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March 23, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

P.r si

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TftrUR. i: iDi. i ii :'2; 19$

Name Arthur Klein
For Speech Contest
y "tedy t- in ir c:1nt 1vttj ieganin
the Noitherii rihatotca Llagie con-i
test t be held at ti University of
Iowa May 5, according to Prof. Louis
M. Eich.
He won the honor for his speech
"Baby, Tell Me How To Belong."
Prof. Gail E. Densmore, Professor
Eich and Herbert C. Weller, of the
speech department, acted as judges.
Other contestants were Oliver Cra-
ger, '39; William Muehl, '41, and
Louis Poplinger, '39.

Barbour Scholars Shown Here To Return For Service In Orient 225 Applications Are Received
4 For A inmi eholarhip Awarids

'I

iFro a n a5 ppi at-obs fuI i j i gan :pmited i Tiese clubs are
uiiv r3, of 4ip11ii A iii1 U in dree t contact with desirable stu-
dergraduate Scholarships are now dent prospects for the University.
under consideration by Dr. C. S. The three bases for awarding the

Librarians Plan Supper
The Ann Arb~or Junior librarian
Club will hold a. Pot Luck Supper at
Room of the Gvaduate School. A
ihngqiien=r~ are being handled by
Frances Vivian, Grad., Marian *?j
McAmbley, Grad., and Donald Rod,
Grad.
H. W. CLARK
English Boot and Shoe Maker
S Our new repair department,.the
best in the city. Prices are right.
438 South State and Factory on
South Forest Avenue.
-

Yoakum, vice president of the Uni-
versity in charge of educational in-
vestigations, it was announced yes-
terday by Robert O. Morgan, council
seei (ary of the Alumni Association.
'Te s holarships are granted an-
nually to 75 graduates of accredited
high schools in Michigan by the
Board of Regents, under the direction
and supervision of Dr. Yoakum.
Recommendations for the scholar-
ships, all ofwhich were filed by March
15, come from the 45 alumni and
alumnae organizations in the State,

scholarships, which are potentially
worth tuition for four years, plus
remission of semester fees, are finan-
cial need, scholarship and character.
A rune year scholarship is originally
granted, but this is continued for
four years depending upon satisfac-
tory scholastic average.
Actual recipients this year will be
announced by Dr. Yoakum not later
than May 15. About 190 students,
representing all four classes, are now
attending the University on these
scholarships, Morgan stated.

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

WANTED
WANTED+Old copies of Michigan
Daily for Sunday, April 3, 1938, and
Friday, March 18, 1938. Call. Mrs.
Rogers, 2-3241. 458
WANTED-Clothing wanted to buy.
8 u i t s, overcoats, typewriters,
watches. Sam pays the most. Phone
6304 for appointment. 388
WANTED VOTES-Vote for better
lighting in the library by electing
Frank Dubell to Student Senate,
March 31. 493
WANTED-Textbook for Political
Science 52, Government of Fascist
Italy. Call Ed, phone 6092. Thanks.
541
WANTED--Three tickets for Nation-
al Collegiate Swimming Meet. Call
Morin, 2-2171. 537
WANTED--Speech book, The Work-
ing Principles of Argument by
O'Neill and McBurney. Bob Wg-
ner, 2-2565.
BEAUTY PARLORS
JUANITA'S HOUSE of Beauty, ex-
perienced complete service, reason-
able prices. Phone 3023, 410 Wol-
verine Bldg., 4th and Washington.
514
MONTH-END SPECIAL-Regular $6
Eugene permanents $3.50. College
Beauty Shop, phone 2-2813, open
revenings. 531
MOVING SERVICE
MIOVING-A and C Cartage, storage.
Local and long distance hauling.
Every load insured. 325 S. Fifth,
Phone 9835. 522
ELSIFOR Cartage Co., Inc., local and
long distant moving, storing, pack-
ing, shipping. Every load insured.
310 W.. Ann Phone 4297. 526
H. B. GODFREY Moving, storage.
Local and long distance moving.
410 North Fourth Ave. Phone 6927.
525
DECORATORS
HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
painting. Budget plan if desired.
Dial 7209. 181
PAINTING and Decorating, interior
and exterior. Cleaning windows,
walls, woodwork washed. Guaran-
teed. Reasonable. References. Phone
2-1280 8-6. 548
PAINTING Paperhanging, wall wash-
ing, paper cleaning and all interior
and exterior decorating. First class
.workmen. Phone W. P. Jacobson,
2-1320. 517
REAL ESTATE
GRANGER Avenue-Six rooms with
.arge living room and fireplace and
three good sized bedrooms. Garage
Priced reasonably with terms. Ed-
ward M. Couper, Realtor, State
Savings Bank Bldg. Phone 2-1322.
510
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
TO SWAP-New guitar for what have
you. Call Yale Coggan, 6738 at 616
Church. 505
FURNACES VACUUM cleaned and re-
paired. Carl Sweet, 2-3578. Succes-
sor to Carl Heinzelman, formerly
Marshall Furnace. 518
BLACK DIRT and manure. Also ashes
and rubbish hauling. Work guaran-
teed satisfactory. H. Tolman. Phone
2-2926. 523
SPECIAL-Paste Waterless Cleaner.
Was $1 gal, now 79c. Factory Paint
Store. Phone 2-2440. 516
CARPETS CLEANED, sewing and

laying. Oriental rugs washed. Amer-
ican Rug Cleaning Works, Green
St. Phone 8115. 5201

