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October 03, 1937 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Gina Cigna Talented
In Oil Painting Also
Madame Gina Cigna's artistic tal-
ents first revealed themselves in
painting. At twelve she was sent'
to the Academy of Fine Arts in Paris
to develop this gift. During the six
years that she was there she was
honored by having the Academy ex-
hibit a number of her water colors
and oils.
"I preferred working in oils-espe-
cially I liked doing portraits," she
says.
One of the best she did was of
General Joffre, just at the close of
the World War. It was formally pre-
sented to him six months later. Her
favorite portrait, however, is one she
did of her father, who also was a
World War general.
"He commanded the Twenty-Sec-
ond Brigade of the French Army "i
Madame Cigna explained, "and he
survived 125 wounds."
EARLY SUCCESS IS DETRIMENT
Early success is a detriment rather
than an asset, in the opinion of Fritz
Kreisler. His own early success was
dearly bought, the great violinist
says, and he rates his success in later
life alone as meriting the name.

'Leads Boston Symphony'
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY--" .
twelve years conductor of Boston
Symphony ... an insatiable artist ...
wide range of interest in music.
brings out emotional depth and
splendor . . . fresh and vital treat-
ment . . . artistic personality has
brought organization to unsurpassed
heights ... "
WINS SOLO CHANCE
No plans had been made for public
appearance when Eugene List, 18-
year-old pianist, acting on his own
iniative.

Liehtenwanger' s-
Facts And Fiction
(Continued from Page l)

iu.s. But if anyone asks me which I'
love better of the two-just as its
hard for a man to tell whether he
prefers a blonde or a brunette, even
so I cannot choose between my
Guarnerius and my Stradivarius. In
the matter of violins I am and always
will be polygamous!"
One of the second fiddles in the
Cleveland Symphony has not al-
ways been a second fiddle. There
was a time, before the War, when
this man was concertmaster(prin-
ciple ciolinist) of a private orchestra
owned and operated by a certain
German nobleman in one of the lesser
kingdoms of the Empire.
Now the nobleman, it seems, was
an amateur musician with aspira-
tions towards fame as a composer.
But though his rank was disting-

Oboe Player Must,
Excel With Reeds
An oboe player, distinguished artist
though he may be, is only as good as
the reeds he can make, it is said by
musicians.
There comes a time in the life of
every player when he curses the day
he was marked for the oboe, for the
discovery has to be digested that his
musicianship and technique are com-
pletely at the mercy of his skill as a
reed maker.
After the exhilaration of glorious
performance must come long hours of
reed making for no professional oboe-
ist trust any hand but his own at this
delicate task.

I

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA-Appears in Ann Arbor for its seventh consecutive visit. The organiza-
tion, now more than half a century old, has been presided over by many outstanding conductors of the music
world. Dr. Koussevitzky's leadership for more than a dozen years has not only maintained but has augmented
the splendid record made by the orchestra, it is said by critics.

uished, his music was not; and the
orchestra, forced to play the stuff,
often had a hard time concealing
their lack of respect for the noble-i
man's creative genius. One day

while rehearsing a certain home- the part.
made product, the orchestra was "But, Your Expelle
stopped and our concertmaster sever- the exasperated violin
ly reprimanded for bowing a certain the way I always bow
phrase contrary to the markings in in Lohengrin."

ncy,
ist,
that

ITURBI TURNS CONDUCTOR
Jose Iturbi first attracted world
replied attention as an orchestra leader
"that is when he played 25 recitals in six
passage weeks in Mexico City. He appeared
in Ann Arbor last May

..

I- ___ _

NOTICES

The 1937 Fifty-Ninth Annual
CHORAL UNION
CO:NCERTS

The right is reserved to make such changes
in the programs or in the personnel of partici-
pants as necessity may require. Tickets are
sold at purchaser's risks, and if lost, mislaid,
or detroyed in any manner, the University
Musical Society will not assume responsibility,
nor will duplicates be issued.
Concerts will begin on Eastern Standard
time. Evening concerts at 8:30.
Holders of season tickets are requested to
detach the proper coupon for each concert and
present for admission (instead of the whole
ticket) .
Concerts will begin on time, and doors will
be closed during numbers. Late comers will
be required to wait until admitted.
Lost and found articles should be inquired
for at the office of Shirley W. Smith, Vice,
President and Secretary of the University,
University Hall.
Those who leave the auditorium during inter-
mission will be required to present their ticket
stubs .in ord to re-enter.
Traffic regulations will be enforced by the
Ann Arbor Police Department and the Building
and, Grounds Department of the University.

*

Rachmaninoff, Pianist
The Cleveland Orchestra

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27

ARTUR RODZINSKI, Conductor

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9

For obvious reasons, notices will
announced from the stage.

not be

The Steinway is the official piano of the
University Musical Society.

*
*
*
*
*
*

Richard Crooks,
Fritz Kreisler, V

iolinist

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29
Boston Symphony Orchestra

SCHEDULE OF PRICES
SEASON TICKETS
The prices of season tickets are $12.00, $10.00, $8.00 and $6.00.
Each season ticket contains a coupon good for $3.00 in exchange
for a season May Festival ticket, in accordance with a schedule
to be announced.
Three center sections, both on the main floor and in the
first balcony, $12.00 each. (These $12.00 tickets are designated
"Patrons' Tickets," and entitle the holder to the same location
for the next May Festival when exchanged in accordance with
a May Festival schedule to be announced.)
Two side sections both on the main floor and in the first
balcony, $10.00 each.
First sixteen rows in the second balcony, $8.00.
Back of the first sixteen rows in the second balcony, $6.00.
ORDER BLANK
CHARLES A. SINK, President
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Enclosed please find remittance of $.......... in payment
for ........ Choral Ur.ion tickets as follows:

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor WEDNESI
Ruth Slenczynski, Pianist
MON
Helsinki University Chorus
MARTTI TURUNEN, Conductor TUES
Gina Cigna, Soprano
FRI]
T[he Roth Quartet
THURSI

.

Tenor

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19

QAY, DECEMBER 8
DAY, JANUARY 10
DAY, JANUARY 18
DAY, JANUARY 28
DAY, FEBRUARY 17

;'

Gyeorges Enesco,

Violinist

TUESDAY, MARCH I

Season Tickets - 10 Concerts
tickets at $12.00 each $.......
tickets at $10.00 each $.......
tickets at $8.00 each .......
.tickets at $6.00 each .......
Total ....$........

Individual Concerts
Tickets: $2.50-$2.04--$1.50-$1.00
.....Sergei Rachmaninoff at $.
... .Cleveland Orchestra at $.

.....Richard Crooks at
..... Fritz Kreisler at

$.
$.

....Boston Orchestra at $.
Ru.ith S1pnezvnski a~t.........

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