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January 29, 1938 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1938-01-29

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PAGE FOUR

THI . MICHIGAN DAILY

SA2'UnDA,7e, JAN 29, 1938

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JAN, 29, 1838

-~ - I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Edited and managed by students of the University of
Michigan under the authority of the Board in Control of
Studer+ Publications.
Pubiuhed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session.
Member of the Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the
use for republication of all news dispatches, credited to
It or not otherwise credited in this newspaper. All
rights of republication of all other matter herein also
reserved.
En'red at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan as
second class mail matter.
Subscriptions during regular school year by carrier,
$4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Member, Associated Collegiate Press, 1937-38
REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY
NationalAdvertisingService, Inc.
College Publishers Representative
420 MADISON AVE. NEW YORK. N. Y.
CICAGO BOSTON - LOS ANGELES - SAN FRANCISCO
Board of Editors
VANAGING EDITOR ...............JOSEPH S. MATTES
CDITOR AL DIRECTOR ..........TUURE TENANDER
CIT~Y EDITOR................. WILLIAM C. SPALLER
NEWS.EDITOR-....................ROBERT P WEEKS
WOMEN'S EDITOR-..................HELEN DOUGLAS
SPORTS EDITOR -......................IRVIN LISAGOR
Business Department
BUSINESS MANAGER .............ERNEST A. JONES
CREDIT'MANAGER.................DON WILSHER
ADVERTISING MANAGER .... NORMAN B. STEINBERG
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .......BETTY DAVY
WOMEN'S SERVICE MANAGER ..MARGARET FERRIES
NIGHT EDITOR: S. R. KLEIMAN
The editorials published in The Michigan
Daily are written by members of the Daily
staff and represent the views of the writers
only.
Spare The Drugs
And Save The Student
T IS COMMON KNOWLEDGE that
dpingrace horses is contrary to law.
Yet, there seem to be some students on campus
who have found it necessary to dope themseves
in an attempt to pass examinations.
These students lay off their studying until the
last week before examinatons and then find that
they have more work to cover than they possibly
could in the time remaining. They then take
various drugs, without the advice of a physician,
in an effort to go through long stretches without-
sleep.
This is regrettable for two reasons. One: it con-
sistently has been shown that it is practically
impossible for an entire course to be assimilated
in eght or ten hours and have that course mean
anything to the student. Second: these people
often come to regret the fact that they have
foolishly meddled with their health when they
begin to suffer from insomnia and nervous break-
downs.
Earl R. Gilman.

UNDER 9)
THE CLOCK
with DISRAELI
THE BOYS in the Back Room got themselves
comfortable in their chairs and the cigar
smoke, amnong other things, got thicker and
thicker.
"Boys," said Pinkie the Mink lined Muscle Man,
"boys, we got a problem. Today's the day the Boys
get together and resolve themselves in the Com-
mittee for the Dissemination of Student Opin-
ion." We gotta decide what the Associated Letter
Writers of Hoi Polloi should use as the subject
for their letters-to-the-Editor this week."
"War!" shouted Winnie the Gin Sop.
"Peace! screamed Bennie the Belch.
"No! The lynching bill! The old Southern
Gentleman said, his eyes flashing and the image
of courtesy.
"The educational system ... phooey !" said the
Man with the Red BVD's.
"Naw, cut out that stuff! What do you think
a letter to the editor is, a pulpit for the propa-
ganda of crackpots?" Pinkie the Mink Lined
Muscle Man smiled to himself at his well turned
phrase. He certainly had a way with him.
"Yeah," said Johnny Greenbehindtheears.
"Where do you get that stuff?" He nodded his
head under the approving eye of Philbert Phoo
and Pinkie.
"You must forget sectionalism, intellectualism.
dualism, rheumatism and neuralgia," Pinkie con-
tinued. "Let this be an expression that repre-
sents the most pertinent, most pressing, most
captivating, most entrancing of all the sentiment
of the entire campus. In a word-or two-what
is it that fills the minds of that great body
politic, that superb collection of young and
eager intellectuals, the students of this great
university."
"Barrelhouse," said the Old Southern Gentle-
man thumping his cane with utmost politeness
and rising to make a: speech. "Sah, in the South
it is ah custom and ah pride that we have the
politest lynchings in the country but today ah
am proud and ah am chahmed to relinquish
mah devotion to the preservation of intolerance
and barbarity in favah of barrelhouse, in favah
of thah killlah-dillah ."
"Hurrah!" shouted the Boys in the Back Room.
"Hurrah!" And he sat down jingling his medals
of the Confederacy politely in a gentle jam session
and dramatically throwing his pocketsized noose
into a corner.
"Okay," said Pinkie at last when the roar of
the crowd had subsided. "Then this week we
are going to ask Johnny Greenbehindtheears be-
cause he is someone everybody knows and admires
because of his fascinating ability to do nothing at
all with the utmost of energy, to direct that all
letters-to-the-editor are confined to a discussion
of J-Hops bands and the barrelhouse: Johnny, get
the public behind it! It's up to you to produce!"
"Yeah!" said Johnny and Philbert Phoo nodded!

