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March 17, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

>rence Lauds.

Runs Against Kipke

Co-Operatives
As A Balance
Terms Movement A Mean
Between Collectivism
And Laissez-Faire
(Continued from Page 1)
stantially better than those in the
capitalistic enterprises
Low operating costs, resulting from
small salaries to officials, low ad-
vertising expenditures, low rent and
a small return on investments; large
scale organization-there are over 1,-
000 individual societies in Great Brit-
ain; and a great degree of coopera-
tion between the individual societies
help the system to function eff cient-
ly.
But there are, Professor Florence
emphasized, definite weak points,
which are traceabel to a shortsight-
ed, undiscriminating. belief in de-
mocracy. The members of the co-
operatives have a fear of the system
becoming undemocratic and thus shy
away from the hiring of experts,
skilled in various branches of man-
agement and merchandising. In a
system employing 200,000 persons
there are only. six college graduates,
all others having worked their way
up on a seniority basis. Consequent-
ly the managers of the industry are
mainly those who have worked in it
since they, were 14 years old and
have reached the top because of their
seniority rating.
Not having minds able to develop
new ideas in production, the quality
of the cooperative products is far be-
low that of the capitalist products.
They display a great lack of knowl-
edge in advertising and marketing
methods, and capital, because of lack
of knowledge and initiative is great-
ly underutilized. It is these faults in
the system which must be remieded,
Professor Florence said, if it is to
continue, the progress it has made in
the past.

Television Pictur
To Cathod-Ray
By KARL KESSLERC
Remarkably clear pictures repro- I
duced by the modern television re-I
ceiver are made possible by the use of
the cathod-ray vacuum tube, Prof.
Lewis N. Holland of the electrical en-
gineering department declared yes-
terday.
The cathod ray tube is a funnel-f
shaped tube with a flat screen at the
large end. The picture is projected by
a fast-moving beam of electrons
which light up the flourescent screen.
This beam, which is shot out from
the small end of the tube, travels
back and forth across the screen, and
at the same time moves up and down,
coverin'g the whole field in a series of
441 horizontal lines. As the spot of
light races across the screen, it be-
comes lighter or darker, according to
the shading of the picture at that
point.(
The whole picture is thus covered
at the rate of 30 frames per second.
Motion pictures show 24 frames per
second. At such high speeds, the eye
no longer perceives a complete pic-
ture.
Since even this high speed produces
a slight flicker effect, engineers have
devised a novel method to fool the
eyes. Instead of running through the

es Owe Clarity Hootkins Will Speak
At Suomi Meeting!
SVacuu System Prof. Hirsch Hootkins of the French;
department will address the Suomi
been successfully used in England. Club at 8 p.m. today in Lane Ha,,.
The mirror is so mounted that it has William Sahi, '40E, will play several:
a natural frequency of vibration cor- polkas and schottisches on the har-
responding to the scanning speed of monica and Matty Lappinen of Ypsi-
the transmitter. The great advan- lanti will present a group of FinnishI
tage of such a system over the cathod folk songs.
ray type lies in its more compact and E
cheaper construction. READ THE WANT ADS

Students To Plan
New Peace Program
Students intereste -in continuing
the peace demonstrations of former
years will hold a meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Monday in Lane Hall to make defi-
nite plans for a demonstration to be
held here April 20 in conjunction with
similar nation-wide activities
The tentative program of the stu-
dents includes support of an anti-
war referendum on the basis of the
Ludlow Amendment.

Henry X. Strauss, brother of the
late Prof. Louis Strauss of the Eng-
lish department, died Monday in
Hollywood, Fla., where he was spend-
ing the winter, according to notice
received here yesterday. Mr. Strauss'
home was in Chicago.
Professor Strauss died Sept. 27.
Previously, he served for many years
on the faculty and earned the ad-
miration of thousands of alumni.

-

I.

SHOWS DAILY AT2-4-7 -9 P.M.
STARTING TODAY!

THREE WOMEN OF THE

SKY!

