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April 23, 1939 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 1939

Steppon s

Homer Gives

Smick Allows
Buckeyes Only
Seven Safeties
Danny Also Fans Seven
In Close Hurling Duel
With Jirmy Sexton
(Continued from Page 1)
the first time in the second inning.
After Smick was hit by a pitched
ball to open the inning, Pete Lisagor
sacrificed him to second, and Leo
Beebe's single put Dan on third. Then
came Steppon's turn and walloping
Willie got hold of the first pitch and
lined a double to left scoring Smick
to make the count 2-1.
Great Future Predicted
Only 19 years old,-a great future is
predicted for Steppon by Coach Ray
Fisher, but at present the young
Detroiter presents a peculiar dilem-
ma. Bill's natural position 'is sec-
ond base but that sector is well tak-
en care of at present by the veteran
Pete Lisaggre who.has been one of
the Wolverines' leading hitters all
spring. In the outfield Bill is defi-
nitely not as good defensively as any
of the regulars, Pink, Trosko, or
Smick. But the fact remains that
Steppon is a hitter and his big bat
may be too valuable to keep out of
the line-up.
Michigan's first run which came in
the opening inning was somewhat in
the nature of a gift from Ohio. Pink
opened with a clean single to left and
took second when outfielder Frank
Smith bobbled the . ball. After Mike
Sofiak walked, Peckinpaugh was out
on a weak grounder to the infield but*
shortstop Ralph Waldo's throw home
was wild and Charley scored stand-
ing up.
Buckeyes Rally
Three successive singles by Tony
Jesko, Bill Laybourne, and Smith
gave the Buckeyes their first tally in
the first and they come back to tie
the score in the third on hits by Gene
Meyers, Laybourne and Smith. After
this Smick was almost, invincible, a
line single by Smith in the sixth on
which Trosko's attempt for a shoe-
string catch was almost successful
being Ohio's only other safe blow.
Michigan's next game is scheduled
for Tuesday, the Wolverines meet-
ing Hillsdale College at Hillsdale with
Russ Dobson, junior right-hander
scheduled to do the pitching.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Announcement is made that the
I-M building is not open on Sun-
day's, but is open throughout the
week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. from
Monday to Saturday. On Satur-
day the hours are from 8 am. to
6 p.m.

Gets First Big Ten Win

PRESS PASSES

Philippines And Lacrosse
UTSIDE of his beer, his pipe, and a ribald joke, nothing satisfies a col-
umnist more than a pair of interesting contributions. He can forget
cliches for a day, attack his social functions with renewed vim, and bid the

Danny Smick, Michigan nine
letter man, pitched the varsity to
their first Big Ten victory of the
season today, allowing Ohio States'
Buckeyes only seven hits and two
runs in the full nine innings.

BOX SCoE

MichiganA
Pink, cf3 ...........
Sofiak, 3b. ........
Peckinpaugh, ss ....
Gedeon,. lb .......
Trosko, If ........
Smick, p ..........
Lisagor, 2b .........
Beebe, c ..........
Steppon, rf ......:...

AB
4
3
4
4
5
3
3
3
3

R
2
0
0
0
0'
1
0
0
1

H
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
1
2

Q
0
2
2
9
4
1
2
7
0'

