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January 30, 1938 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Weather
Continued unsettled; possibly
rain turning to sleet.

L

Sir igu

ttt

EditoriaL,
Beware
Of Freedom .. .
Silk Stockings
And War .. .

-ONNONOW

VOL. XLVIIL No. 94

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JAN. 30, 1938

PRICE FIVE CENTS

_______r___________________

PRICE FIVE CENTS

Blast In Italy
Kills Fifteen;
Many Injured
Explosion Of Munitions
Devastates Segni; Said
To Be Worst In History
Mussolini Arrives
To Survey Debris
SEGNI, Italy, Jan. 29.--(P)-The
worst munitions factory explosion in
Italy's recent history today killed at
least 15 workers and injured hundreds
of others, leaving Segni's business sec-
tion devastated as by an earthquake.
Nine died in the explosion and six died
in hospitals later.
Firemen toiling to extinguish fierce
flames in the powder plant ruins were
certain they would find additional
bodies when the heat and acrid
fumes were quelled enogh to permit
thorough search.
Residents Abandon Homes {
Soldiers, policeandfire fighters,
were the only occupants of the shat-
tered area in this town of 10,000 in-
habitants, 38 miles southeast of Rome.
Residents were forced to evacuate
their homes, many of them damaged
beyond repair.
The first of three explosions came
at 7:35 a.m., spreading panic.
Living amid powder and ammuni-
tion plants the town's inhabitants
knew what the deep subterranean
rumble portended. Many of them,
fearful for relatives working in the
factory, dashed into streets already
littered with broken glass and roof
tiles.
Roofs, Stairways Collapse
A second explosion 15 minutes later
was followed by a terrific blast at
8:03 which destroyed the munitions
plant. Residence roofs crashed, in-
juring householders indoors. Outside
stairways collapsed and doors splin-
terei from their hinge. 'All clocks
in Segni were stopped.
The windows were blow from a
roadside chapel two-thirds of a mile
away.
The explosions ceased after the
third one, but flaies spread under-
ground where tons of wool used in
making high explosives were stored.
Authorities feared further blasts
and kept all but rescue workers a
mile from the smoking debris. {
Duce Stays In Safe Zone
Police held back wives and moth-
ers searching for missing relatives.
One hysterical girl broke through,
but was led back by guards.
Premier Mussolini, whohad been
attending the wedding of his niece in
Rome, arrived to survey the wreckage,
but accepted the advice of guards not
to go beyond a point of safety.
All roads into Segni were closed to
ordinary traffic to make way for fire-
fighting apparatus, ambulances,
truckloads of troops, physicians, and
trucks carrying medical supplies.
The Bomberino Periodi Delfino fac-
tory had been built within the last six
years to speed Italy's vast armament
program. The powder plant, situated
in a.valley almost surrounded by hills,
was built almost entirely under-,
ground.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING S
\ Jan. 29 to I

World Economic Cooperation
Termed Impossible By Remer

Belgian Statesman's Plan
For Parley Not Likelyl
To Bear Fruit, He Finds
By ROBERT MITCHELL
An international economic confer-
ence such as that proposed by former
Premier Paul Van Zeeland of Bel-
gium probably could not be success-
ful in any important sense in the
present political situation of the
world, Prof. Charles F. Remer of the
economics department stated yester-
day.
Wars in China and Spain, suspicion
b'etween certain nations, and special
political alliances which are being
set up, all raise barriers to the pos-
sibilities of a successful international
economic agreement, Professor Rem-
er said. World economic cooperation
would require a degree of unity of ac-
tion by all countries which might be
incompatible with certain national
philosophies of complete self-suffi-
ciency, and with politico-economic
differences such as exist between So-
viet Russia and the capitalistic and
totalitarian economic organizations,
he pointed out.
"Besides the actual barriers set up
by political differences," Professor,
Remer said, 'there is some question,
as to how far extensive economic ar-
rangements can be made without cor-
responding political arrangements, as;
the two problems are closely allied,
and must move together. Without at-,
temptsrat a world Poitical conference
and cooperation, there probably can-
not be a successful world economic
cooperation.
"Trade agreements, such as are

