi-
dization which time alone will prove ridiculous.
The biggest disappointment of the year when an enlightened group on
campus sought to air their views on the aforementioned subject and were
stifled at deadline time.
The hunrteds of glorious blil sessions Ii the coehes' office on
everything from technical football to the problem of choosing the
right wife.
Fielding H. Yost's telephone call thanking me for the birthday piece.
One of the true thrills.
Phil Woodworth's attempt to sew up a Kitty Davis doll for a Phi Delt
house party when we camped overnight in Chi en route to Minnesota.
The night Johnny Mariucci almost took a smack at Eddie Lowrey. One
of the unpleasant moments.
The time that Fred Janke, Bill Reed, Mitch, and myself ran out of
dough at the Alenel, donned apons, and sold beer for our board.
These and a myriad of other memoirs pass on and on.
* * *
WRITING this column has been at times a rare privilege, on occasion an
extremely odious task. Inspiration often ran low; at times ideas were
in abundance. Most of these pieces have been ordinary; a few have been
good; some have stunk so badly I was ashamed of my name at the top.
This job of sports editor is no bed of roses. It takes a terrific amount
of time. But the time spent at this job, although it has taken us away
from the campus social-the coke dates, the afternoon teas; the maa-
thon dances, and the bridge games-will never be regretted.
It has taken us to Columbus, the goofiest, dizziest sports inferno in
the country, for a track meet and a football game. The Minneapolis trip,
where Earl Brenn had the audacity to sing "The Victors" on University

Avenue during a pep rally. New Haven and the Yale game-with the gorgeous
gals, the blase collegians; and the New York night life. Florida on my own
hook and an idea of how the other half lives. Chicago for the indoor track
meet. Detroit for Harry Wismer's Book Casino shows&.-all grand trips and
worth the triple cuts.
TD MY SUCCESSOR:-You need little advice. Don't worry about yourt
column unless no one tells you it reeks. Then beware. People aren't even
reading. Don't be a yes man. Don't eat up the baloney that supposed
"friends" dish out. Be fair. Be tough. Be objective. Make sure of your facts
interuret them as you see fit, and tell the sensitive souls to go to hell.
To my junior staff, who made this page whatever it happened to be:-
For your cooperation, for your loyalty, for your initiative-all thanks.
* - * *
JF THERE is but one thought I'd like to leave it is this. This position has
taught me a fundamental rule. The human race is a strange lot-?
complex mixture of personalities, cultures, mores, traits, and eccentricities.
To categorize an individual into a group is an inane attempt to generalize
the specific. This year has proved to me that all athletes are not tramps;
that all football players are not idiots; that all coaches are not character
builders; and that all journalists are not worthy of the name. The obvious
implication might well be broadened. In this column, I have sought to treat
my subjects as individuals, realizing that no two of them were alike. I shall
never forget this concept. Call a rotter a rotter and a prince a prince, no
matter how high his category nor how low his station in life. So long.

Barry Hurls Three Hit Triumph Over Illini

Illinois Drops
Second Game
To Varsity, 4{-1
Walt Peckinpaugh's Triple
In Sixth Gives Michigan,
Clean Sweep Of Series
(Continued from Page 1)
in this race before three-quarters of
the first lap had been completed
when Harvey Clarke went down on
the final turn as Bcwerly Boyle, run-
ning for Indiana, attempted to pass
him on the inside. Clarke finished
his lap 25-yards back of Boyle after
regaining his feet.
Relay A Thriller
Jack Leutritz cut the deficit to 15-
yards and Doug Hayes almost com-
pleted the job as he handed the
baton to anchor-man Ross Faulkner
only two strides behind the Hoosiers'
Jenkins. Ross passed anchor-man
Burnett on the back-stretch as the
crowd roared and the victory was
finally won by 10-yards.
Capt. Bill Watson, competing in
three events, won three events to
take down his usual high point scor-
ng honors for the day. His discus
throw of 153 ft. 91/ in. established
a new dual meet record. Bill took it
easy in the shot put, winning with 50
ft. 101/ in., and he annexed the
broad jump with a leap of 22 ft. 71/
in.
Elmner Gedeon, anxious to get to his
first base duties, stopped off long
enough to tie the dual meet record
of :14.2 in the 120-yard high hurdles.
It Was Gedeon's first outdoor starts
and after the first hurdle the final
result was never in doubt. Stan
Kelley and Sherm Olmsted gave the
Wolverines a clean sweep in this
event.

