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March 10, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, ri

LWOW.....

will "catch" it in Ann Arbor and
carry on from here.
The 'program will begin in Ann
Arbor with askit dealing with Made-
Ion Stockwell, '72, first woman to re-
ceive a degree at the University. Miss
Stockwell, now Mrs. Turner, is living
in Kalamazoo.
Next a group of students will act
the story of Dr. Me-Iung Ting, '20M,
her recent arrest in China at the
hands of the Japanese, her ultimate
release and the important part played
by the University in the dramatic in-
cident. The line of protest stretched
from China to Ann Arbor, from the
University through President Ruth-
ven to Senator Vandenberg, thence
to the state department and finally
back to Tokyo, where the order was
issued for Dr. Ting's release.
Despite the "old-time" atmosphere
- of the program, emphasis is placed
- on student participation, as the en-
I tire program is being put on by stu-
dents. Following Dr. Ting's story will
be a narration sequence between an
old alumnus and a student now on
campus, which will show the growth
of the University and the present
breadth of its scope of activities.
t Each dialogue will lead to a song,
with the Valrsity Glee Club, Girls Glee
Club and Varsity Band providing the
music. "Varsity," "The Victors,"
"The Yellow and Blue" and a Michi-
gan medley will be among the selec-
tions rendered. The Baird Carillon
I will, be heard sounding Michigan's
"Laudes Atque Carmina."

Players Becore' .Elzabethans

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

By ETHEL NORBERG
While Prof. Valentine B. Windt,
director of Play Production, and his
assistant director, Sarah Pierce, di-
rect their cast for the coming "Two
Gentlemen of Verona" on the rickety
stage of the Laboratory Theatre, the
dusty classroom boards shake under
the weight of actors learning deep
court curtsies and elegant Elizabeth-
an bows.
With seven Shakespearian produc-
tions to its credit Play Production
has begun rehearsal with a vengeance
on this play, the fourth comedy by
William Shakespeare to be present-
ed under the direction of Professor
Windt. The play will be presented
Wednesday through Saturday, March
29 to April 1.
Although one of the poet's earliest
works and consequently lacking the
maturity of the later comedies seen

at the University-notably "Twelfth
Night" and "The Taming of the
Shrew"-"Two Gentlemen of Verona"
far excells the other early Shakes-
pearean plays in dramatic power and
beauty of verse, accoirding to Pro-
fessor Windt.
The play will be staged on a unit
set, built in a series of levels and
arches, rather than on a series of
realistic settings.
In addition to Play Production, two
other University departments will aid
in the production of the play. Mem-
bers of the School of Music and danc-
ers from the physical education de-
partment will also participate. Thor
Johnson of the School of Music will
conduct the Little Symphony Or-
chestra in the entricate and inciden-
tal music and music students will sing
the songs in the play, among them
the famous "Who Is Silvia?"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
CASH ONLY!
12c per reading line (on basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.-
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
We have a Quick Delivery Serv-
ice at your disposal if you wish to
have your ad picked up (10c
extra).
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop in at 420 Maynard
Street.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Furnished two room
apartment. Electrically equipped
kitchenette, dressing closet. Roll-
away bed, bath, shower, porch. 602
Monroe.
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.f

neighborhood of Natural Science
Auditorium. Wednesday a.m- Call

7117. Reward.

435

WANTED - TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79
TYPING-Reasonable rates. L. M.
Heywood; 414 Maynard St., phone
5689. 271
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 S.
Main. 311

S u i t s, overcoats, typewriters,
watches. Sam pays the most. Phone
6304 for appointment. 388
HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
painting. Budget plan- if desired.
Dial 7209. 181
REFERENCE MAGAZINES - You
can get any magazines published
within last 45 years. Original price
plus postage. Drop card to Ruth
Rumbaugh, 533 N. Wells, Chicago,
for C.O.D. 434
Graduates Win Match
The weekly Union duplicate bridge
match was won last night by Jerome
J. Sievers, Grad., and Hugo V. HqJ-
erman, Grad., the same combination
that took top honors last week. The
next match will be held at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday in the Union.

Cabot States Group Medicine
Will Become Common Practice

WANTED-Clothing

wanted to buy.I

U

rl9a Ud[
feature and recommend

at

t Liberty
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ARROW SHIRT

'

Editor's Note: This is the third in a
series of articles in which Dr. Hugh
Cabot, former dean of the School of
Medicine, discusses the arguments pro
and con of group medicine.)
By RICHARD HARMEL
After carefully weighing the argu-
ments both for and against group
medicine, it is necessary to come to
the conclusion that the "grouping
of physicians as a method of offering
medical service" will become common
in the United States, Dr. Hugh Cabot,
dean of the School of Medicine, from
1921 to 1930, states in a recent issue
of a medical journal.'
Group medicine offers as its out-
standing advantage the ready oppor-
tunities for consultation by experts in
various fields, Dr. Cabot believes. The
situation today in private medicine
calls for consultation after consulta-
tion, a practice that is both time
consuming and costly.
Savings in overhead afford the sec-
ond great advantage. of group prac-
tice, Dr. Cabot says. Little does the
average layman realize that the
physician as well as the businessman
suffers heavy overhead expenses.
Such expenses account for 30 per
cent or 40 per cent reductions in the
income of the general practitioner
and in the case of some specialists,
60 per cent of the income.
With group practice, much need-
less duplication can be eliminated,
according to Dr. Cabot. Laboratory
upkeep offers as good an example as
the expenses necessary to maintain
an efficient personnel which is so
necessary to the "smooth operation
of medical practice."
Existing specimens of group prac-
tice illustrate how great the savings
can be from group organization, Dr.
Cabot points out. Such savings are
passed on to the patient "in the form
of reduced fees, to the physicians in
the form of increased net income or
both."
Raising of the general level of the
doctor's knowledge is considered by
Dr. Cabot as the third great advan-
tage of group practice. The private
practice physician usually is unable
to keep well informd about medical
progress, but in group practice he is
able to talk with his fellows and ab-
sorb it in a casual manner.
Regular work hours and adequate
8 ounces ......35c