ifeen to Ale
Heywood Broun
Dorothy Parker has made, it seems to me, an
important contribution to the ever current dis-
cussion of humor, its uses and abuses. She did
an an article on Spain for New Masses recently,
and in her introduction she wrote:
"The only group I have ever been affiliated with
is that not particularly brave little band that
hid its nakedness of heart
and mind under the out-of-
date garment of a sense of
humor. I heard someone sayt
and so I said it, too, that
ridicule is the most effective
Sweapon. I don't suppose I
ever really believed it, but it
was easy, and so I said it.
Well, now I know. I know
that there are things that
never have been funny, and never will be. And
I know that ridicule may be a shield, but it is
not a weapon.
A Piece Of Expert Testimony
No single witness is sufficient to swing a
verdict, but this should be acceted as expert
testimony, since Dorothy Parker has long been
hailed as one of the first wits of our day. She
coined many mots. and others, by no means as
good as her own. were attributed to her. Indeed,
narrators often tried to win the favor of an au-
dience in advance by using the introduction,
"Have you heard Dottie Parker's latest?"
She became a myth, and to some extent in the
paragraph which I have quoted she does obeisance
to the Dorothy Parker legend. Ridicule was
hardly her only weapon. There was plenty of
heartbreak in her so-called light verse.
Still it probably is true that the prevailing rule
in her group used to be, "When in doubt make a
wisecrack." Doubts are always disturbing dinner
guests, and it is easier to snub them than to
resolve them.
I admire people who can make epigrams ,and I
love people who can make puns. These are not
easy arts. A good punster is like a good sprinter.
He covers a lot of ground in a few strides, though
to be sure, he is running for his life.
But something strange and sudden has hap-#
pened to the boys and girls who were once
people of infinite jest. It seems there has been
a mass conversion on the road to Damascus, or
maybe it was Madrid. Causes, and good ones
at that, have caught up with those who used toj
tell the funny stories. Most of them still remem-
ber some kick they learned before they were
saved, and so they can be earnest without being
priggish.
And where are the academicians, the men and
women who looked down on the cafe litterateurs
as frivolous? I'll tell you. They are either down
in the deep dugouts or dancing around in the
public square with cap and bells, and being aw-
fully, awfully comic.
Fresh Forces Come Upt
Possibly there is a universal application in the
story of that famous incident which happened on
the road to Damascus. Quite probably it profited
Paul that he had once been Saul, and 'way over
on the other side of the tracks. There is no
fury like that of a convert. And there is no such
efficiency elsewhere.
Those who come at the eleventh hour have
more steam in their punches for rounds twelveI
to fifteen, inclusive. I do not know more than a
handful of old liberals who haven't become tiredj
in recent years.
It is probably an excellent idea for every man
to pick his corner when he arrives at discretion,
but it is also a good notion to save something
for the final rounds. And at that stage of a fight
I think the regulation just has to be "Quit your
kidding,"?