Davey O'Brien Joins Yost Celebration

Ii

1 Another Three
Michigan-4 AB
Pink. cf ..............4
Sofiak, ss...........3
Peckinpaugh, 3b.....4
Gedeon, lb.........4
Trosko, If ............4
Smick, rf ............3
Lisagor, 2b....... 3
Beebe, c............3
Barry, p............ 2
Totals -- - . ... ..30
Illinois- AB
Cavallo, 2b ..........2
Drechsler, if ......... 2
Hapac, cf ............4
Drish, rf ............3
McConnell, c........3
Ziemba, lb ..........4
Pyrz, ss .............4

-Hitter

_i

I

Here's A Boy Whose
Blea" Meant An Assist

aR
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

H
2
1
2
0
0
0
1
1

0
2
1
2
12
2
1
1
6
0

A
0
2
2
1
0
1
1
1

WORCESTER, Mass., May 6.-(AP)
--Mike Klarnick, Holy Cross pitcher,
hoisted a high fly to the Colgate
center fielder, Ken Murphy, in their
game here today. Murphy poised to
catch it, but the ball missed his glove
and landed square on the top of his

4 9 27

R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

H
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

O
1
3
1
3
4
11
1
0
0
0
0

Vitacco, 3b
Tyler, 3b
Grant, p ...
*Farrington

2 0
. .. . . .. ...1 0
...... .. 3 0
.. . .. .1 0

-head.
11 The ball bounced from Murphy's
A head a good 20 feet into the air. Col
Agate left fielder. Bill Bartlett sprint-
1 ed and caught the ball on the bounce
from Murphy's head for the putout.
1
,1 For..
4 CONVENIENCFE
2
0 ECONOMY
30 COMFORT
-- Select...
14
YELL-0-BLUE CAFE
1
4 Health Grade 95
ase
es: 2 Meals for 3.27
ts:
By 6 Regular Lunches
6 Regular Dinners
°I SPECIAL

This picture was Taken at the Yost birthday party in Fort Worth,
Texas, April 29. Pictured from left to right are James E. Forrest, a 230
pounder, who was a member of Yost's point a minute team of 1901
which played in the first Rose Bowl game. Today he is an insurance
man in Dallas. The little gent in the center is 150 pound Davey O'Brien,
Texas Christian's famed all-American quarterback of 1938. On the
right is Albert Benbroke, who tips the beams at 295 pounds, a Wolver-
ine all-American guard of 1909 and one of the original Michigan
blocks of granite. Today he's a Dallas business man.
Johnstown Is Derby Wtunier

Totals ...........29 1
*Batted for Vitacco in 7th.
Illinois .............000 000
Michigan..........000 002
Errors: Trosko, Lisagor.
hit: Peckinpaugh. Stolen
Drechsler, Pink. Sacrifice
Drechsler 2, Barry. Struck
Barry 5, by Grant 3.

3 24
100
02x
3 ba
base
hit
out:

Bases on balls: of Barry 3,+
Grant 1. Hit by pitcher: by Ba
(McConnel). Left on bases: Illin
7, Michigan 4. Umpires: Brann
and Walsh.

rry
OIS1
ick

(Continued from Page 1)

Stout said his only moment of un- i -

easiness came when they were round- Johnstown a playful pat as he passed,
ing the first turn, clinging to the (and it nearly scared Stout out of his
rail Som ofthe rowd ;wich ad boots. He instantly jerked the horse
rail. Some of the crowd, which had further out on the track and there-
poured into the infield, rcached out after kept him well away from the
over the railing as though to give f celebrants.
1,

T-BONE STEAK
or 1/4 CHICKEN 5 c
including full course dinner
Daily Lunches... 30c
Doily.Dinners ... 35c
3141/2 SOUTH STATE STREET
Across from Kresge's

1

I I

A

1-

I

A aumnmer'e
«. round-trp to
traveling Tourist Class on A
sailing MAY 31, JUNE 2 so

merica's greatest liners
itling JUNE~14 JULY 12

I

I

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan