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April 30, 1939 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-04-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGF THFFF

SUNDY, PRIL30,193 I'A~E HRI

Baseball Team

Trounces

rish,

9-

Smick Pitches
Two-it Game
For Easy Win
Michigan Reverses iForm;
Nardone Garners Only
Two Notre Dame Hits
(Continued from Page 1)
bunt which rolled in front of the
plate and stopped dead, and when
catcher Augie Verhoestra heaved wild-
ly into right field, Charley scampered
all the way to third. He scored on
Sofiak's pop single down the right
field line.
The Wolverines added another in
the seventh. Pete Lisagor singled be-
'ind second, and Smick lined a triple
to center field, a shoe-string attempt
by Nardone missing connections.
Notre Dame's only run in the
eighth was unearned. Peckinpaugh,
who had played a brilliant defensive
game, bobbled Nardone's ground ball
to open the inning. Pinch-hitter Bob
Behe was hit by a pitched ball mov-
ing Nardone to second from where he
scored on two long flies by Chester
Sullivan and Ray Pinelli.
The Wolverines batted around in
their half of the inning. Sofiak got
a "life" when third baseman Sulli-
van committed his fourth error. Peck-
inpaugh bunted and when Mandjiak
ill-advisedly cut off Sullivan's throw,
Sofiak moved all the way to the un-
guarded base.
Gedeon singled, and Trosko walked,
but Steppon lined into a double play,
Sullivan unassisted. Gedeon was al-
most trapped at second on the play
for a near triple killing.
But the rally did not die. Lisagor
singled behind second again, and
Leo Beebe got a double when Red
Oberbrunner misplayed his long drive
to left. Smick singled home the fift
run, moved to second on a wild pitch,
and completed the scoring when Hy-
mie Crane kicked Pink's ground ball
at second base.
Smick breezed through the ninth
in order to end the afternoon's en-
tertainment.
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COMPANY

PRESS PASSES
By BUD BENJAMIN
L I NOE: e column for the next six(lays will be written by junior
applicants for the sports edtorshIp next year. Today's article is written by Mel
Fineberg
Crazy Over Horses, Horses .
There is a quaint custom in Louisville every May when the citizens
of the city forget the sharecroppers, the TVA and the depression for the
express pleasure of watching some 100,000 maniacs shout themselves hoarse
while some horses run for a few seconds more than two minutes.
It is a rather nice custom, many people say with a palpable jerkl
in their voices, and for its enjoyment they would drop all business
activities, love-making and two stitches. And so they stop a day to
watch these self-confessed lovers of equine beatitude, picturesque speed
and the pari-mutuals as they flock into the heart of the Bluegrass
country next weekend to witness the 65th running of the Kentucky
Derby May 6.
But as interesting as the actual running of the race are the betting and
the reactions after the race is done. Without entering too deeply into
economic determinism it may be dogmatically stated that the mode of pro-
duction in the material life determines the spiritual processes of life after the
Derby.
As a case in point, we may refer immediately to last year's affair. We
had heard that an old racing adage held that breeding always tells. We were
young, impressive and impulsive. The tenets of the racing fathers were as
decisions of the Supreme Court to us. So we climbed the horses' family
trees, saw who was "out" of whom, took blood tests and finally plunked a
couple of bucks on the back of Fighting Fox, a full Brother of Gallant
Fox and Omaha, a pair of Derby winners.
But unbeknown to us, the Fox's spine was in a rather unsettled
condition and the added weight of our two dollars must have broken his
back. Yes, sir, breeding always tells. In fact, the only way they could
tell that Fighting Fox was still alive after the race was that he was
still breeding.
Now this Saturday, Johnstown faces the barrier with the same doubtful
recommendations. He is one of the fraters from the Belair Stud and like
his older black sheep brother whose racing blood turned to sugar diabet
at the 5/8 mark last year, Johnstown is a sprinter. But he showed symptoms
of staying power last Tuesday at Jamaica when he set a new track record
and was off the American record only two-fifths of a second for the mile
and 70 yards in 1:40.8, and when, like Fighting Fox, he won the Wood
Memorial yesterday.
Of course, other people have different systems for betting. Some
stay up nights before the race gazing at the stars. Or if clouds shut off
the message from the gods, they go home and dream. Fitting some-
where into one of these categories are the "hunch" player or, as they
are more often called, the "what a fool I am" type.
Now, in this particular Derby, people belonging to this nomenclature
might play Technician. The Wolff colt is well rated, will probably be 8-5
at post time and is a terrific stretch runner. But the hunch players entirely
disregard his paper potentialities and simply because they are technicians
of sorts themselves or are technocrats or are electricians which rhymes
with Technician, they will plunge on this nag.
Another of the favored horses is Win. Ziegler's El Chico who ran sixth
in the Wood after being bumped at the start. Obviously named after one
of the Marx brothers (the story goes that Ziegler, talking to the Marx boy
when news of the colt's birth came, expostulated "what the 'el Chico") this
winter book favorite will have the support of all leftists and may yet have
the last horse laugh. A tremendous sprinter, he won all of his seven starts
last year and was the leading money winner among two-year olds with
$84,100. If El Chico finds the stamina to go with his early speed, he'll make
the books turn over a new leaf.
Outside of Chaliedon and Volitant, two strong finishers, and maybe
Yale o'Nine, the rest are a bunch of hay-eaters. That means that their
blood line isn't so strong. That in turn means that they'll romp home in
front of the heritage horses.
-M. F.

