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March 05, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,MA

Inspired Basketball Team Blasts Hoosier

Title Hopes,_53-45

PR ESS PASSES
By BUD BENJAMIN
(Editor's Note: The following piece is dated Feb. 15, which is about normal for a
letter to get from the office mail drawer into my hands. During my absence, the
writer noted that guest columns were to appear. A former sports writer at the Uni-
versity of Puerto Rico, he took the opportunity to pen a few notes. I'm glad he did.)
Latins Are Rabid Fans, Too .
By RAFAEL PONT-FLORES
WAS tricked into coming to the University of Michigan. Michigan alumni
in Puerto Rico talk about their Alma Mater as a prosperous business-
man gloats over his earnings, as a religious person eulogizes his creed. To
them the University of Michigan is the sum of all, that is best and finest
among institutions of higher learning. They can talk for hours on the
subject. I met quite a number of these crusaders. Some of them were poor
speakers, others stammered in casual conversation, others were in a hurry
to meet somebody. When I mentioned Michigan it seemed that the magic
word had been spoken. Poor speakers became modern Ciceros, stammerers
got their second wind, and those in a hurry would very gallantly offer me
a chair, a cigar (if available) and with a paternal look start the proceedings
with a smiling, "Now my friend, let me tell you something about that
heavenly place." With an eloquent and persuading speech, he then proceed-
ed to tell me everything with the zest and vigor of a hunter telling some
unfortunate chap about his hunting experiences.
To cut matters short, I asked them to give me two reasons why
I should come to Michigan. They were amazed at my request (they had
so many and (Iasked for so little) but, they were willing to oblige. (1) We
have the best football team in the country: (2) we have the Knost
beautiful girls in the world. That settled it. Tieing athletically minded
I decided to come to Michigan. In a hurry, too.
W HEN I arrived in Ann Arbor this past fall, first-hand information from
a well meaning room mate gave me the uncomfortable feeling that I
had been tricked. For years the University of Michigan had not had a
good football team and as far as girls were concerned four out of five
went someplace else. I started immediately to ┬░plan vengeance wholesale
on my return to Puerto Rico next June.
I was looking forward to my first football game with the anxiety
and expectancy of a kid on Christmas Eve. My previous experience on
this spectacular sport had been limited to radio broadcasts and mov-
ing pictures. Although I was feeling pretty eager I needed something
more. Already, my being here for a few weeks had infiltrated in me
the desire that Michigan must be the winner. The pre-game rally
found me, to my amazement, running down Liberty Street chasing I
do not know what. It really did not matter, as I found out later. But
still, that killing instinct that red-hot fans treasure in their innermosts
before meeting a traditonal foe, was nowhere to be found in the blood
stream of my human being. So I turned to my room mate once more.
In three easy lessons, two minutes apart, he described with a luxury of
details what Michigan State meant to Michigan rooters. In half an
hour, I was boilidg mad. I was clamoring for scalps and prophesizing
that the HOUR had come. The intervening hours until the game
started seemed like centuries.
WHAT happened at the game, everybody should know by now. Football
seemed a more exciting game than I had anticipated. It had color,
thrills and everything that one usually expects from a pageant. My only
objection is that for this particular game, the score was too close. Well,
maybe you can't have everything.
Later, I have had the opportunity to see hockey games and basket-
ball games. Both I enjoyed very much until Minnesota came to town.
A sad happening, but there is some hope for the future. At home we
say that "there is no evil that can exist for a hundred years nor a
country that can endure it." I do not know how wild gophers may
be (although I suspect, by now), but they can be tamed. Or at least,
they can be made to behave actually, like water pipes.
My vengeance plans have been greatly modified. In fact, they have
been completely altered. Michigan alumni were right. Everything they said
was the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Not only extra-
curricular activities are the cream of he crop, but the institution far sur-
passes all the good things I heard before coming here. Do not be surprised
at these statements. I am in training. When I get back, I'll 'join those

Puekmen Snap
Losing Streak
With 3-1 Win
Cooke Tallies Two Goals;
Ten Penalties Handed
Out In Ragged Game
(Continued from Page 1)
lini contest was able to keep clear of
the penalty box in last night's con-
test.
Coming back strong in the second
period after two minutes of play
Cooke took a pass from Ross and
brought the Wolverine's third goal of
the game. From then on the game
turned into a half-way skating meet,
both teams making a break for their
opponents goal but poor skating and
a fair amount of defense work put an
end to any scoring threat.
Jim Tobin and Art Carlson received
major penalties in this period when
they came to blows behind the Wol-
verine net. Lack of balance and Ref-
eree Reynolds removed both men be-
fore the fight had taken on a serious
aspect.
The Illini's only goal came in the
final period when Ziemba picked up
the battered puck in center ice then
proceeded to pass the sleeping Wol-
verine defense men and slipped the.
puck past a surprised "Spike" James.
This year's non-to-successful hock-
ey team will wind up the current ,',ea-
son with two games this week On
Wednesday they will meet a strong
squad from Sarnia while on Saturday
Capt. Les Hillberg and George Cooke
will play the last games of their col-
lege career when the Wolverines face
the Paris Athletic Club.
CONFERENCE VICTORY
IllinoiPos. Michigan
Beaumont G James
Fieldhouse D Calvert
Ziemba D Ross
Thompson C Hillberg
Sigerson W Chadwick
White W Cooke
Illinois spares: Jaworek, Kaufman,
Slater, Carlson.
Michigan spares: Tobin, Lovett,
Samuelson.
First Period
Scoring: Chadwick from Cooke
10:50. Cooke solo 13:55.
Penalties: Ross, Sigerson, Kaufman.
Second Period
Scoring: Cooke from Ross 1:40.
Penalties: Tobin, Calvert, Carlson,
Slater, Ziemba.
Third Period
Scoring: Ziemba solo 8:15.
Penalties: Cooke, Calvert.
Giants Leave Hot Springs
HOT SPRINGS, Ark., March 4.-
(M-The New York Giants, who have
been taking preliminary workouts
and baths here, packed up today and
left for their regular training camp
at Baton Rouge, La. Although sev-
eral of them were suffering from
heavy colds, Manager Bill Terry was
well satisfied with the results of the
conditioning period.