recommended by Van Zeeland, are in-
fluenced largely by political factorsj
such as friendly relations between
countries, and the existence of non-
competing economic and political
aims. Nations which are seeking self-
sufficiency or that are trying to ob-
tain monopolistic control of certain
products can not effectively take part
in a movement of world economic co-
operation."
Even though there is not much
prospect of a permanent world bene-
fit from an international conference
at the present time, such a meeting
might serve to relieve certain tem-
porary questions, in the opinion of
Professor Remer. It could be of im-
portant benefit in turning the atten-
tion of the world to economic, rather
than political, problems, and the re-
sults of a freer world trade might
help relieve certain of the pressures
making for political troubles, he be-
lieves.
Since the World War there have
been two such international economic
conferences, Professor Remer pointed
out, neither of which accomplished
anything permanent. In 1927 a group
of experts in international economics
met at Geneva and were able to for-
mulate a program of international co-
operation, but they did not represent
their government and little was done
about their proposals.
A group of official delegates were
sent to a second conference at Lon-
don in 1933, but these men were un-
able to agree, partly because of un-
certainty about American monetary
and trade policies of that year. Since
that time, however, Professor Remer
stated, the stabilization of the cur-
(age_3)

Kipke Relires1
From Career
'As Grid Coach
Accepts Salesman Position
With Detroit Rubber And
Hardware Retail Concern
Had Received Offer
From Many Schools
DETROIT, Jan. 29.-(P)-Harry G.
Kipke, former football mentor at the
University of Michigan, today an-
nounced his retirement from the
coaching profession.
Kipke, who was notified that his
reign as Michigan coach was to be
ended after nine years, revealed that
he had accepted a position as a sales-
man with the C. J. Edwards Co., De-
troit concern that represents man-
ufacturers of watches, tools, hard-
ward and rubber goods.
"It would have been nice to con-
tinue in football," Kipke said. "The
game has a strange fascination and
it is hard to break away, but I had
the future to think of and I finally
decided that I had better get started
in business before it is too late."
"In permanently retiring from foot-
ball, I can say that I have had my
full share of thrills and heartaches,
victories and defeats, joys and sor-
rows, as player and as a coach. I've
been up and I've been down. I hit the
peak and touched the bottom and I
will always look upon football as the
best game in the world."
After being notified of his dismis-
sal at Michigan as a result of a series
of disastrous seasons, Kipke said that
he wanted to remain in the coaching
profession.
He disclosed today that he had
several offers, one of them from a
leading institution in the south. A
factor in making the decision to enter
business, Kipke said, was his desire
to remain here.
Meanwhile, the identity of Kipke's
successor at Michigan remained a
matter of conjecture. The shroud of
silence continued to prevail among
the members of the Board in Control
of Physical Education who will select
the new coach.
StudentsWarned
Against Stimulant
A warning against the use of the
drug known as benzedrine sulphate
as a stimulant was reissued yesterday
by Dean A. C. Furstenberg of the
medical school.
"The student is ill-advised who
takes this preparation with a view to
avoiding sleep and obtaining un-
natural stimulation of the mind, be-
cause its action may be harmful to
one who anticipates mental effort,"
the dean's statement said in part.
"The sleeplessness produced by this
drug sends the student to his exam-
ination in a state of exhaustion, and
the effects upon the nervous system
. . . are capable of producing serious
disability," Dean Furstenberg warned.

Turns Salesman

'D d' Hildner
Due To Retire
Next Semester

Prof. J. A. C. Hildner of the Ger-
man department, long known to stu-
4:;:;; dents as "Dad" Hildner, will retire
from the University next semester , it
}';was announced yesterday.
S After receiving his A.B. from the
University in 1890 he taught high
school at Hancock, Mich., returning
two years later to get his M.A. degree
and to teach here. In 1899 he re-
ceived his Ph.D. from the University
.. ... of Leipzig Germany
Professor Hildner said his ambition
.. : : .after his retirement is either to get a.
.:job in which he can sit with his feet
:: * on the desk or do research work,
HARRY G. KIPKE probably in the "Sturm und Drang"
period of, German literature, the late
18th and early 19th centuries.
Green R Professor Hildner was known for
Gi eeil epies his unoighodox pedagogical methods,
,1 which included frequent periods of
To Ac usations; class singing of German songs. Apart
1' fromclass he often met with students
e interested in modern German litera-
F ays I C e tre, discussed and read works with
CI them. One such group .took the name
"Indipohdi" from the Hauptmann
Answers Ouster Charges play of that name.
At Convention tThe first course ever to be given in
~aole A onet o f the United States on the German
United Mine Workers philosopher Nietzsche was begun by
Professor Hildner in the early twen-
MIAMI, Fla., Jan. 29.-(A1)-Wil- ties. A course in Hebbel was also in-
. augurated by him.
can Federation of Labor, replied i Co-named in the Kothe-Hildnerl
liam Green, President of the Ameri- German Prize last fall, a donation of
detail tonight to charges on which he a former student of his, he will be well
faces ouster from the United Mine remembered even though no longer
Workers Union, and at the same time teaching on campus.
A banquet will be given in his
accused John L. Lewis of deceiving honor Feb. 23 in the Union ballroom
the UMW "to hide the failure of- his by former students, present students