On The Level
By WRAG
Aunt Bella" of the Lawyer's Club continues
the battle with Michigan co-eds by making a
plaint against perpetual female saddle shoe wear-
ing. He believes that "the impulse of self-
protection" makes them wear such awful foot-
gear. For proof he quotes Anatole France, "A
woman attracts a civilized man in proportion to
the angle her feet make with the ground . .."
Jabberwok attended last night's concert
and came back with the following song: "Bob j
White-Whatcha Gina Cigna Night?"
n the near future, cigarette manufacturers
will offer a newly patented idea to smokers.
This innovation will make cigarettes give off red,
blue. green, yellow and other colors of smoke.
Designed primarily for women, these vari-colored
smokes can match the girl's dress, fingernails,
and if the smoke is red. it can match her date's
bankroll.
A sophomore economics bull-session was
somewhat taken aback yesterday when one
of the cramming students asked, "Where is
this place called 'Utopia'? I can't find it on 3
this map anywhere."
Scene; Final meeting of the Equity and Law

MUSIC DAILY OFFICI
Il[till }Auditorium Publication in the Buletin is cons
University. Copy received at the offi
Ginga Cigna, French dramatic so-until3:30; 1:00 a.m. on Saturday.
prano of the Metropolitan Opera
Company, appeared last night in the,------- 2
eighth of the current Choral Union all other registrations) and to make
concerts. The program consisted of arrangements for lesson periods, stu-
songs and arias in French and Italian; dio practice, etc., at the office of the
Gluck, Cerdi. Puccini, Rachmanin- President of the School of Music as
off, Gretchaninoff, and Respighi were far in advance of the opening of the
among those represented. i second semester as possible, to avoid
confusion and last minute em-
In reviewing a performance such barrassment.
as that of Mlle. Cignafone must either __
sacrifice the innate humane desire to Naval Architecture and Marine En-
be pleasant or else perjure one's ai- gineering: Students expecting to
tistic conscience. Therefore it is our classify for the second semester should
unpleasant duty to record that. consult the classification list in Room
judged by sound and sincere musical 326 West Engineering Building for
standards, the performance last night! the time of their classification.
left much to be desired. Undoubtedly em he ss tn
Mlle. Cigna is possessed of a pleasant The Roger Williams Guild open
personality, and moreover she prob- houses will be discontinued until the
ably passed on to most of her mildly beginning of next semester.
entertained bearers the emotive states
through which she passed. Sections 15 and 16 of Sociology 51,4
Vocally, the singer's performance meeting at 9 -a.m. and 11 am. Sat-
was no more than adequate. Realiz- urday, will meet today,
ing that Mlle. Cigna is one of the lead- Elmer Akers.
ing prima donnas in the Italian wing
of the Metropolitan, one can easily Independents: All those who have
see more than one reason why Wag- signed-up for Congress J-Hop booths
ner is now enjoying such a vogue may find out which booth they are2
at that institution. In its middle reg- in by consulting the lists on the Con-
ister, when not forced, her voice was gress bulletin board in the lobby of
moving and flexibly guided by the the Union.-
musical line. The lower register had A breakfast will be served for all

AL BULLETIN
tructive not ice to all inembrs or the
Ce of the Assistant to the President
Hanna, 208 U.H.
Hart, 201 U.H.
Hathaway, 302 M.H.
Helm, 1025 A.H.
Knode, 229 A.H.
Knott, 1025 A.H.
Leedy, W. Phys.
Ogden, 1025 A.H.
Peterson 2215 A.H.
O'Neill, 103 R.L.
Peake, 205 S.W.
Schenk, 4003 A.
Stibbs. 2235 A.H.
Stocking, 301 U.H.
Taylor, W. Phys.
Walcutt, W. Phys.
Weimer, 103 R.L.
White, 2215 A.H.
Wells, 2235 A.H.
Williams, 1025 A.H
Woodbridge, 103 R.L.
English II.
Roellinger, 2054 N.S.
Stevens, 18 A.H.
Nelson, 4208 A.H.
Room Assignment for Final Exam-
inations in German 1, 2, 31, 32. Jan.
29, 1938, 2-5 p.m.
German I.
N.S.A.. Diamond, Graf, Gaiss,
Schachtsiek, Striedieck.
1025 A.H., Willey, Philippson, Su-

less to give, and the upper was sel-
dom under complete control. Intona- Final I
tion, especially in releases, was fre- ture, Sci
quently at fault. Forestry.