22

ROTC Cadets
Named Captains

LOST
LOST - Lucy Elliott gold key in

vacations are assured doctors in group
practice, Dr. Cabot affirms. No
longer must the private physician
be a human work horse, because he
can transfer his share of the burden
to capable colleagues. The group
pactice doctor is able to attend im-
portant medical conclaves where pro-
gress in the fight against disease is
discussed.

Careful

Twenty-two ROTC cadets have
been named cadet captains for this'
semester, it was announced yester-
day by Major I. A. Crump, Adjutant
of the Ordnance Department.
They are: Jas. C. Appleyard, '39E;
William J. Archer, '39; Arthur Boett-
jer, '39E; Paul Brickley, '39; George
S. Cowing, '40E; Thomas G. Draper,
'39; Henry A. Fedziuk, '39E; Ralph,
L. Freeman, '39E; Lawrence Gay,
'39E; Robert S. Hansen, '40; George
Hansen, Grad.; -Walter J. Hinkle, '40,
The list continues: Bert Holtby,
'39F&C; John F. Johnson, '39; Jule
Limoli, '39E; Woodrow Marcus, '39E;
Thomas Nurnberger, '39Ed; Virgil R.
Owens, '39; Richard C. Parsons, '40E;
John A. Rinek, '39E; Willard F. Shel-
don, '39E and Theodore Zurhorst,
'40E.

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
Presents
"LIFE
ON"1
(Un Carnet Du Bal)
This Week -- Fri. & Sat.
March 10-11
Mendelssohn Theatre -. 8:15
Seats Reserved

work at low prices.

9y

MRS HALL'S
CUT-RATE DRUG STORE
231 SOUTH STATE AT THE HEAD OF LIBERTY
Prices Effective - Friday and Saturday, March 10 and 11
50 Pad Regular 15c Reg. lOc
Cigarettes
Matches CIGARETTES
OtC OS86C. elm.
115 n Includes - Marvels
5(plus tax) Sensation, Avalon
Includes - Luckys, Camels, 20 Grand, Wings,
1000 Strikes Chesters, Raleighs, O. G.'s, Paul Jones and
for a nickel Spuds. Domino
Pound of F
BRIGGS CANDY BARS
3 for 1 Oc Eastman and Agfa
98c Price Includes - Gums Cut-Rate Prices
Mints - Cough Drops
50c Dr. Lyons c10 6 Genuine
Tooth Sweetheart Tekamin Style
Tooth StartTAMPEX Tooth
Brushe1
28c- 5c 98c 49c
Limit One 4 for 19o 10 for 33c Made in America
Come in and inspect our display of "Early American Old Spice"
Marshall CutRateDrug
231 South State - At the Head of Liberty
Phone 5933-Free Delivery

III

I

..Tape Stripes for Spring
Designed particularly for college men,
this Arrow ensemble of shirt, tie, hand-
kerchief, and underwear is destined to
find it's way into every college man's
wardrobe.
Authentically styled to the minute,
tape stripes, spaced wide apart on a pastel colored
madras will make this Arrow shirt a must for a well
dressed 1939. Every shirt has the incomparable Arrow
collar, Mitoga shaped fit, and is Sanforized-shrunk
(fabric shrinkage less than 1%). In chalky colors of
blue, grey, and green. Get yours today-$2.50.
Arrow ties designed for these shirts ,.$1.HIB TS
AfO/ HIT

Sat. Matinee 2:30

25c

S .S
t M#ce':

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-SHOWS DAILY at 2-4-7-9 P.. -- MATS. 25c - EVES. 35c-

Doa*&itWJ oe"C~I

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7 Nieii ?
° + .:

STARTING TODAY!
..HERE COMES W R

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SAGAII

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SPRING SHOWING

of

ANN ARBOR FASHIONS

presented by

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
In Cooperation with the Following Shops:

Fischer's
LANOLIN
CREAM
LOTION
Contains pure lanolin
-non-sticky
Readily absorbed.
Prevent dryness
and you prevent
chap.

WE'VE DONE IT AGAIN!
Featuring:
* PI PHI -Sextet
* PHI KAPPA PSI
* ALPHA TAU OMEGA
and
CHARLIE ZWICK

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SCHILLER HAT

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ROBERT'S HAT

DANA
RICHARDSON

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ill II ~ fll 13flf 1 .lfl L. r........L I

S1/zpint .$.. 35c 1

of,* 41

Alk A & .-

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