i

Frank Attacks
Administration
As Fascistic
Republicans Must Uphold,
American Spirit Against
'Hitlerizing,' He Asserts,
TOPEKA, Kans., Jan. 29.--UP)-
Dr. Glenn Frank told the nation's Re-
publicans tonight their party "must
be more faithfully expressive of the
American spirit than the fascist pro-
gram of the New Deal," which, he
said, "threatens to Hitlerize what was
once Democratic self-government."
Dr. Frank, chairman of a national[
Republican program committee of
more than 150 called to meet in Chi-
cago Feb. 28, made a broadcast ad-
dress at the Kansas Day banquet
celebrating the 77th anniversary of
the state's admission to the Union.
With Alf M. Landon, 1936 Republ-
can presidential nominee, and Chair-
man John D. M. Hamilton sitting
nearby, Dr. Frank enunciated a five-
point creed he described as expressive
of the mood in which the party should
approach its responsibilities.
At an earlier luncheon, Landon
said of Dr. Frank that "we are proud
to have as our guest a man who was
a victim .of another man who talks
free speech and then denies it to the,
people of Wisconsin." ,
CHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
Feb. 9, 1938'

Chinese Gain
New Positions
Along Railway
Advance On Lunghai R.R.,
Capture One Town And
Cut Off Another In Drive
SHANGHAI, Jan. 30.-(Sunday)-
OP)--Chinese forces today were re-
ported to have gained new footholds
on the Lunghai railway front in Lower
Shantung Province by driving Jap-
anese from the town of Mengyin and'
surrounding another force at Tsining.
"The Japanese retreated to the
northwest, leaving 200 dead within
the Mengyin walls," a Chinese source
announced.
Chinese ringing Japanese-held
Tsining were said to have beaten off
reinforcements that tried to relieve
the isolated forces.
Japanese spokesmen were silent re-
garding reports on the turning tide
of warfare in these two sectors ex-
cept to admit "the Chinese are slowly
advancing toward Tsining."
Mengyin is about 110 miles almost
due north of Suchow, nerve center of
the Chinese resistance along the
Lunghai railway Tsining is about 100
miles to Suchow's northwest.
On the southern half of the Lung-
hai front, in northeastern Anhwei
Province, Japanese attempted to
storm Chinese positions across the
Mingkwan River but, Chinese sources
asserted they were cut down by ma-
chine-gun fire with heavy casualties.
Since the fall of Nanking Dec. 12
Japanese troops have been pressing
from both north and south toward the
Lunghai line.
On the other principal front Chi-
nese forces reported they had cut
Japanese communications between
Hangchow and Nanking by capture
of a position on the west shore of
Lake Tai, almost due west of Shang-
hai.

leadership."
Green said he was unable to appear,
in person before the miners' conven-
tion in Washington, as he had hoped
to do, to face demands that he forfeit
his card for sponsoring dual union-
ism. So he said he was mailing his 3,-
000-word reply to Thomas Kennedy,
secretary-treasurer of the UMW, with
the request it be read from the floor.
The AFL chief charged Lewis vetoed
the formula for peace between the
AFL and Lewi's Committee for In-
dustrial Organization agreed upon
last month. Green claimed also that
Lewis misrepresented the number of
members in the CIO with "his empty
challenge to have these 4,000,000
members ride into the AFL if only
they were taken in without challenge."
He concluded with the inquiry to
the members:
"Were not these actions on his part
simply a smoke screen to hide from
you the failure of his leadership, to
ward off the day of reckoning for his
reckless squandering of your money?"
Literary Magazine
Tryouts Are Called
All persons interested in writing for
and working on a literary magazine
which will be organized soon were
asked last night by a member of the
committee of four "representatives of
University literary interests" to con-
tact any one of them. .