-

Examination Schedule, First Semester, 1937-38: College of Litera-
ence, and the Arts, Graduate School, School of Education, School of

For the most part, Mlle. Cigna's
interpretations were faithfully con-
ceived, although conveyed more by
external histrionics than by subtle;
musicianship. Outside of the songs
by the two Russians and the de-
lightful one of Respighi's, it was the
Verdi arias, from The Force of Des-.
tiny and Aida, which were most pleas-!
ing and gave more legitimate sway{
to the over-dramatic tendencies of
the artist. Fritz Kitzinger gave cap-j
able accompaniments.
aFORUM

Time of Examination

Exam.
Group
Letter

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R

Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Mon.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Specia
Specia
Specia
Specia

Time
of
Exercise
at 8
at 9
at 10
at 11
at 1
at 2
at 3
at 8
at 9
at 10
at 11
at 1
at 2
at 3
.l
l
l

First Semester

Mon.,
Fri.,
Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Fri.,
Thurs.,
Sat.,
Sat.,
Sat.,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Feb.
Jan.4
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan. 2

7,
4,
2,
31,
8,
31,
8,
7,
1,
2,
1,
9,
4,
3,
5,
5,
29,
3,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9,12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5

Wed.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Sat.,
Thurs.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Thurs.,
Fri.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Sat.,
Wed.,
Sat.,
Tues.,
Sat.,

Second Semester

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

.8,
6,
7,
6,
13,
4,
9,
13,
7,
9,
10,
14,
10,
11,
8,
11,
14,
,4,

9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

Dorms Vs. Fraternities

* "*"*j

To the Editor:
I will attempt to keep away from
the words Foo and Poo and Foo, inas-
much as they are abhorrant to so'
many, and so as not to incurr Profes-
sor Slosson's wrath any more than
possible. The controversy between the
two systems which these terms rep-:
resent seems to be of sufficient im-
portance for discussion, however.
"Peace, civil liberty and economic.
.justice" do not always take a na-
ooueogjWuis l uoieu.tajui .o 1euot
but may be of importance even in a
1 restricted area.;
It is not the intention of the writer

Thurs., Feb.

Any deviation from the above schedule may be made only by mutual agree-
ment between students and instructor and with the approval of the Examina-
tion Schedule Committee.
N.B. Within the past year, the time of exercise for several of the courses
listed in the Literary Announcement has been changed, but due to an over-
sight no corresponding change was made in the Examination Group Letter.
In order to avoid conflicts in such cases, the time of exercise-rather than the

approvingly.
"Hurrah!" shouted the Boys in the
Room, and history having been made,
trucked on down to the baffleboard in the
room and sat sipping cokes.

Examination Group Letter-must be{
examination.
those interested in a private dining
room of the Union at 3:30 a.m. The
price will be 75 cents (75c) per per-
son. All those who wish to make a
reservation may do so by signing

Back
they
front

A Lesson
In Journalism. .**

P AUL Y. ANDERSON, one of Amer-
ica's greatest reporters, has been dis-
charged by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, for which
he has worked for twenty-three years. Whether
his dismissaj was unjustified is not our concern.
But that his reporting has been far ahead of
any other Washington correspondent's deserves
comment.
le has never been content to write such un-
adulterated slop that leaves the reader in a per-
petual haze as to what was actually hb.ppening
in Washington. He wrote vigorousy and straight-
forwardly, using few "if's" and "but's." He was
responsible for the airing of tle Teapot Dome
scandal, and he, more than any other, helped
to bring the disgraceful Memorial Day massacre
in Chicago to the public.
It is almost always said that bias in the news
columns is wrong. Maybe it is, but one wonders
when one reads such stories as Anderson wrote
on the Memorial Day massacre. In such cases
as this, when a good -reporter's judgment tells
him one side is definitely wrong, it might be well
that the reader know.
A young man entering journalism could do
little better than to model himself after Anderson.
S. R. Kleiman.
As Others See It
- ul
Congreos expects soon to receive from the Pres-
ident a message recommending increased expen-
ditures for national defense. Although the bud-
get already allots nearly a billion dollars to this
purpose, and although this sum is nearly twice
as large as the amount spent for the army and
navy as recently as 1934, it is nevertheless true
that the defensive needs of the country must be
judged in the light of the conditions actually pre-
vailing in a troubled world. The United States