DR. DEAN W. MEYERS

Regent Candidates
To SpeakMarch 27
Dr. Dean W. Myers of Ann Arbor
and Charles C. Lockwood of Detroit,

Feature Starts
2:31 --4:26-7:31 -9:31

Democratic candidates for the Board'
of Regents, will speak at the Wash-
tenaw County Democratic Committee
dinner to be held here March 27, Wil-
liam A. Walz, chairman of the com-
mittee, announces yesterday.
Other Democratic state candidates
to address the banquet are Thomas
J. Murphy and Clarence D. Dwyer
who are running for the State
Supreme Court, T. Thomas Thatcher
and Edna Cornell Wilson, both can-
didates for the State Board of In-
struction, and Benjamin H. Halstead
and Albert L. LaLonde who are seek-
ing positions on the State Board of
Agriculture.
The Washtenaw Committee will
meet Saturday, March 18, to discuss
detailed plans for the dinner.

picture by scanning successive lines,
modern sets are built to take first thej
even lines, then the odd lines through
the whole picture. Thus while the~
spot moves through only 30 complete
frames a second, it has the appear-
ance to the eye of double that num-
ber.
The size of -the picture projected
will vary with the price of the set. The
smaller ones are about 2 by 21/2
inches, and the largest is about 7/2 by
10 inches wide. The picture may be
viewed directly or through a mirror
on top of the cabinet. Otherwise, the
television receiver will resemble an
ordinary consoleradio.
The cathod ray system, though it
appears to be the most promising
method and the one most widely used
today, is by no means the only one
in sight.
A system making use of a vibrat-
ing mirror and a bright beam of light
in place of the electron beam has
Robert Lodge Named
To N.Y. Alumni Post
Robert E. Lodge, '39, co-founder of
the now defunct Panorama, has been
elected secretary-treasurer of the U.
of M. Alumni Club of New York.
Lodge, who replaces Beach Conger,
is married to Joan Hanson, '40, first
editor of Panorama. Conger quit his
position following a promotion on
the New York Herald-Tribune staff.
Both he and Lodge are former Daily
staff members.

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brve, Young# becaiful"*
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Classified Directory

11

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSI FI ED
ADVERTISING
RATES

Heywood, 414 Maynard St., phone
5689. 271
EXPERIENCED Typist, can copy-
read, edit. Rates reasonable. Tele-
phone 5126. 447

Effective as of February 14, 1939
CASH ON LY!
12c per reading line (on basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
30c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
These low rates are on the basis
pf cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 10c.
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop in at 420 Maynard
Street.
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox- darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
WANTED - TYPING
TYPING-Reasonable rates. L. M.

FRED DICKENS-Typing and sten-
ography, experienced. 625 E. Lib-
erty, Apt. 1 (over Krogers.) Phone
2-1129. 4461
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 S.
Main. 311
WANTED-Clothing wanted to buy.
S u i ts, overcoats, typewriters,
watches. Sam pays the most. Phone
6304 for appointment. 38
HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
painting. Budget plan if desired.
Dial 7209. 181
WANTED-Young woman compan-
ion for few hours each day-pre-
ferably with car. Phone 9551 be-
fore 10 a.m. or 12 - 2 p.m. 449
WANTED-A student to work for
room for remainder of semester.
Reply Box 11 atDaily. 448

I.

Ogthe 'levyel.
Uare
DON AMECHE
as a singing, loving,
fighting 'Artagnanl
THERITZ BROTHERS
phoneys pinch-hitting for Athos
Porthos and Aramist

.

I.

in
A Musical ComedyVersion of
ALEXANDRE DUMAS'
EIo ~

Shamrock Center Brick

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Pistachio Shamrock molded in
Vanilla Ice Cream will give
the touch of perfection to your
St. Patrick's party.
Only.. .3_3 C
QUART BRICK

i

III

O with
BINNIE BARNES
GLORIA STUART
PAULINEMOORE : o
Joseph SCHILDKRAUT
0 A 20th Century-Fox Picture┬░
* e
Popeye Cartoon
Novelties - News
Sunday
AGNEW Orchestra-on stage

our oo9' l-e
~Footbal Romeo .
SSOON LIJES"
COMING OO LO
"yXSrT. OI ~

On Sale at All

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Superior Dairy Stores
332 South State - 1211 South University - 207 South Main

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CLASSIFIED

ADVER.. TISING

In

Your Daily for Four Days, March 21

-25

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