100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 30, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, M

THxIHGNDIL HRDY

Guggenheim
Award Is Won
By Fredenthal
Detroit Artists' Paintings
On Exhibition Here;,
To Be Criticized Sunday
For the second time in two years,
David Fredenthal, whose works are
now on exhibition in Alumni Mem-
orial Hall, has been named winner
of the John Simon Guggenheim
Memorial Fellowship, it was an-
nounced last Sunday. The fund will
permit him to spend a year of re-
search and study in his favorite field,
experimentation in tempera and oil
murals.
The 25-year-old Detroit artist has
had to undergo all the traditional
struggles of an artist. He studied
art at Southeastern and Cass Tech-
nical High School. When his parents
urged him to abandon art in favor
of a steady job, he left home and
found work in a print shop at $4 a
week. While he was still a student
he was awarded a scholarship at the
Cranbrook Academy of Art.
His work in Detroit factories,
abroad lake steamers and in CCC
camps provided him with many of
the subjects for his paintings. Four
years ago a $500 fellowship in the
Museum of Modern Arts enabled him
to study in France and Italy.
Although eight years ago an exhi-
bition of his work was refused him
by New York art patrons who feared
premature success might hamper la-
ter accomplishments, critics through-
out the country have since hailed his
work'as that of a genius. Among his
better known works are the murals
in the Detroit Naval Armory and a
mural which he recently completed
for the New York World's Fair.
Prof. Jean Paul Slusser, of the Col-t
lege of Architecture, will discuss
Fredenthal's work in a gallery talk at{
2:30 p.m. Sunday in Alumni Mem-
orial Hall. The talk will be open to
the public.t

sTUDENT SENATE CANDIDATES
BUCK, Charles...................................... Socialist
GOODMAN, Abraham James ............ Independent Liberal
FRANKEL, James ...... . ........... . ...........Human Rightisv
ULMER, Robert..............................Human Rightist
MUEHL, E. William .... . ......................... Neutrality Prog
HUSTON, John A. ................................ Neutrality Prog
SAHLIN, Clarence...............................Conservative
HAHN, Maurice................... .......................
ROBERTSON, Paul C .............................Independent
ROSENFELD, Norman.................................Liberal
SOJKA, Casmir......
KAPHAN, Norma ......... . ....... ..........University Coalition
KELSEY, Harry M......................... University Coalition
RHEA, Ellen F. . .............................. University Coalition
K EH OE, Jam es W . ........ .....................................
PETERS, Arthur.Young Communist League
HOURIGAN, Francis .................... Independent Progressive
BEASLEY, William R . ....................... Liberal Conservative

DOBER, Bud ............................ American Student
JOHNSON, Frank ........................ American Student
OSTERWEIL, Harold .................... American Student
ZUBON, Jack ............................ American Student
CUMMINS, Mary ........................ American Student
LICHTENSTEIN, Morris .................. American Student
REICHARD, Hugo ........................ American Student
GIES, Joseph ............................ American Student

Union
Union
Union
Union
Union
Union
Union
Union

Three Alumni
Are Honored
Aeronautical Designer And
Budget Director Selected
Choices of the "Michigan Alumnus"
this week for "Who's Who in the
Alumni University" are Harold D.
Smith, '25, Robert J. Woods,' '28E,
and Oreon E. Scott, '94L.
Smith, newly appointed director of
the United States Bureau of the
Budget, is a Republican, and in spite
of his youth, has had many years
experience in public service. He was
director of the budget in Michigan
before accepting his new post.
Woods has given the United States
the most striking developm'ent in
fighting planes, the "Airacuda," ac-
cording to Maj.-Gen. H. H. Arnold in
a recent statement. After much pain-
staking work, Woods, now chief en-
gineer of the Bell Aircraft Companyl
of Buffalo, perfected a durable,{
speedy, twin-engined monoplane, nowI
called "tiger of the sky."
Scott has been elected president for
the tenth consecutive year of the
Board of Church Extension of the
Disciples of Christ. He is a past presi-
dent of the University' of Michigan
Club of St. Louis. While on campus
he published the first Student Direc-
tory, probably the first undergraduate
directory of any university.
Thomas Lyles To Present
Organ Recital Tomorrow
Thomas Minter Lyles, of Spartan-
burg,'S.C., will' present an organ re-
cital at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium. Lyles, a pupil of' Prof.
Palmer Christian, is presenting the
recital in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for a Master of Music
degree.
Lyles' program wi 11include:
Eighteenth Psalm by Marcello; Jesu,
Joy of Man's Desiring, Adagio from
the Toccata and Fugue in C minor
and the Fantasia and Fugue in G
minor by Bach; Chorale in A minor
by Franck; Variations on an An-
cient Christmas Carol by Dethi r;p
Scherzo from the First Symphony by
Maquaire; Toccata (Tu es Petra' by
Mulet.