ON CAPPY
THE GREAT BOLONEY of over-publicized
intercollegiate athletics there is always some-
where a justification for the direct application of
big business methods. This is usually the claim
of character building. Sometimes it is good old
Anglo-Saxon "playing the game" that is the
main stuff. Sometimes it is the men that the
athletes have an opportunity of contacting. At
Michigan this is the greatest claim and for once
it is justified. Michigan athletes in their after
years can on the whole lay claim to having
reached a higher level of living and a more sub-
stantial place in the business and social world
than the average ex-athlete who has played his
;ame under coaching regimes where the play is
upon higher pressure production methods where
you have to produce or else. Maybe the team
wins more gaines-and sometimes it doesn't-
when there is the element of a distant, all-power-
ful and impersonal force directing the efforts.
What it does leave with the players though is
just about what is left to some denim shirted
fellow who loves his boss and is an intense be-
liever in -the capitalistic system, but who works
for eight hours a day on some final assembly"
line.
The point to all this is that among the men
we admire most for his ability to come close
to the Michigan athlete and regard him not only
as material for the championship tender in his
sport, but as a lusty, healthy kid who loves action
and a good time, is Franklin C. Cappon. His un-
prepossessing attitude arou id the Field House,
belied sometimes by his loud shouts and the
swell swear words he can slam off sometimes, has
many times hurt him but it has also earned him
the respect of many publicity conscious persons.
Cappy besides handling a heavy share of the ad-
ministration duties for the Athletic department
has gathered for himself a keen regard of his
players.
It doesn't exactly amount to hero worship, but
the men on the basketball team and men on the
football team have found in him the basis of that
deep friendship possible only between men. It
not based upon ability to coach nor upon ability
as an executive, nor upon any tangible knowledge
of anything. It is just that most men have an
ability at making and pleasing acquaintances.
others at acquiring useful friends. And then,
most men are able to make at least a few genuine
friendships that last through their lives.

to claim any sort of perfection for the their names on the list on the Con-
fraternity system. Is any system per- gress bulletin board before Feb. 8.
fect? The Interfraternity Council
could be a much stronger group than, Aca
lit is. However, whether this weak- demic Notces
ness is"due wholly, to a lack of co- Economics 51: Rooms for final ex
'operation among the fraternities am., Thursday morning, Feb. 3:
themselves, or in part to the organi- 25 A.H., Travis.
zation, members,or officials of the 35 A.H., Polk.
council, is another problem.- 1035 A.H., Aldrich.
There can be no doubt that fra- 231 A.H., Dufton.
ternities have a definitely useful place 205 M.H., Anderson.
on the Michigan campus. They are l 103 R.L., Colberg.
old established groups, and represent
much of the Michigan tradition. At Relativity, Mathematics 178, second;
present the Greek letter societies rep- semester: Persons interested in this
lastic average is above the all men's course who have conflicts, please
group on campus. At a school of this communicate with Professor Rainich.
size no one can doubt the value of
j organization in the shadow of so Mathematics 36, Section 1 (Lit. Col-
much disintegration. The purpose of lege, Dr. Myers): This section will
this letter is not to advocate any rah- { have its final exam in Room 202 Ma-
rah stuff, but on the other hand, this son Hall, Friday, Feb. 4, 9-12 a.m.
would certainly be a dull place with-
out fraternities. The fraternity sco nglish 35 (Section 3): Final ex-
I lastic average is baove the all men's Enlh35(eto3)Fiacx
i average. Although no claims to high amination for Mr. Rettger's section
fraternity scholarship is made hereinwill be held on Monday, Jan. 31, 2-5
the facts speak for themselves. In p.m., in the regular classroom.
proportion to the ratio between af-
filiated and non-affiliated men, the English I and II Final Examination
number of fraternity men in activi- Schedule, Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2 p.m.
ties is much the larger figure. Fra- English I.
ternit men hold a majority of the Ackerman 2003 A.H.
important campus positions. It must Allen. 215 A.H.
be admitted that perhaps some fra- Baum, 225 A.H.
ternities place too much empasis on Bertram, 2014 A.H.
activities, however, as the Univer- Calver, 4043 A.H.
sity supports both scholastic and ex- Cassidy, 215 A.H.
tra-curricular activities, the frater- Cowden, 3227 A.H.
nity standing in each should be given Dean, 4203 A.H.
important consideration. Ellinger, 203 U.H.
Under the present scheme (mainly Everett, 3231 A.H.
concerning the Allen-Rumsey House), Foro, 2203 A.H.
will the dormitory system remedy any Giovannini, 103 R.L.
of the so-called evils of the fraternity Green, 1209 A.H.
system- The answer is an emphatic Greenhut, 35 A.H.
-No! The 'dormitories can scarcely Haines, W. Phys.
bring a more intellectual atmosphere

