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April 23, 1939 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
ned Career As Newsboy But Graduated To Gran

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- Began Studies In College
Made Debut At Monte Carlo,

his operatic
Carlo Opera
France, and

debut with the Monte
and successes in Italy,
Germany followed in

Elizabeth Wysor Hailed As Star
Among Younger Concert Artists,

\7/-

I Metropolitan, Unit
1932 After Singing
h Mary Garden
course of a brilliant singing
Richard Bonelli, the man
e story reads like aHoratio
vel, has earned a popularity
ntitles him to the title ofi
e of baritones."
>nelli, who made his debut
Metropolitan Opera in 1932,'
'nt, the father in "La Trav-
pplements his operatic and
ppearances with radio broad-
ring the past season he co
enviable record. He was the
ropolitan Opera singer to be
for the Ford "Universal
Hour," in a series that ran
er and in addition he made
pearances as soloist on the
nday Evening Hour.
ne, of all American baritones,
ed to sing at the Inaugural
given in Washington last

year in honor of President Roosevelt.
This season, the New York Phil-
harmonic has engaged him to play
the important role of Amfortas in
a concert -version of Parsifal. Toscan-
ini selected him for this part when
it was presented four years ago.
Bonelli worked his way through
high school, doing all sorts of odd
jobs after hours. Newsboy, farmer's
helper in harvest time, bank mes-
senger, bookkeeper, gardener in a
cemetery, auto mechanic's helper, and
zinc miner-these were buG a few of
the jobs which kept the prospective!
opera star busy during his school
years.
It was while he was attending Syra-
cuse University on a scholarship, that
the Dean heard the young man sing.
Musical talent ran in Bonelli's fam-,
ily and the Dean, deeply impressed
with his ability convinced him to
start out on the venturesome but
glamorous path which is the life of
an opera star.
After studying for a tifie, a friend

rapid order. ,
The name Bonelli was evolved from
the Yankee, Bunn, during his stay
in Italy, where it is quite common;
for the opera manager to demand a
name of Italian fabrication.
While singing with Mary Gardon
in Paris he was engaged by the Chi-
cago Opera Company, returning to
America in 1925, he remained with
that group until he joined the Metro-
politan in 1932.
Bonelli is not new to Ann Arbor
music lovers; he appeared in last
year's May Festival. Heis also in-
dispensable to the famous festivals
at Worcester and Evanston.
"A great singer, a fine actor, a
great personality,"' Archie 'Bell of the
Cleveland News sums up the factors
of Bonelli's success. Critics stand
together in their praise of the star.
He combines a manly personality,\ a
superb voice, and a polished artistry.

Elizabeth Wysor, young contralto,
showed her love of study at a very
early age.
When four years old she visited by
chance a physics class at the college
where her father was teaching. Upon
returning home, her mother asked
her what the instructor had taught
her. The astonishing answer was: "I
learned about pripciple and result."
Since then Miss Wysor has been
spending her life studying in more
ways than one-"principle and re-
sult."
She has always loved sports and
the out-of-doors. Her ability in draw-
ing and writing was apparent long
before her musical gift. She startled
her family by writing a complete
novel at the age of twelve. The teach-
er of the Ifigh School Glee Club en-
couraged her to study music when she

realized the possibilities in the qual-
ity of her voice.
After carefully debating the mat-
ter, she chose between art and music,
and from the first set her heart on
the operatic stage. She enriched her
love and knowledge of classical music
and was intensely interested in dra-
matic Wagnerian roles. Her train-
ing in Munich and with Mme Matz-
enauer gave her fine musicianship
and developed her voice into the clear,
rich tones wnich it has now.
Miss Wysor, though possessing a

TIIES' APPLAUDS CORDON
The New York Times, on the oc-
casion of Norman Cordon's debut
said of him: -Cordon displayed poise
and assurance in the delivery of his
music. His voice proved one of con-
siderableivolume andcommendable
quality ,and was intelligently em-
ployed."
voice of phenomenal size, is slight
of build, about average in height,
has blonde hair and large green-grey
eyes. Her expression, though gener-
ally serious, does not conceal her
sense of humor and vital personality.
She is fond of unusual and fine books
and likes to spend her spare time
delving into history, philosophy and
the biographies of outstanding people.

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4

offered himthe money t9 go to France
and study. He accepted, and after
Paris, events moved swiftly. He made

,, ,
_

RUDOLPH

I

borges Enesco

Star of Stage
Star of Radio
Star of Screen

SERKIN

/

I I , ",*

Coming for the

clirst

Qcime

"He is a poet who unfolds the living beauty
of the music he plays."-Minneapolis Journal,
November 29, 1937.
Rudolph Serkin first appeared in this country
five years ago and since then has been enjoy-
ing immediate and widespread acclaim wherev-
er he has appeared. We are proud to have such
a distinguished piano virtuoso on our program.
He will appear as a soloist on Thursday eve-
ning, May 11.

TO THE MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT

1

"She radiates youth, grace. anid freshness. A miezzo of

On
Saturday AfterIoon Illy I 3tiP , 2:
*e (give you the Al -tN E (XJ P tOGK AM

greal warm/h, richni ess and pludrily."

-BAL TIMORE SUN.

_I

Violin Soloist and Guest onductor
of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

GLADYS SWARTHOUT

MAY FESTIVAL

THE MAY FESTIVAL

a'"

I

w I I Iemu

The 1939

(

o

The University of
to be held May 10-13.

Michigan Sehool of Music presents the foity-sixth annual May Festival,
For almost five decades the May Festivals have presented the out-

standing Music Personalities, and this year have again attained the same high standards.

ORGANIZATIONS
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Eugene Ormandy
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Directed by Earl V. Moore.
THE YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
Juva Higbee, Conductor.

SOLOISTS
HELEN JEPSON .. Soprano
GLADYS SWARTHOUT ........Soprano
SELMA .AMANSKY . .. <., . e....., Soprano
MARIAN ANDERSON a, ,.Contralto
ELIZABETH WYSOR ,. ... .... .Contralto
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI........:..Tenor
JAN PEERCE .....,. ....,...Tenor
GIUSEPPE CAVADORE . ....,. .,. Tenor
RICHARD BONELLI .......... ..Baritone
NORMAN CORDON' ..... ...... .aBaritone
EZIO PINZA .,..,,.,.., .,,.,.,....Bass
GEORGES ENESCO .... , .. .,. .Violinist
RUDOLF SERKIN...............Pianist

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CHORAL WORKS

Verdi

Otello.a.

Alto Rhapsody'
Choral Symphony
Psalmus Hungaricus

Brahms

McDonald
Kodaly

PRICES:
SEASON TICKETS: (Six Con- MAY FESTIVAL COUPONS INDIVIOUAL CONCERT
certs) Now on sate at the Main from Season Choral Union Tick. TICKETS now on sale "over the
Office of the School of Music, ets entitles original holders to counter" for $1.00, $1.50, $2.00,
on Maynard Street. Prices are price reductions to $3.00, $4.00, and $2.50.

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