A
0
4
2
0
0
0

The first epistle is penned by freshman Art Hill. His father. Norman
Hill, '11, served as aide to Attorney General Frank Murphy from 1933-37 in
the Philippines, and Hill junior has four years of island memoirs to recount.
Dear Bud-
Everyone knows that baseball is played in every nook and corner of
the United States; most fans know that it is also the national game of
Japan; but few realize that there is another little corner of the earth where
baseball has gained a permanent place in the hearts of the natives. I refer
to the Philippine Islands, where the American national game has been
played the year 'round almost since the turn of the century.
I was fortunate enough to spend a few years in "The Pearl of the
Orient," as Manila is known to the natives and the Chamber of Com-
merce, and had an opportunity to observe the baseball situation rather
closely. It is an interesting one, too, many of its angles being totally
foreign to baseball as we know it in the States.
In the first 'lace, baseball is strictly "amateur," there are no profes-
sional players, at least not officially. What's more there are no nasty rumors
of subsidization; everybody knows of its existence and nobody cares. A
classic example is the case of "Molly" Bland. Molly first came to the
Philippines with the Royal Giants, a Negro semi-pro outfit from Philadel-
phia which was making a tour of the Orient. The boys played out their
string and got ready to leave, but when their ship pulled out, the big
hurler wasn't aboard. He had decided he liked the place and'was going to
stay. It happened that the University of the Philippines' team was badly
in need of a little pitching talent at the time so they calmly proceeded to
present Molly with a professorship and he has been pitching for them for
the past six years.
Another grizzled veteran of the Philipoine diamond wars is "Doc"
Santos. The Doc is a short, squat gent of some 47 summers, built some-
what along the lines of the little round man, Jimmy Dykes. He is grow-
ing bald and his legs are beginning to give out, but he can still catch so,
like Ol' Man River, he just keens rollin' along. He was behind the bat for
Santo Tomas University long before Gabby Hartnett came up with the Cubs.
Leading slugger of the Manila Bay League is a well-built boay,
Pedro Santa Rosa of the Calainba Sugair Estate squad, the New York
Yankees of the Orient. He reminds one of Jimmy Foxx, although, of
course, he is slightly darker than Double-X.
The majority of the games played in Manila take place in the Rizal
Stadium, a beautiful park which would compare favorably with any minor
league plant in' this country. ,Whenever a ball is hit out of the park here, the
name of the batter accomplishing the feat is posted on the vall: At present,
there are but five names adorning the right field fence and none in left:
The names are those of Charley Gehringer, Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, and
Earl Averill (twice). The Big Leaguers hit the five in three exhibition
games played there during the winter of 1934.
Thanks for the hall, Bud.

Totals .........32 4 7 27 9

Ohio State

Hensel, 3b
Meyers, 2b
Jasko, rf
Laybourne,
Smith, if ..
Washburn,
Wulfhorst,
Waldo, ss
Sexton, p
Dornbrook,
Morgan x
Lynch, xx

ib,. . .. .
cf .......
p ........

AB
.4
.3
4
3
.4
.3
.4
.4
3
.0
. 1

R
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-

H
0
1
1
2
3
0.
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
1
1
10
4
2
6
1
1
0
0
0

A
1
0.
0
1
0
1
0
3
4
2
0
0
12

I'

Totals ..........34 2 7 27

Michigan.........110 000
Ohio State .......101 000
x-Batted for Waldo in 9th.

200.-4
400-2

xx-Batted for Dornbrook
Errors: Smith, Waldo 3,
Wulfhorst, Lisagor.
Two-base hits: Steppon.
Home runs: Steppon.
Double plays: Sofiak to
paugh to Gedeon.

in 9th.
Trosko,

Peckin-I

Stolen bases: Ieckinpaugh, Beebe.
Hits off: Sexton 7 in 8 innings. Off
Dornbrook, 0 in 1 inning.
Hit by pitcher-by Sexton (Smick).
Struck out by Sexton 4, Smick 7,
Dornbrook 1.

LET...
RAMSA-KERN, Printers
help you build up your business.Q
National Bank Building Phone 7900
1'- '1=o=><=><=><:;o=> m <=><=o==o=>O

THE NEXT letter comes from two students who spotted an item on the
women's page last week on lacrosse.
To the Ed.
We saw a notice for a meeting of the girls' lacrosse clubin' The Daily
of April 18, and we write this letter in hopes that something nay, e done
towards starting a men's team at the University.
We are sure that there is material at the University for the nucleus
of a fair squad, for last year we had a list of about 20 boys who had
played in high school and would be willing to lay here. Interest would
be sure to spread once the game was started; and laci of experience
should be no drawback to anyone who wants to learn to play.
The game would cost the University very little to start with, and in a
few years might be able to more than support itself. A coach would be
needed only to give some organization and he need not have excperience at
the game at all.
Lacrosse would supply the best possible spring training for members
of the football squad, for it embodies both speed and bodily contact. The
squads at both Annapolis and West Point are well suiplied by football
players. This fact need not discourage a small or light man, for it is
one game that can be played equally well' by all sizes.
We would appreciate very much the cooperation of the board of ath-
letics and the student body to help us put a team in inter-collegiate com-
petition by the spring of 1940.

I-

A

l3endct ata .f4~inq -M -

&

Ill

HANDBAGS
Soft Spring colors
bags - just the
wardrobe.

4

in striking cloth and leather
colors to match your Spring

COLORED BAGS . . . $2.25 were $2.95
Cif h , _ 1.49 wr-rt- 1 .

11

IA -& -- - '- III III

III

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