and colleagues.
Periodic Health
Exam Advised
Indifference Costly Warns
Dr. Kleinschmidt
Persons who take periodic healtht
examinations live longer and betterJ
than they ordinarily would, Dr. Earl
E. Kleinschmidt, of the Division of1
Hygiene and Public Health, said inf
a University broadcast yesterday. N
Society is paying an enormous
price, Dr. Kleinschmidt said, for itsc
indifference to the problem of preven-r
tive medicine. The economic losses to
this country due to preventable ill-1
ness, he said, exceed three billionc
dollars a year.l
The custom in the past, Dr. Klein-c
schmidt said, has been for persons to
ascertain the condition of their healthk
only when sickness threatened. "To-r
day," he said, "more and more peoplec
are seeking the services of their physi-
cian while still in good health for theC
purpose of appraising the conditionr
of their bodies so that they may nott
only live better but more intelligent-
ly.
Memorial Day Riott
Film Here Tuesday
The newsreel of the Memorial Dayr
massacre of steel strikers in Chicago l
last year will be shown at 8 p.m. Tues-
day in Unity Hall, Rev. H. P. Marleyk
announced yesterday. A special pre-
view will be shown at 8 p.m. today for
those unable to attend Tuesday.
On the program Tuesday, known asc
the Unity Hall Town Meeting, Prof.
William Haber of the economis de-
partment, Nicholas Schreiber of Ann
Arbor High School and Cy Boorom
of the Ann Arbor trade union coun-
cil will speak. The meeting will
launch a "League for Peace and De-
morcRe.Mresad

Student Senate
Releases Forms
For Petitions;
Lists Its Rules
Candidates Are Allowed
To Run As Independents
Or For Organizations
Election Scheduled
To Be Held March 11
The Student Senate yesterday re-
leased the proper forms for nominat-
ing petitions for candidates and rules
for their election, Friday, March 11.
The elected group will hold its first
meeting March 15.
Organized by students of the Uni-
versity, the Senate plans to consoli-
date and express student opinion
through a P.R. elected body of 32 stu-
dent Senators running as indepen-
dents or with the backing of campus
organizations or political groups. The
League, the Union and the Studnt
Religious Association will sponsor
the Senate.
The rules of election follow:
1. Nominations - Any scholas-
tically eligible student may have his
or her name placed upon the official
ballot as a candidate for Student
Senator by filing a nominating pet-
tion and paying a 25 cent filing fee.
These petitions must be signed by not
less than five students and are to be
handed in to the Board of Elections
at the Student Senate Office in Lane
Hall between four and six p.m., Mon-
day, Feb. 28 through Friday, March
4. No student may sign more than
one such petition. Candidates may
have a designation of not to exceed
three words printed after their names
on the official ballot if they so de-
sire.
"2. Voting-Any student of the
University is eligible to vote in this
election of Student Senators, and may
do so upon presentation of his or her
identification card at one of the poll-
ing places. Voting will be under the
Hare system of choice voting, some-
times known as single transferable
vote, the voter marking the figure
'1' in front of the name of his first
choice for Student Senator, and so on,
marking as many choices as he wishes.
"3. Election-The election will be
Friday, March 11, the polls being
open from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. The
location of polling booths will be later
designated by the Board of Elections.
"4. Counting-The counting of the
ballots will begin at 8 p.m..-the eve-
ning of the election, in a place to be
designated by the Board of Elections,
and will continue until the 32 Stu-
dent Senators have all been elected.
The rules of the count will be based
upon those in use in the election of
members of the British Parliament
from University constituencies . . . Ab-
breviated copies of the counting rules
to be used in this election will be
available at the Student Senate of-
fice at the beginning of the second
semester.
"5. Senate Meeting-The elected
members of the Student Senate will
hold their first meeting Tuesday,
March 11 in a place to be designated
by the Sponsoring Committee."
The form suggested for candidates'
petitions follows:
We, the undersigned, being stu-
dents at the University of Michigan,
(continued on Page 3)
With this issue the Daily will
cease publication until the be-
ginning of the next semester, Tues-

day, Feb. 15.