Long Sciuinage
Features Opening
Stadium Practice
Coach Fritz Crisler took his football
hopefuls out to the Stadium yester-
day for the first time this year, and
before Headmaster Fritz finished
with them, they had put in two solid
hours of intensive scrimmage in al-
most mid-summer weather.
The squad of approximately 45 men
was divided tip into two teams and
a practice game was held. Both teams
were evenly matched throughout the1
game, although numerous substitu-i
tions were sent in by Coach Crisler
in'order to give every man an oppor-
tunity to play.
The tremendous offensive power of
both teams overshadowed their de-
fense and enabled them to score al-
most at will. However, considering
that September is still a long time j
off, the team shows great potentiali-
ties. Bob Westfall, former Ann Arbor
High School star, showed aggressive-
ness and ability as he drove through
the line several times for lengthy
gains.
Pittdu Is Pushed
To New Mark.
By Wolverines
Record In One-Mile Relay
Falls At Penn; Watson
Fails In Title Defense

l; Golfers
Limksmen WinBs
Bo
Sixth Straight SSt
Match,91/-8%1/2
Emiery's Plat On aIst 1 ole
Decides (lose (Aontes4;i
Palmer Has Low Card
(Continued from Page 1)
the par 36 that Lynn Riess shot on
the final nine. Riess lost one point
on the first nine, but came back to
win the back nine as well as the 18th,
to give him a 2-1 win over Bob Mc-
Kenzie.
The morning best ball play saw the
teams each win three points and Pal-
mer capture medal honors for the
day with a'fine 73, one over par.
Palmer teamed up with Riess, and
despite his fine medal play, the team
dropped all three points to Marshall
and Hoffer.t Riess was off on the
round, and was able to give little
help to Palmer, while Marshall card-
ed a 75 and Hoffer tallied 77.
Jim Loar, the only senior on the
Wolverine team, played with Emery
in 'the doubles competition and each
of them carded 76 to garner three
points from David with 78 and Mc-
Kenzie who shot 80.
The win is the second conference
victory for the Wolverines this sea-
son. Tomorrow they meet Western
State Teachers college at the Univer-
sity course, the first match begin-
ning at 12:45 p.m.

Defeat

Purdue
AMEflI('AN EAG HE U0RES
Boston 3, Philadelphia 2.
Washington 3. N.Y. 1.
Cleveland 7, Detroit 1.
Chicago 9, St. Louis 8.

ATIONAL llAGUiJE S~Uti S
ton 8, N.Y. 1.
cinnati 5, Pitts. 3.
Louis 2, Chicago 0.
ooklyn 5, Philadelphia 0.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....r~ ~ r r ' r r r ' - y r w v - r ' ' - # V V' V . . . . .. . .