Young Communist
The Young Communist League
stands for the support and extension
of democracy for the broadcast sec-
tions of the people-students, work-
ers, intellectuals as well as all minor -
ity groups.
We believe that the problems which
face young people today-unprece-
dented unemployment, war, class and
racial oppression-will be complete-
ly solved only after a full program
of democracy for the broadest sec-
cepted by the peoples of the world.
We know that our full program can
be advanced, not by "radical" phrase-I
mongering, but only by protecting andI
extending democracy.
For this reason we favor the main-
tenance and extension of New Deal
measures providing security against
the threat of reaction and fascist ag-
gression. We support the cooperative'
movement for obtaining better stu-
dent living conditions and lower cost
housing, books, and eating facili-
ties. We support the American Stu-
dent Union, the Student Senate, and
other broad, democratic organizations
serving the educational, economic,
and social needs of students.
Arthur Peters

develops, as is true of any representa-
tive body, but it should be controlledf
in order to prevent too-wide diver-I
gence of opinion .nd thus hinder ef-
fective action. Compromise should be
the norm.
Paul C. Robertson, '40 E
University Coalition j
We have watched the activities of
the Student Senate since its inaugura-
tion a year ago.
We believe that the discussion on
the Senate floor has indicated a
growing interest in University affairs
and less emphasis on national and
foreign affairs as the Senators have
become more experienced.
We see in this a healthy trend to-
ward the time when Senators will de-
vote the greater part of their efforts
to campus affairs and very little to
sending cablegrams to Hitler.
We will strive, if elected, to do all
we can to maintain this trend.
We favor a liberal stand on all Uni-
versity matters.
Norma Kaphan I
Harry M. Kelsey
Ellen Rhea

Candidates In The Student Senate
Elections Tomorrow Ghie Platforms

demnation of the efforts of such pres-
sure groups as the Young Communist
I League, the American Student Union,
and others to make the Daily repre-
sent a single viewpoint rath r than
the open-minded policy whic gives
voice to all, representĀ§ the entire uni-
versity and which is pursued at pres-
ent by the present managing editor.
William R Beasley
Clarence Sahlin
Neutrality Progressive
Resistance to any and all policies
which would serve to involve the
l United States in foreign war.
Opposition to authoritarian govern-
ment and privilege and their cam-
pus concomitants, undue restriction
of student activities and race preju-
dice.
John A. Huston
William Muehl
SHuman Rightist
Believing, as we do, that \the wel-
fare of the individual is the most im-
portant factor a society can. foster,
we shall, if elected, always align our-
selves on the side of personal liber-
ties and voice our protest whenever

