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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 31, 1939 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Palestine Work
Prizes Opened
To Applicants
Avukah Awards Provide
Year's Labor And Study
On Holy Land Projects
April 30 Is Deadine
The Palestine Work-Fellowships
for 1939-40, inaugurated by Avukah,'
American Student Zionist Federation,
for the establishment of direct con-
tacts between American students and
the collectives of Palestine, and for
the training of a new leadership for
the Youth Zionist Movement in
America, are now open for applica-
tions.
The award provides for a year's
stay in Palestine. The winner par-
icipates fully in the life of the agri-
cultural collective, and is afforded
special facilities for the studies of
the problems of Palestine. Provision
mnay also be made for a short period
of residence at the Hebrew Univer-
sity.
Each fellowship carries with it the
payment of all expenses for travel to
and from Palestine and for the year's'
stay. Application for the work-fel-
lowships is open to students in col-
leges in the United States and Cana-
da. Two or more men and women
will be selected by the Committee on
Awards and on the basis of written

Main Library Arranges Colored
Displays Of International Birds
In keeping with the theme of shown in the case because of the
spring, Ella M. Hymans, curator of large size of the drawings.
rare books, has arranged an exhibit "Birds of the United States" by
of bird books on display in the cor- Alexander Wilson is the pioneer of
ridor of the Main Library which in- Audabon's work. Wilson, born ir
clude vividly colored plates of birds Scotland, came -to America in 179-1
from South Amer;ca, Great Britain, where he acquired his knowledge of
France, .India, Canada, Ethiopia, birds from William Bartram, a natu-
Southern Rhodesia and the United ralist. In order to make a collection
States. of American birds, Wilson set out on
Some of the volumes on display a pedestrian tour through westerr
form part of Bradshawe H. Swayles New York, which was then a wilder-
Memorial Library. Mr. Swayles, '96L, ness. He drew the pictures of birds
was an ornithologist at the United from original specimens.
States National Museum and honor- The first scientific drawing and de-
ary curator of birds in the University scription of the red-headed wood-
Museum of Zoology. After his death pecker is found in "The Natural His-
in 1928, Mrs. Swayles, presented his tory of North Carolina, Florida and
entire collection of bird books to the the Bahama Islands" by Mark Cates-
University forming the nucleus of by, with illustrations of American
the Museum Ornithological Library. birds.
One of the earliest and most valu- Included in the case of books writ-
able of the Library's possessions is the ten from zoological voyages are: "The
complete set of original plates of the Zoology of the Voyage of the Beagle,"
"Birds of America" by John J. Auda- 1832-36, edited and superintended by
bon, which was purchased in 1839 for Charles Darwin, "The Zoology of
$1,000. A set, issued in 87 parts, con- Captain Beechey's Voyage," 1839 and
sists of 435 drawings, engraved and "The National Antarctic Expedition,"
colored from the artist's drawings 1901-04.
which represented the birds in na- Fifty-four current. ornithological
tural size. Audabon's stupendous periodicals are available in the bird
project was 12 years in the making. division of the University Museum's
Of the 165 sets issued, 90 are now in Libraries. Much important infor-
existence. Only one plate which has mation about birds may be found
been trimmed and framed can be there, Miss Hymans said.
Ti

IL

Hitler's 'rang Nach Osten' ProceedsWith Danzig Next

Broadway Star Again

Fate of Memel, a small Baltic sea patch of once-German territory put under~Lithuanian mandate by Ver-
sailles treaty, was decided last week by Adolf Hitler. Nazification of Memel was evidenced by this and similar
banners, which reads: "Right must be right even when Germans are concerned." Memel's fall made world
wonder how lasting is - (below)

Her first hit on Broadway in years
gives Tallulah Bankhead the role of
greedy, cruel Regina in "The Little
Foxes," a tale of Southern money-
grabbers.
Host To British Officers

quisite for the fellowship is
Luaintance. with conversa-
brew as this is the language
ectives. Any applicant who
knowledge should get in
h the Committee on Awards
Further 'information and
n blanks may be received
Committee on Awards, Avu-
Fifth Ave., New York City.
ins must be returned by
The winners will be an-
arly in May and will leave
Ine at the end of the sum-