employed in determining the time of
dermann, Braun, Van Duren.
1035 A.H., Scholl.
German 2.
C. Haven Hall. All sections.
German 31.
25 A.H., Gaiss, Diamond, Graf,
Van Duren.
231 A.H., Willey, Reichart, Philipp-
son.
1035 A.H., Scholl.
301 U.H., Wahr.
201 U.H., Hildner.
German 32.
203 U.H., Nordmeyer.
306 U.H., Eaton.
EE. 7a, Building Illumination, will
have its examination on Saturday af-
ternoon, Jan. 29, at 2 p.m., in Room
338 and 340, West Engineering Build-
ing, directly above the regular lec-
ture room. Those few students who
have another examination at this
time should see me as' soon as pos-
sible for adjustment.
Mathematics 6, Section I (9 o'clock):
This section will have its final ex-
amination Saturday, Jan. 29, 9-12
a.m., in Room 318 West Engineering
Building.
Political Science 1 and 2. Final ex-
amination Thursday, Feb. 3, 2-5 p.m.
The following rooms have been as-
signed:
Hayden's section, 25 Angell Hall
Kitchin's sections, 35 Angell Hall
Dorr's sections, 25 Angell Hall
Cuncannon's sections, 205 Mason
Hall
French's sections, 231 Angell Hall
Kallenbach's sections, C Haven
Hall
Kline's sections, 1025 Angell Hall
E - -

1
7
i
jE
I
l
t

Concert Postponed: The concert by
the School of Music Little Symphony
Orchestra announced for Sunday
evening at the Michigan League, has
been postponed to March 6.

to university life.

As proved by women's dormitories,.
studying would not be any easier aa
process in dormitories than in fra-
ternities. Cliches will exist in a dor-
mitory as much and possibly more
(as it is claimed they do), within or
between the Greek letter social or-1
ganizations. The most important'
question, however, is that of finances.
Under the present set up, the living
expenses at the Allen-Rumsey House]
1 are Ps hiohs o i thns nn v rarm

Ivy Colleges, but to improve men's EventsToda y
rooming conditions. Those men able University Broadcast. 5:45-6:00 p.m.
to spend four or five dollars per week Public Health Series. Topic: "Periodic
for rooms would hardly be victima- Health Examinations," Dr. Earl E.
tized by poor rooming conditions. It Kleinschmidt, Instructor in Hygiene
is primarily those who can afford and Public Health.
only about two or three dollars for
rooms that poor rooming conditions
would affect, therefore. At the pres-
ent time, living expenses at the Allen- Junior Research Club: The Feb-
Rumsey House are not solving the ruary meeting will be held on Tues-
nhlem of unfit living nurtr. ri ar a h - nminPnnm1 . , . i

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