Note: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time of
Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the first
quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such
work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned exam-
ination periods should be reported for adjustment to Professor J. C.
Brier, Room 3223 East Engineering Building, before January 26. To
avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should receive
notification from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period January 29 to February 9.
No single courses may be permitted more than four hours of ex-
amination. No date of examination may be changed without the
consent of the Classification Committee.
Time of Exercise Time of Examination

The "four" are Edward Magdol, 39,
Charles Peake, Morris Greenhut and
Progressives To Swing Giovanni Giovaninni. The latter three
At 'Mid-Year Mix-up' are graduate students. Magdol's pe-
tition to the Board in Control of Pub-
Progressive students will listen to lications Jan. 14 prompted action to-
,i bwards the formation of a campus lit-
Toscanini's broadcast, swing out to eayp'idcf*
Goodman's and other recordings and erary periodical:
generally forget exams at the "Mid- The English Journal Club appoint-
year Mix-up" at 8:30 p.m. Saturday, ed Mr. Peake, Mr. Giovaninni and Mr.
Feb. 12, at Lane Hall. Greenhut to investigate the need
Arrangements have been made for for a literary publication. They, to-
members of the Progressive Club to gether with Magdol, met three mem-
hear the Toscanini concert during the hers of the Board in Control of Stu-
early part of the evening in the down- dent publications Friday to hear ten-
stairs lounge. There will also be group tative plans for a new campus lit-
games at the party, rary magazine.

Reading, Writing Are Now

Taught

Final Examination Schedule, First Semester, 1937-38: College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts, Graduate School, School of Education,
School of Forestry.

Time of Examination

To Inmates Of The Jackson Prison
o-

4

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday,
Friday,
Wednesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Tuesday, t
Wednesday,
Friday,
Thursday,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
,Jan.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.

7
4
2
31
8
31
8
7
1
2
1
9
4
3

8-12
8-12
8-12
8-12
2- 6
2- 6
8-12

By MALCOLM B. LONG
Teaching about 250 illiterates to
read and write, and educating 1,800
inmates of Jackson State Prison to
an eighth grade level are the pur-
poses of the prison school being con-
ducted there with the assistance of
Prof. L. W. Keeler and Dr. Clifford
Woody of the School of Education.
The Mental ability of most prison-
ers is sub-normal and the amount of
schooling is very low, statistics show.
However, the prisoners wish to know
how to read and write, first because
they wish to communicate with
friends and relatives and do not want
to carry nn their mrsbnnondne

illiterates, composed mainly of Mex-
icans and other aliens and some
Negroes from other states, which
asks to be taught to read and write.
Four years ago the prison school
administrators asked the assistance
of the school of education of the Uni-
versity in preparing more satisfactory
materials for study. The prisoners,
being adults, objected strenuously to
using regular primers with their cat
and dog stories which were obviously
intended for the use of small chil-
dren.
nnon f the imnnotcunro a man urh

done by another of the inmates. Even
the teaching from these books is done
by convicts under the direction of
G. I. Francis, who is hired by the
State.
The men expressed great satisfac-
tion with the books, and the fact that
they were entirely the work of fellow
convicts increased their interest.
The alarming number of illiterates
is explained by Dr. Keeler, who said
that at the time of the World War
draft many of the soldiers who had
gone only through the third or fourth
grades had entirely forgotten how to
read or write through lack of onoor-

Exam. Time
Group of
Letter Exercise
A Mon. at 8
B Mon. at 9
C Mon. at 10
D Mon. at 11
E Mon. atl1
F Mon. at 2
G Mon. at 3
H Tues. at :8
I Tues. at 9
J Tues. at 10
K Tues. at 11
L Tues. at 1
M Tues. at 2
N . Tues. at 3
0 Special
P Special
Q Special
R Suecial

First Semester

Second Semester

Mon.,
Fri.,
Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Fri.,
Thurs.,
Sat.,
Sat.,
Sat.,
Thurs.,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.

7,
4,
2,
31,
8,
31,
8,
7,
1,
2,
1,
9,
4,
3,
5,
5,
29,
3.

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9,12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Sat.,
Thurs.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Thurs.,
Fri.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Sat.,
Wed.,
Sat.,
Tues.,
Sat.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

8,
6,
7,
6,
13,
4,
9,
13,
7,
9,
10,
14,
10,
11,
8,
11,
14,
4.

9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
ruesday at

2- 6
2- 6
2- 6
8-12
8-12
2- 6
8-12

I

I

,.

I I

r

r

Feb.

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