Another Ships
OXFI

mont of those Popular
ORDS
ss~a _

Spanish Group
To Give Play
August Night's Dream'
Had One Year's Run
La Sociedad Hispanica will present
"Sueno de una Noche en Agosto"
("An August Night's Dream"), a
Spanish play in three acts, by Mar-
tinez Sierra, Tuesday, April 4, in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The play has serious thought be-
hind it, but is worked out in a sur-
prisingly light comedy, not without
even a touch of slapstick. The plot
is ultra-modern, the dialogue being
apropos even to 1939.
"An August Night's Dream" had a
year's run on Broadway in 1921. It is
one of the most popular plays of its
noted Spanish author, who is per-
haps best known to the American
public for his "Cancion, de Cuna,
("Cradle Song").
Both leads in the play have been
changed since production first start-
ed more than a- month ago. ,The
leading roles are now being, played by
Margaret Bryant, '39, and Alfred
Hower, '39. Dr. Charles N. Stau-
bach, assisted by J. Chalmers Her-
man, both of the Spanish depart-
ment, is in charge of the direction
of the play. Ermelindo A. Mercado,
also of the Spanish department, is in
charge of staging and production.
Action Drive 'Begun
By Phi Beta Kappa
"To The Defense! ", a presentation
in words, photographs and charts of
the "present need for vigorous ac-
tion to preserve America's intellec-
tual liberty," was issued this week by
the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kap-
pa to 15,000 members and interested
persons in the New York area.
Additional copies will later be sent'
to various parts of the country in a
widespread program to dramatize the
aims and ideals of the national hon-
or society, and its importance in
naintaining a high level of scholar-
ship.
Alumnus Composes
New Michigan Song
A new field song, "Hail Michigan,"
written by Claudius G. Pendill, '13,
ind dedicated to the Michigan Band,
s now being "polished" by the au-
hor and Prof. William D. Revelli,
lirector of the band, in preparation
for a possible "premiere" on the foot-
>all field next fall, it was revealed
'ecently in a letter from Pendill to
he Alumni Association here.
The song was first sng nublicpi a+

1 ':'

A LL T HES E
WAYSIa:d
BROWN and WHITEI BLACK and
WHITE BLUE and WHITE! "Tug" or
regulation toesl CREPE, SUEDED $ .95.
RUBBER or LEATHER SOLESI Come
here for your "saddlesd"
....

General Mauri;. Gustave Ca-me-
lin (;bove), chi of the French
general staff, was host t9 a dele-
gation of high British army officers
during a visit to France's famous
Maginot Line of defenses bordering
Germany.
(,ets Panama Post

The freedom of 'Free City' Danzig, which was created by Versailles treaty to give Poland a seaport on the
Baltic, gives concern to statesmen watching Hitler's empire-making sweep eastward. Here is a view of Dan-
zig harbor. With a dominantly German population, Da nzig could breed trouble. To its east is Fast Prussia; to
its west is the Polish Corridor.

Pants Are Too Small; Fined $200

No Divorce For Joan

J.aiecud &cudV

Panama post is slated for William
Dawson, 53, the Minister to Uru-
'guay named by F.D.R. as Ambassa-
dor to Panama. With this appoint-
ment, 'Panama's diplomatic repre-
sentation is raised to ambassador-
ial status.

r >:
"I

Stag erior Judge Benjamin Schein-
man (above), of Los Angeles, re-
fused to grant a "remote control"
divorce to Joan Crawford, who was
in New York, saying "it is against
the policy of this court to consider
a divorce action unless the plaintiff
is present."

Sheridan Sets Style

Whether you prefer a coat
of casual smartness or one
whose fitted lines are the
very essence of Spring Ele-
gance . . . you're sure to
find exactly the right model
in this exciting collection of
new styles. Here are proud
examples of many famous
(couturieres' genius in re-
gard to line and fit .

Because he said he was given size 36 pants wheli he asked for size 42,
Nick Theophanis went to court in Chicago wearing a blanket and bed-
room slippers to protest against local relief administrators. Judge Thom-
as Green found out that he was an alien and fined him $200 for dis-
orderly conduct.
Franco's Victorious Troops Enter Madrid

as low as

- 16.95,\ '

-~ -- .I.~-. ~

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