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September 30, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-09-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1937

Preuss Decries
Protest Pickets
At Embassies
Calls Strike Tactic Futile
And Dangerous Policy
In Foreign Relations
(Continued trom Pz 1)
ment. It arouses resentment abroad,
creates international friction and
endangers the peace."
Professor Preuss explained that
there are no statutes existent now
that could adequately prevent such
picketing, but that nevertheless local
officials have on many occasions in-
terfered upon the complaint of the
representative involved and thus laid
themselves open to possible suits for
false arrest.
He denied that legislation outlaw-
ing such picketing would infringe
upon the cnstitutional rights of
freedom of speech and assembly. He
quotes Sen. Key Pittman, who said,
"Should people who may make
speeches which would not be subject
to punishment if made in a park, be
permitted to go to the front door of
an embassy and, make the same
speeches? ...
"I say that under the constitution,
anyone has a right to express his or
her opinion with regard to any ruler
or with regard to any government,
but I say that they have not
the constitutional right-if prohibit-
ed by law-to make an offensive
demonstration in front of an em-
bassy.. . that will bring the hatred
of the people of his (the ambassa-
dor's) country against our people."
Scouting the idea that the enact-
ment of such legislation implies sym-
pathy with principles of the govern-
ments involved, Professor Preuss
said:
In certain quarters the enact-
met of such legislation would be
construed as a yielding to pressure
from "dictatorial," "fascist," or "mil-
itaristic" governments. Is it not more
humiliating for this government to
be compelled to continually apologize
for undignified and futile demonstra-
tions which it is powerless to pre-
vent?
There is a question, Professor
Preuss believes, as to whether there
has developed a rule of international
law which would impose upon this
nation the obligation to prevent such
picketing.
A resolution prohibiting picketing
(other than that which is a result
of a bona-fide labor dispute) withi
5 00 feet of any embassy, consulate
or legation in Washington, D. C. was
lost in the House in the last days of
the legislative session.
S.R.A. Headline
Is Misconstrued
Complaints have been made to The
Daily of a headline in yesterday's
issue reading: "New S.R.A. To Take
Over Church Work."
Although the story was accurate,
the headline was construed by some
to mean that the Student Religious
Association wouldhultimatelyhsup-
plant Ann Arbor churches. The As-
sociation will rather attempt to work
out a program for campus religious
expression and social activity.
Martin Alexander Chosen
To Head Hillel Foundation
Martin Alexander, '39M, Samuel
Grant, '40, and Zelda Davis, '40, were
elected president, vice-president and
secretary-treasurer of the Hillel
Foundation at the Executive Council
meeting yesterday. Louise Samek,
'38, was chosen president of the Hillel

Players.
Plans for the year were discussed
,t the meeting and include an inten-
sive Miiembership drive to be culmin-
ated by a victory dinner.

Senator Borah Welcomes President Roosevelt To Idaho

Lecture Scheduled PLEDGES MUST REGISTER I Interfraternity Council,
Allpersons wishing to pledge a must register with the
On Dutc Painting' fraternity were reminded yesterday Room 306 of the Union.
On JutCI Pamtng by Bud Lundahl, '38, president of the, tration fee is one dollar.

that they
Council in
The regis-

(f
1

"Dutch Painting" will be the topic
of Prof. Alphons P. A. Vorenkamp's
illustrated lecture next Monday at
4:30 p.m. in the west gallery of Al-
umni Memorial Hall. His talk will in-
itiate the year's program of the Ann
Arbor Art Association.
Professor Vorenkamp, a member of:
the Smith College faculty, has doneI
special research in the art of the
Netherlands of the latter part of the
16th and 17th centuries. In addition
to teaching the history of Flemish,
he is the author of "History of Still
Life Painting in Holland in the 17th
Century," which was published in
Dutch.
The lecture will be free to members
of the Art Association and to all
University students, but a charge of
25 cents will be made to others.
New Evidence Uncovered
In Streicher Investigation'
Attorney-general staff members
cooperating in a grand jury investi-
gation of the Streicher murder were
reported to have uncovered important
new information yesterday as a result
of a public appeal for aid in the two-
year-old case.
Mrs. Richard Streicher, 31, moth-
er of the slain boy was put on the
stand yesterday in Judge George W.
Sample's investigation of the slaying.
An anticipated extension of time
for the proceedings brought post-
ponement of the October term of
circuit court. Jurors were notified
inot to report until called.

LUNCHEONS..
DINNERS . . . . . . . 60c
SUNDAY DINNERS.
SUNDAY SUPPERS

40c 65c 85c
75c 85c $1.00 $1.25
75c $1.00 $1.25
40c 60c 75c $1.00 $1.25

the dJaun ted tavern

I

417 East Huron Street

Dial 7781

HOURS:
Nights 5:30-7:30

AN INVITING DINING ROOM
BEST QUALITY OF FOOD
EXCELLENT COOKING

Noons 11:30-1:30

Sundays 12:30-7:30

i

I ""®

Senator William E. Borah, the first prominent Republican to take part in a welcome for President Roose-
velt in his transcontinental tour, said "I am delighted so many are present" as he faced the crowd of
10,000 persons at Boise, Idaho. The President, who was en route to Bonneville Dam, is shown here watching,
with Borah at the microphone.