L -

EL
SF
D
Mon., Tues., Wed., 50c

Croquignole Specials

The above photographs are of the Levi Barbou r Scholars for the year 1938-1939 and three of the fornieti
scholars now resident in Ann Arbor. Seated left to right are Mrs. Joseph Yamagiwa of Japan, a former scholar;
Esperanza Castro and Gloria Cortes, both of the Philippine Islands; Amna Ali of India; Primitive Ilemandante
of the PhiliIxpine Islands; Vung-yuin Chang of China. First row standing: Sada Kato of Japan; Nakibe Topuz
and Behice Sadik, of Turkey; Choon-cha Lee of China; Kamala Kosambi of India; Mrs. Carmen Velas-
quez -of the Philippine Islands, a former scholar; Celia Chao of China. Second row: Toyoko Nagashima, of
Japan, former scholar; Civili Sinhanetra of Siam; Su- Hsuen Wt, Phoebe Wei, Ilsi-yin Sheng and Ming-chen
Wang, all of China; Kikue Oshima and Naomi Fukuda, both of Japan; Katherine Tseng of China. Back row,
Yao Shen, Louise Chang, Tuh-wei Chang, Victoria Kiang, Poe-eng Yu, Bing-chung Ling, Violet Wu and
Jean Chu, all of China.
ScholarShips Help East Meet West

UGENE OIL-
H ELTON-
AACH I NELESS-
UART-
SHAMPOO &
FINGERWAVE

$350
Thur., FiA., St., 65c

CAMPUS BEAUTY SHOP
PHONE 2-1379 711 N. UNIV OPENING EVENINGS

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4.-.._

_________________ ____________________________________________________________________ - ------ - I

By MALCOLM LONG
Taking an education in America
back for service in the Far East and
bringing the East and the West into
closer contact are two of the benefits
accomplished by the foundation of
the Barbour Scholarships for Orien-
tal Women, according to University
officials.
Announcement of the appoint-
ments for the coming year will be
made next week, Prof. W. Carl Rufus,
secretary of the Scholarship Com-
mittee and adviser to the Scholars
said yesterday.
Seeing at first hand the excellent
work being done by three Orientalf
women trained at the University of
Michigan and realizing the great op-
portunities for women in the Orient,
Levi L. Barbour, '63, '65L, conceived
the idea of the Barbour Scholarships
for Oriental women.
Barbour, while on a trip in the Far
East, observed the work of Dr. Oda
Kahn and Dr. Mary Stone of China,
and Dr. Tomo Inouyi of Japan in

the field of medicine. On his re- expenses, only for the academic year.
turn to the United States, he estab- All travel, vacations and personal

lished the scholarships and later in-
vested some $650,000 for the founda-
tion.
Approximately 25 awards are made
annually to women of Oriental na-
tionality without racial or religious
requirements. The women are select-
ed on the basis of scholastic attain-
ment, ability to use the English lan-
guage for study and classroom pur-
poses, marked ability in a special
field and a desire to return to her
native land for service after suitable
preparation is made. Selection is
made by a committee composed of the
President of the University, the Deans
of the Graduate School, the College
of Literature, Science and the Arts,
the Medical School and the Dean of
Women.
Awards are made annually but fre-
quest reappointments are made up to
four years. The stipend amounts to
$650 a year and University fees,
which covers expenses, the students

VA

expense must come from the students
personal resources.
Most interesting are the two quali-
fications that appointments, except
in unusual circumstances, are made
only to unmarried women, and that
appointment is subject to admission
to the United States under the "Stu-
dent Section" of the Immigration Act.
This latter provides for the entry to
this country of foreigners who come
only for a specified period and for
the specific purpose of study.
-4
11.
of theit .
in the Unct
"Chesterfield
of the finest a
choicest'of se
ins the correct
qualities of e
SC h
- mo

I

BILL BOYD
and his Orchestra
at your House-Party
deotes Prestige, Indiuiduality, and a
Perfect Musical Evening.
BOYD-PIERCE ORCH ESTRA SERVICE
204 Nickels Arcade Dial 3512

i1

11

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F

219 SOUTH MAIN

STREET

'I

SIX STEPS TO
MORE SMOKING
PLEASURE
AGEING-Chesterfield's mild
ripe tobaccos, like fine wines, are
aged for two or more years in huge
wooden casks. Here they gradu-
ally acquire that true Chesterfield
nildness and bettertaste which give
millions of smokers more pleasure.
STEMMING-"Almost human"
is what they say about the inter-
esting stemming machines, whose
fingers pick up the tobacco, leaf
by leaf and take out the stem,
leaving only the mild, tender,
good-tasting part of the leaf to go
into the making of Chesterfields.
BLENDING--There is only one
Chesterfield blend ... the blend
that can't be copied . . . a happy
combination of the world's best
American and Turkish tobaccos.
Just the right proportions to make
Chesterfield a milder, better-tast-
ing cigarette
PAPER-Every Chesterfield you
smoke iswrapped inpurecigarette
paper...the finest cigarette paper
made. That's another reason why
Chesterfields are milder and bet-
ter-tasting.
z
MAKING -Almost faster than
the eye can follow, Chesterfields
come rolling out of the marvel-
ous cigarette making machines.
Chesterfields are always round, firm
and well-filled.

tParis ata
Little Price,11
Our magnificent collec-
tion of Spring hats gives
you the most flattering,
exciting hats of the season!
They're a thrill to see . . . a
delight to try on. With all
eyes on your hat this
Spring-be sure to see our
smart new models.
$2.9.5 up
SCHILLER
MILLINERY

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of the package...
Cigarettes are a balanced blend
aromatic Turkish tobacco and the
veral American varieties blended
proportion to bring out the finer
ach tobacco."
When you try them you will know why
esterfields give millions of men and women
re smokingpleasure... why THEY SATISFY

RADIO
SERVICE
ANY MAKE

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