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March 25, 1939 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-25

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... « .._ .. .. # .r 4

ATJDAs, MARCH 25, 1939

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Engineers On War Path Nazi Teachers
In Feud With Lawyers P
Pro agandists,
The entire engineering college will i
hold a council of war Tuesday in the C a e s4Ase rt
Union to prepare for the annual Slide
Rule-Crease Ball battle Friday, March
31, (Continued from Page 1)
The occasion is the first all-class - --
engineering smoker, which has been as "being full of contempt for the
described as the "biggest bull session Amrican people." Otitbraks occurred
this campus ever saw," by Allen An- during his sreeches in Chicago, Cin-
drews, '39E, of the Engineering Coun- cinnati and Boston.
cil. Arcaciy mentiond in this series,
It is hoped that the smoker will Prof. Camillo von Klenze has served
become an annual event, Wesley War- as recruiting agent for American Col-
ren, '39E, president of the Council, legians desiring to spend their junior
explained, and he urged all engineers' years in Munich.
to be present. Paid by the German government,

Slosson Tells Of Regimentation
Of Italians By Patriotic Mottoes

Conservationistss
Fio1ht Land Act
Knox Bill Bitterly Opposed
By State Authorities
Conservation authorities through-
out the state were rallying their forces
yesterday against the bitterly con-
tested Knox Land Bill which is ex-
pected to reach the floor of the Sen-
ate next week. Opposition to the bill
has been steadily built up since its
passage last week by a large majority
in the House.
The Knox Bill, known as House Bill
229, proposes to amend the act passed
by the 1937 legislature which set up
a new land office board which was
given jurisdiction over all the tax de-
linquent lands in the southern half
of the lower peninsula that later went
to the state in the last tax sale dur-
ing the spring of 1938.

von Klenze assures' American news-
papermen that he has no bias for or
against Nazi Germany. "You must
not beco~me pro-German or anti-
German." he told a group of students
before they sailed, the New York
Times reported.
Union 1()Sponsor
Union POS
FinalBridge Meet
Entries are now being taken for the
all campus bridge tournament to be
held Tuesday, April 4, in the main
ballroom of the Union, it was an-
nounced yesterday by Hadley Smith,
'40E, Union committeeman. The tour-
nament will be the third, and last of
a series during the current school
year.
A fee of ten cents will be charged
for each entrant, Smith said. The
team having the highest average score
in any two of the three tournaments,
he said, will be awarded the all-
campus bridge trophy later in the
spring.

(Editor's Note: This is th'e second in
a sries of three articles reporting the
b ervations of Prof. Preston Slosson
on ccnditions in Europe.)
By HERVIE IIAUFLER
,Mussolini's use of patriotic mottoes
as a propaganda technique to keep
the Italian nation at a high pitch of
war fervor is revealed in a letter
received here from Prof. Preston Slos-
son of the history department, now
traveling in Europe.
Passages from Mussolini's writings
and speeches are stenciled on almost
every other building in Northern
Italy, Professor Slosson observed. The
favorite ones seem to be "Believe,
Obey, Fight," "We dotdonot discuss
our frontiers; we defend them," and
"The more foes the more honor."
Mussolini's aspirations for Italy
are hammered home, Professor Slos-
son believes, by the repetition of such
statements as "We shall make Italy
the leading nation in the world" and
"He who does not die for his faith is
unworthy to possess it."
A hint of the regimentation im-
posed upon Italy is included in Profes-
sor Slosson's description of Rome.
Mussolini decreed that drivers were
not to blow their automobile horns in
Rome, and Professor Slosson notes
that "after forty hours in Rome I have
still to hear the first toot."
Another achievement of Mussolini
described by Professor Slosson is the
development of an appearance of
Italian wealth. "Italy has"a magni-
ficent 'facade'," he writes. "Italy
looks wealthy now; it no longer
thrusts poverty and dirt and beggary
in the tourist's face as it did a gen-
eration ago.