J
fJ
Or tea f ?;

A
PROFESSOR
MARKING
PAPERS
SEPARATES

.

Pots Come Into Style Again
With Drive For Class Spirit'

ORCHESTRA REHEARSAL
First rehearsals for the sixth sea-
son of the Ann Arbor Civic Orchestra
will be held tonight in the Ann Arbor
High School Auditorium, Director
William R. Champion said yesterday.
An increase in membership over
the customary number of 40 is being
planned for this year.

d

Pots, those funny little skull caps
that distinguish freshmen from soph-
pmores and upperclassmen, although
officially departed from the Michigan
campus, are seen on the heads of
many of the class of '41, who are at-
tempting to get class unity through
pots so the freshmen can beat the
sophomores at the fall games.
It was last spring at the last meet-
ing of the Men's Council for the year
that it was decided not to require the
wearing of pots this year, because of
the difficulty, experienced in previous
years, of enforcing the rule requiring I
the slight headgears.
But, the class of '41 was not to be,
downed by the Men's Council. Several
of its members wanted pots, decided
to get them and encourage every
freshman to buy them.
"We're going to lick those sopho-
mores at the class games," one fresh-
men, registering for fraternity rush-
ing, told a junior member of the In-
terfraternity Council, "and we're go-
ing to lick them wearing pots. Tell
all freshmen you see to buy a pot,
will ya?"
Pots are almost as old as the
University itself. Back in the days
around the turn of the century, they
were worn by all students, each class
having a different color.
Then, it was decided that just the
freshmen would wear them. For many
years first year men would wear the
peculiar little caps until the annual
;pap bight held late in the spring of
the year.
Cap Night was one of the biggest
events of the University in the old
days. Practically every person at
Michigan would turn out for it, stu-
dents and faculty alike.
Cap Night was held in Sleepy Hol-
Nw, located in a ravine back of the
University Hospital. A huge bonfire
would be built and freshmen. would
rally around the fire and throw their

pots into it, signifying that they had
passed from freshmen standing into
that of sophomores .
Two years ago, when freshmen re-i
vived the pot tradition on their own
accord, after encouragement by the
Men's Council, 200 of the members of
the class of '39 stormed Moe's Sports
Store late one.Friday evening follow-
ing a Pep Meeting.
"We want pots," was the cry thatl
went forth. Pushing against the glass
doors of the store, the crowd of first1
year men extended far out into the
street. Finally, George Moe opened,
the door and in stormed the fresh-
men. More than 200 pots went over
the counter in exchange for a rain of
50 cent pieces.

A AIR SHOW
ANN ARBOR AlIRPORT-SUNDAY, OCT. 3
Featuring
J IMMIE GOODWIN-The Bayou Bat Man
(10,00-foot Leap on Bat Wings)
and his
DEVIL DODGERS "SUICIDE CLUB"
Auto Head-on Collision - Rollovers
Wall Crashes-Ski Jumps
Motorcycle Wall Crash
Parachute Jumps - Airplane Stunts

. . THEM INTO
Wk"J pits ut qthke hkerernL?
P g(EMIKER_
7aAe One omfe 1e7vI!A WEEK
314 South State Street
DEALER: New L. C. Smith, Corona and all makes of port-
able typewriters. Reconditioned and used office and port-
able typewriters of all makes bought, sold, rented, ex-
changed, cleaned, repaired. One of the largest and best
stocks in the State. Our Rental Purchase Plan will save
you money.
"If You Write, We Have It."
Since 1908 Phone 6615

Freshmen Urged
Gym Lockers

To Get
At Once

All freshman men who classified
in the gymnasium, boxing and wres-
tling groups are urged to obtain their
lockers and towels before these
groups begin practice, Dr. George A.
May. director ofWaterman Gym-
nasium, said yesterday.
After gymnasium classes start,
there will be no assignment of lock-
ers during the afternoons of class
periods, Dr. May stated.
These arrangements, he said, are
necessary to avoid confusion and loss
of practice time.
Locker and towel tickets for fresh-
man work in Waterman Gymnasium
are available at the Cashier's Office,
South Wing of University Hall.
The locker fee is $2. The towel fee,
which is refunded, is 50 cents.

15

"THRILLERS"

15

Benefit
Washtenaw Drum & Bugle Corps

Admission

1 Oc-25c

Free Parking

r _ --.--------- -

i

PROF. CRAIG IN LONDON
Prof. Cecil Craig of the mathe-
matics department is on leave in Lon-
don, England where he is studying
on a fellowship at the Galton Lab-
oratory in University College.

'~~1

.. Solve Y°lar
Ave 5r
tt l

NEW and CLEAN
Oand SUPPLIES

5Ccrettr
Shorthand
Typing
LEARN TYPING and
SHORTHAND now, thus in-
creasing your efficiency in col-
lege as well as fitting yourself
for future well-paid employ-
ment.
Day and Evening Classes
opening* Monday, October 4.

'
_
t
r

ir

S

Aril

" :,e'
" .;:
'. .- :;
'?
.._sr _'i _ I

V

And We DON'T Mean:
ROOMS
SCHEDULES
DATES

I

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