SILLIN, Lee..................- - -- - - - .............................
SCHAF'RANN,. Jay ........................... ............. ...-'
REINHEIMER, Frederick S . ........................... Nationalist
DUBELL, Frank A . .............................................
LUCAS, Blaz A....................... ...........Conservative
DWYER, Raymond ............................ ...Conservative
SHAW, Elizabeth ............................ Progressive Coalition
KUHN, Robert J . ...... . .................... Progressive Coalition
NEVIN, Frances .............................. Progressive Coalition
HARRINGTON, G. Robert..................................
G RA DY , Jack ................................... ...............
Facilities For Recreation To Be
EnlargedIf Senate Bill Passes

r r]'-)nra.1 # t-Q&-ivarvo

Development of large-scale recrea-
tional facilities along the Huron and
Clinton river valleys surrounding the
Detroit area and embracing Wayne,
Washtenaw and three adjoining
counties will become a reality if Sen-

Hare System Of Proportional
Representation Is explained

P. R. Method With Single
Transferable Selection
To Be Used Tomorrow
An explanation of the Hare sys-]
tem of proportional representation
with the single transferable vote, to
be used in the Student Senate elec-
tions tomorrow as issued by Edward
Magdol, '39, director of elections, is
as follows:
1. All ballots will be thoroughly
mixed and then sorted in packages
according to the first choice ex-
pressed on each. The total numberl
of valid ballots shall be divided by
the figure 16 to give the quota neces-
sary for election. If any candidate
shall have received a number of first
choice votes equal to or exceeding the
quota, such candidates shall be de-
clared elected, and his surplus over
the quota, if any, shall be distributed
to the second choice candidates by
the use of the following formula:
Vote Transfer
Number transferred equals surplus
times candidate's second choice vote
divided by the total number of sec-
ond choices. Thus, if candidates
Jones receives 42 votes and the quota
is 25, he has a surplus of 17, which
would be distributed by the above
formula. If Smith had obtained 11
second choices among these 42 bal-
lots marked with Jones as the first
choice, Smith would receive' a num-
ber of transferred ballots as follows:
Seventeen (total surplus available
for distribution) times 11 (number of
second choices for Smith on Jones'
ballots) divided by 42 (total number
of Jones' ballots).
Lowest Counted Out
2. After the distribution of the sur-
plus votes of all candidates receiving
first choice votes equal to or ex-
ceeding the quota, provided there are
still vacancies to be filled, the can-
didate receiving the lowest number,
of first choice votes is declared de-
feated and his ballots are transferred
to the packages of the candidate who
is marked as second choice on the
ballot. This process of defeating un-
til the lowest candidate and trans-
ferring his votes is continued until
16 student senators have been electe k
with the quota or until there remain
only enough candidates to fill the re-
maining number of vacancies.
a. The ballots will be brought in
WPA Results Shown
By Museums Exhibit1
A new exhibit has been set up on
the fourth floor of the Museums
Building to serve as a barometer of
work being done throughout the State
on the museums project, which is be-
ing carried on with WPA funds.
This week the cases are filled with
wood-carvings, illustrating charact-
ers from Alice in Wonderland, Robin

the ballot box to Room 304 in the
Union. The responsibility for bring-
ing in the ballot box will rest with
the clerk who has charge of the poll-
ing place at the time voting ceases.
b. The ballots after being distribut-
ed into packages on the basis of the
first choice, shall be numbered to give
a check on the total number of bal-
lots credited to any one candidate. If
additional ballots are added to a can-
didate's package as the result of
transfers of elected candidate's sur-
pluses or of defeated candidate's
votes, these too, shall be numbered
consecutively.
c. In the distribution of elected
candidate's surpluses, the specific
ballots transferred after the number
to be transferred has been determined
in accordance with the above for-
mula, shall be those on the top of
the candidate's package, that is, the
highest numbered ones.
d. The count will be public and all
interested persons are invited to be
present.
e. Cases of dispute over the validity
of any ballot cast, or over the count-
ing system shall be decided by the
Directors of Elections.