12:30

- - 7:30

will be resumed Sunday, April 30
417 East Huron St. Phonc 7781

i7
.6r;

RE S T R NG
Your Tennis Ra cket
Armour Victor -
Juncman' - Johnson Strings

I

A Different Story

G eo. J. Moe

(Continued from Page 1)
good. N.Y.U. was third and Princeton1
fourth.1
In the four mile, won by North
Texas State and the Rideouts, Michi-
gan. was right up with Manhattanj
and the Texans through the first
lap, and even when Wayne Rideout
opened up a 30-yard lead on the1
second lap, still was close behind7
Manhattan.
Manhattan moved up on the third
lap and in the final leg, as Blaine
Rideout finished 120-yards ahead of
Manhattan's Andy Neidnig, Ralph1
Schwarzkopf, Wolverine anchor man,
fell back 100-yards behind the Jasper1
anchor man to give the Michigan team
third place.1
Schwarzkopf tried the ironman1
stunt by running in the two-mile lesst
than an hour after the four-mile.
This time he was assigned to the
third leg and when he passed over
the baton to anchor man Jester it1
was still a three-team scrap withI
Michigan, Indiana, and N.Y.U. fight-
ing it out. On the last lap, however,
Curtis Giddings of N.Y.U. let go a
well-timed kick down the home
stretch that lifted him out a yard in
front of Indiana's Mel Trutt, with
Jester several yards further back in1
third.1
Michigan won its heat in the half-
mile championship but the time of
1:28.7 was a second too slow to quali-
fy it for the final,
Bill Watson, the Michigan captain
who yesterday won the shot put and
finished second in the discus throw,;
was forced to relinquish his broad
jump title to Anson Perina of Prince-
ton. Perina leaped 24 ft. 9/4 in. to
top Watson's 24 ft. 2 in.
Dick Bennett and Don Canham,,
Michigan entrants in the javelin
throwv¢ and high jump respectively,
failed to place.
Warneke Allows One Hit1
CHICAGO, April 29.-(,P)-Lanky
Lon Warneke, St. Louis Cardinals' I
ace pitcher, missed out on no-hit
baseball fame today by one scratch
single as he whitewashed the Chicago
Cubs, 2 to 0, in a masterful exhibi-
tion. Stanley Hack, Cub third base-
man, got the only hit as the Arkan-
sas hurler shut out the Cubs for the
second time this season. It was the
Chicago team's third straight loss.

Michigan 9 AB
Pink; cf ..............5
Sofiak, ss ............3
Peckinpaugh, 3b .....4
Gedeon, lb ..........3
Trosko, If ...........3
Steppon, rf .........4
Lisagor, 2b ..........4
Beebe, c .............4
Sm ick, p .............4

R,
1
2
0
1
0
2
z
1

II
1
1
1
1
0
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2

O
2
1
0
14
0
2
2
6
0

A
0
1
4
0
0
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0
5

SPORT SHOPS
University

711 North

902 South State

11 -_. _._

A

...34 9 9 27 12

Totals.......

Notre Dame l AB
Nardone, cf ..........4
Roy Pinelli, rf:.......2
Sullivan, 3b .........:4
Ray Pinelli, ss .........,2
Doyle, lb ... ........4
Oberbrunner, if ......4
Crane, 2b ...........3
Verhoestra, c..... ..3
Mandjiak, p.........2
Behe, rf ..............0
*W agner .. . ..........1
**Farrell............1

RIHOA

Atiuou0eiu411lg
the
ESQU IRE,

.0
0
0
0
0
0
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0

0
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10
0
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0
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a'

BARBER

S

DOMENIC DASCOLA
7 Years at
The Michigan Union
Michigan Men . . .

Totals ... .

...30 1 2 24 111

Owned and Operated by
A Michigan Grad.
Pep-Up with a selective treat-

II

*-batted for Crane in 9th.
**-batted for Verhoestra in 9th.
Notre Dame ......000 000 010 1 2 6
Michigan........100 001 16x 9 9 3
Errors: Michigan: Peckinpaugh,
Lisagor, Smick; Notre Dame: Sulli-
van 4, Crane, Oberbrunner. Two base
hit: Beebe. Three base hit: Smick.
Sacrifice: Ray Pinelli. Double Plays:
Peckinpaugh to Lisagor to Gedeon,
Sullivan (unassisted). Left on bases:
Notre Dame 6, Michigan 4. Bases on
balls: Off Smick 3, -off Mandjiak 3.
Struck out: By Smick 6, by Mandjiak
6. Wild pitches: Mandjiak (2). Hit
by pitcher: By Smick (Behe). Um-
pires: Vick and Linsay.

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