Professor Slosson adds, howeverj
that "an American who has been herel
for years and knows Italy beneath thet
surface tells me that the actual con-
dition of the peasants is probablyt
worse under Fascism, on account of
the high taxes, than before. The slums
in the cities are tucked away in back
alleys where one must seek them out,
but they are still slums."
The constant refrain of Mussolini's
stenciled mottoes, Professor Slosson
says, becomes extremely wearisome.
"It was such a refreshing contrast in
Southern France," he writes, "to come
across some monarchist signs crudely
scrawled in black paint on walls that
I felt now at last I am again in a
free country where men can put ut
signs that the government does not
approve."
Ten Foresters
To Make Tour
Rainsdell, Senstius Lead,
Study Of Appalachians
Completed plans for the annual
spring semi-official tour of upper
class forestry students were an-
nounced by Prof. W. F. Ramsdell, who
will lead the tour this year.
The trip is traditionally taken by
students who wish to become ac-
quainted with activities of forestry
and conservation in the Appalachian
section of the country. The members
of the party, comprising Professor
Ramsdell, Prof. M. W. Senstius, of
the geology department, and ten stu-
dents, will make the trip during
spring vacation.
Among the points of interest to be
visited is the Asheville, N. C., forest,
which is the headquarters of the
Appalachian Forestd Experiment Sta-
tion. An interesting side light on this
forest, which was the first to be
established in this region, according
to Professor Ramsdell, is the fact that
the nucleus of the forest proper was
the old Vanderbilt estate here, which
was well wooded as the result of a
private interest in forestry of its own-
er.
Among the men to be included on
the trip are Jack Rothacher, '39F&C,
W. B. Allen, '39, R. E. Leeson, '39,
Francis Schmidley, '40, George Stae-
bler, '39 and James Mitchell.

C

l
C

I

Booth Deadline Extended Limit Excursion Tickets
In response to numerous student Students purchasing special ex-
requests the deadline for submitting cursion tickets for Spring Vacation
Michigras booth plans has been ex- are warned by the Michigan Central
tended until Monday, it was an- I System that there is a 10-day limit
nounced yesterday by James V. Hal- on the. return ticket. This neans
ligan, '40F&C, booth chairman for that those buying tickets and leaving
the carnival. Booth plans should be
submitted to the student offices of 'Thursday, April 6 must return no
the Union, Halligan said. later than Saturday, April 16.
~Ii77 - ______________ __ _ tlli

- - -.-'

- ,
CLAIK.
W1r
YouAtoo willLmoo-

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--

THE ANN ARBOR FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS

CI r e s en t s

See the full-length Picture of
HEDY LA MARR
it. the

The Followinmg Orc.hestras for Your

GARGOYLE

DANCING

LEASURE~

Robert Steinlee,
Michigan Union Bldg.

THE ORCHESTRAS listed here have an

BILL BOYD'
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Boyd-Pierce Orchestras,
204 Nickels Arcade, Dial 3512.
lIERD'REV" RITZ
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Herbert Ritz. 618 Lawrence,
Dial 2-2735
HAL CARTER
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
University Orchestra Service,
507 S. 5th Ave., Dial 3937
EARL STEVENS
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
845 Brookwood, Dial 7813

earned reputation to uphold,

and are com-

CHARLIE ZWICK
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Charlie Zwick,
619 E. University. Dial 9038
HERM SALOMONSON
AND ORCHESTRA
University Orchestra Service,
507 S. 5th Ave., Dial 3937
-'

Il'

44

MARCH ISSUE
OUT MARCH 28

4

posed of more than 85 t University stu
dents. Engaging one of these 'fine bands

lends a distinctive touch

to any dance.

BILL GAIL
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Bull (lail, 228 S. Thayer
Dial 2-2992

You Rire assured of good music, of contracts
being fulfilled to the letter plus the full
support and co-operation of the Ann Arbor
Fedcraitio n of Musicians, Local No. 625,

READE PIERCE
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
204 Nickels Arcade, Dial 3512
Boyd=Pierce Orch. Service.
BILSAWYER
AND HIS BAND
Bill Sawyer, 710 Arbor
Dial 2-1138

ON
SATURDAY NITE
THE BIGGEST
DOLLAR
is at the LEAGUE!
A whole evening of DANCING
for ONE DOLLAR!
A NEW ORCHESTRA
DILL GAIL'S
KAPPA ALPHA THETA OCTET and KAPPA NU
Reserve a table! 9:00-12:30 A.M.
CIGAN LE=AGUE

1A" (-,),(

BILL McKAY
AND HIS ORCHESTRA

CLARE SALTZ and
HIS PEPPER SHAKERS
114 Ford, Ypsilanti
Phone 461W

Ml

Wn. Burroughs, Law Club
Dial 4145

U

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Now You Bear the Cost But You Still Get the Results!

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