I i

TI

|I

Shot By Shot

11

Johnson, dribble in..........0
Rae, foul(W. Menkle) .......1
Thomas, dribble in ..........3
Pink, dog shot ...............5
.Pink, foul (Dro) ............6
Dro, foul (Beebe)....... ...6
Hluffman, long ..............6
Andres, push from circle......6
Rae, dog shot ...............8
Harmon, push shot .........10
Rae, tip-in ................12
Dro, tip-in...............12
Dro, side flip ..............12
Rae, one-hand side ........14
W. Menkle, side flip ........14
Andres, dog shot ...........14
Rae, hook shot............16
Huffman, dog shot.........16
Johnson, push shot........16
Rae, hook shot............18
Harmon, tip-in...........20
Pink, push from circle......22
!ohnson, under basket......22
Johnson, dog shot .........22
Pink, push shot side .........24
Rae, tip-in ................26
Rae, fouls (R. Menke) ......28
Thomas, push shot side .....30
Beebe, push from circle .....32
Armstrong, tip-in ..........32
Andres, hook side ..........32
W. Menke, dog shot ........32
SECOND HALF
Andres, push shot side ......32
Beebe, long...............34
Andres, set shot ............. 34
Armstrong, foul (Beebe) . . .34
Huffman, tip-in............34
W. Menke, tip-in..........34
Pink, foul (Huffman) .......35

2
2
2
2
2
3
5
7
7
7
7
9,
11
11
13
15
15
17
19
19
19
19
21
23
23'
23
23
23
23
25
27
29

Cunningham Beats
Lash In Two Mile
. NEW YORK, March 4-(1P-Glenn
Cunningham, the greatest miler of
them all, brought 14 000 Madison
Square Garden customers out of their
seats tonight as he let loose with a
sensational sprint for the last lap and
a quarter to beat Don Lash by a
stride in a special two-mile race in
9 minutes 11.8 seconds.
Gregory Rice of Notre Dame was
third and Tommy Deckard of Bloom-
ington, Ind., fourth and last in the
hand-picked field. Lash was timed in
9:12.2 and Rice, a stride behind him,
in 9:12.4.
Making his first two-mile start in
big-time competition, Cunningham
sprinted double his usual distance
and in doing so out-jockeyed abd out-
sped the Indiana State Policeman,
himself the most feared finisher in
distance running.

Andres, dog shot..........35
Thomas, foul (Johnson) 36.
Harmon, dog shot ..........38
Rae, push shot side . .......40
Andres, long ..............40
Armstrong, foul (Harmon) .. 40
Harmon, pivot shot ........42
Pink, behind head hook ....44
Thomas, tip-in ..............46
Harmon, foul (Andres) . ....47
W. Menke, foul (Smiek) .....47
Thomas, foul (W. Menke) .. .48
Andres, tech. foul (Smick) ..48
Pink, dog shot............50
Pink, foiul (Huffman).......51
Rae, tip-iin......... .......53

40
40
40
40
42
43
43
43
43
43
44
44
45
45
45
45

31
31
33
34
36
38
38

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Fresh Carrots, and Peas
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Homemade Apple Sauce
Homemade Cake
Fruit Jello
Homemade Pie
Ice Cream

Gedeon Stays Away
From Batting Drills
Upon Hoyt's Advice
RANDOM JOTTINGS FROM THE
BASEBALL NETS: Elmer Gedeon,
veteran first baseman, has decided to
postpone his batting practice debut
until after the Conference Track
Meet next weekend, upon the advice
of Charley Hoyt . . . A batted ball
in therleg would not be of much 1elp
to Elmer in his attempt to defend
his high hurdles title . . . Horace
Tinker, the ex-high school baseball
star from Battle Creek, who became
a very valuable substitute center for
Fritz Crisler last fall, is finally trying
out for his first love . . . "Tink" is
a powerfully built boy, with many
years of diamond experience and
will be hard to beat out for an out-
field berth . . . Nomination for the
hardest worker on the squad-Ralph
Bittinger . . . this junior pitching
candidate, besides doing more than
his share of mound work is always
ready to don the mask and mitt
when there is a shortage of catchers
The loss of Howard Mehaffey
may not be felt as much as was at
first feared . . . Clarence Bergsma,
another sophomore catcher, looks like
he has the stuff . . . Although he
hasn't shown much at the plate as
yet, the blond rookie appears to be
an excellent handler of pitchers and
has a strong and accurate arm.
( OCCMPANAQ

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