ate Bill 115 passes the State Legisla-
ture.
The bill, which provides for county
cooperation in the construction of
parkways, parks and bathing beaches
throughout the "Detroit Metropoli-
tan District," was prepared by the
Huron-Clinton Parkway Committee,
which numbers among its members
Dean Samuel T. Dana of the school
of forestry, Prof. Edwin C. Goddard
of the law school, Prof. Henry E.
Riggs of the civil engineering depart-
ment and Prof. Harlow O. Whitte-
more of the department of land'scape
design.
Senate Bill 115 has already passed
the Senate unanimously and was
unanimously recommended for pas-
sage by the House Conservation
Committee. It is now under consider-
ation\by the House Metropolitan Com-
mittee.
The bill permits voters in the five
counties, which contain half the
state's population, to create an au-
thority in the regular November elec-
tion of 1940. This commission would
have four specific functions: educa-
tion, promotion, planning and ad-
ministration.
Rover Scout Head Speaks
today At Union Meeting
Lee D. Fuller of New York City, a
pioneer in the Rover scouting move-
ment in the United States, will speak
at 7:30 p.m. today at the Union at
the Rover Scout meeting.
Rover Crew No. 299 was formed in
1937 and was the first to be or-
ganized in Ann Arbor. The member-
ship of the crew is made up almost
entirely of University students who
have had some scouting.

'' ' " !r/"' ''""they are threatened or suppressed. In
Liberal Liberal conservatism is the term addition to this we feel that the Sen-
used to designate our candidacy be- ate can .serve a very worth-while
I believe in more student independ- cause we wish to be distinguished ;function in campus affairs and we
ence where campus affairs are con- from radicals masauerading under shall try to see that even more atten-
cerned and in racial and religious the guise of liberalism and from re- tion is devoted to local issues.
equality for all. actionaries who still consider 1922-29, James Frankel
Norman Rosenfeld the millenium. Robert Ulmer
As a platform liberal conservatism
Independent will seek American democracy. Recog- S 'ocit
nizing that communism is as much
There'exist four key bodies through a menace to democracy as fascism, I favor, short of complete economic
which the opinion of each group is we will try to combat these forces as and social change, that is, socialism:
voiced; the fraternities have their they appear on campus. 1. Opposition to all imperialist war.
Interfraternity Council, the sororities Locally, the immediate application 2. Spending for socially-useful pro-
have their Pan-Hellenic Association, of this platform will result in the jects rather than for super-arma-
the independent men have Congress, following: ments. 3. Complete racial equality. 4.
and the independent women have An investigation into all cases Abolition of militarism in education.
their Assembly. These bodies are ef- where the Ann Arbor Police Depart- 5. Guarantee of academic freedom for
fective in their own fields. The cam- ment has taken unjust and discrim- all and education for. democracy
pus needs a body through which it j inatory action against university stu- through real student self-government.
can voice its general opinion. The 'dents. 6. Cooperatives, low cost dormitories,
Student Senate is designed to meet A resolution against any censorship and fair wages for student workers.
that need. Factionalism necessarily of the Daily with equally strong con- Charles Buck

0

4

- -r - -_

N EW STYLES

FI R S T

AT WILD'S

TICop

Ccat

f

FOR A

You'll know it's time to buy
that topcoat you need for
Spring, the minute you see the
handsome styles we've just add-
ed to our stock. Here's distinc-
tion in fabric and pattern -
here is smart tailoring of true
English inspiration that cannot
be overlooked. See these rich
looking coats, try their on-
then marvel that they can be
yours at -
REVERSIBLE TOPCOATS
$18.50 fNg
is 3}{;}: f"?.:'
ENGLISH BALS .... $25.00
COVERT BALS . . . $35.00
CAMEL HAIR .. .. $35.00
SEASON SKIPPERS . $45.00

I

er ect

Cr ormiwce

IN SMOKING PLEASURE

t

BeforeandafterseeingBETTEDAVIin"DARKVICTORY"y.or soon to
enjoy Chesterfield's Happy Combination
of the world's best cigarette tobaccos
Thanks to their can't-be-copied blend Chesterfields are refresh-
ingly milder, taste better and have a more pleasing aroma.
Chesterfield gives you just what you want in a cigarette.
When you try them you will know why Chest-
erfields give millions of men and women more
smoking pleasure ... why THEY SA TISFY

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan