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January 21, 1938 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-01-21

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.SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRiDAY, JAN. 21, 1938

Hill Auditorium
Lioht Mystery
Solved At Last
False Skylight Holds Clue
To Puzzle Of How Bulbs
i -Dome Are Changed!
By WILLIAM L. MacINTOSH
For years Hill Auditorium has held
the secret of one of the major myster-
ies on campus. Many is the fresh-
man taking an orientation exam or
upperclassmen bored with a lecture
who has looked up at that great oval
of lights which encircles the audi-
torium's dome and wondered, "How
do they change them?" Well here's
the answer.
That skylight you see from your
seat is a false one, and between it
and the real skylight is an enormous
room the curving floor of which is
the other side of the dome. This
false skylight is circled by a small
catwalk around which runs a con-
duit, or pipe-enclosed line, which has!
a socket above each point in the dome!
where there is a light. A short ex-
tension line plugs into each socket
and the other end of this line plugs
into the light through a small hole in
the dome just large enough for the
line to go through to the bulb. The
light is held secure by a small iron
bar. When a light burns out, the
bar is removed and a long rope is tied
to the extension line which is un-
plugged from the conduit and lowered
over 70 feet to the main floor where
the light is changed and sent back
up the same route to be refastened
in the dome. And that's the story
you can tell that little freshman who
sits next to you at the Choral Union
Concerts-unless you think you can
get away with telling her the jan-
itors are all ex-acrobats and the
whole thing's done with ladders and a
breeches buoy.
Aside from the secret of the lights,
probably one of the most fascinating
things in the Auditorium is the organ.
Contrary to common belief, it is not
the original Frieze memorial organ
of the 1893 World's Fair, but, ac-
cording to Prof. Palmer Christian,
University organist, has with the ex-
ception of five sets of pipes, been en-
tirely rebuilt and was dedicated in
May, 1928. The space given to the
organ loft, 18 feet wide, 50 feet long
and 40 feet high, is exceptionally fine
said Professor Christian.
The loft, standing behind those
false pipes you see from the auditor-
ium, is a veritable forest of nearly 8,-
000 pipes. They range in size from
the largest, 25 inches square and 32
feet high, to the smallest-about the
size of g lead pencil! Different pipes
are made from different materials:
wood, zinc, lead, tin, brass and anti-
mony. They give four types of tone,
one dignified and impersonal, and
the other three orchestral, similar to
flute, string and reed.
But one of the interesting things
about the organ is its action, which
is electro-pneumatic. When a chord
is played on the console, an electric
contact is made.
Ii -1

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
Jan. 29 to Feb. 9, 1938
Note: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time of
Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the first
q:.tiz reriorl.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such
work during one week.
Certain courses will Le examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned exam-
ination periods should be reported for adjustment to Professor J. C.
Brier, Room 3223 East Engineering Building, before January 26. To
avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should receive
notification from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period January 29 to February 9.
No single courses may be permitted more than four hours of ex-
amination. No date of examination may be changed without the
consent of the Classification Committee.
Time of Exercise Time of Examination

Black Horse Troopers Take Trail In Northern New York

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday

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ruesday at

Monday,
Friday,
Wednesday
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday
Tuesday,
Wednesday
Friday,
Thursday,
*Saturday,
*Saturday,
*Thursday,
*Saturday,
*Thursday,
*Friday,

Feb.
Feb.
, Feb.
Jan.3
Feb.
Jan.3
Feb.
Feb.
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, Feb.
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Feb.
Jan.2
Feb.
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7
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4
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29
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7 8-12
4 8-12
2 8-12
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2- 6
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$ 8-12
2- 6
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E.M. 1,2; C.E. 2; German;
Spanish
Surv. 1, 2, 4; French
M.E. 3; Draw. 1, 2
E.E. 2a; Met. Proc. 2, 3, 4
Economics
Drawing 3

Warming up to a cold scent, "Lobo" and "Lady" lead George Rosbrook and C. F. Anderson (right) along a
snowy trail near Malone, N.Y. The men and bloodhounds are attached to the "Black Horse Troopers," a*
part of New York state police, who patrol their beat on snowshoes and horseback. Just ten miles from the
international boundary and Quebec, the Black Horse Troopers preserve the peace in a manner akin to the
tradition of the Canadian "Mounties."

*This may be used as an irregular period provided there is no
conflict with the regular printed schedule above.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication In the Bulletin to constructive notice to alinmerabera a t e
wersity. 00y reCeived at the iss o f AOw a-t t othe PvrsrrMM
nwRd sMZ@: 11 au. e Saturday
- MR-aa=

(Continued Irom Page 4)I
by Professor Alexander Mastro-Va-k
lerio of the College of Architecture,
in the South Gallery, Alumni Mem-
orial Hall; and Etchings, Lithographs!
and Woodcuts by the Chicago Artists]
Group in the North Gallery, Alumni
Memorial Hall; daily 2 to 5 p.m. in-
cluding Sundays, Jan. 12 through 26,
under the auspices of the Ann Arbor
Art Association.
SLectures
University Lecture: Dr. Hu Shih,
Dean of the Chinese National Univer-
sity, Peiping, will lecture on "De-
mocracy versus Fascism in China,"
on Wednesday, Jan. 26, at 4:15 p.m.
in the Natural Science Auditorium
under the auspices of the Depart-
ment of Political Science. The public
is cordially invited.

announced. Dr. Bernard Heller will
speak on "The Present Situation in
Roumania." Phi Sigma Sigma Soror-
ity will have charge of the social fol-
lowing the services. Services will be-
gin at 8:00 p.m.
Badminton Test, Women Students:
Any woman student wishing to take
the badminton test for physical edu-
cation requirement should report at
Barbour Gymnasium between 4:15
and 5:45 p.m. Friday, Jan. 21.
A medical check for 1937-38 is es-
sential.
Coming Events
German Table for Faculty Members:
The regular luncheon meeting will be
held Monday at 12:10 p.m., in the
Founders' Room of the Michigan
Union. All faculty members interest-
ed in speaking German are cordially
invited.

Prof. Mastro-Valerio
To Give Art Talk
A discussion, centering about the
current print exhibition in Alumni
Memorial Hall, will be conducted by
Prof. Alexander Mastro-Valerio of the
architecture college, one of the con-
tributors, at 3:30 p.m. Sunday in the
Hall, it was announced yesterday.
Open daily until Wednesday, Jan.
26, the exhibition features, besides
Professor Mastro-Valerio's etchings
and tints, a group of proletarian lith-
ographs, etchings and woodcuts byI
the Chicago Artists' Group and is
sponsored by the Ann Arbor Art As-
sociation.
In the forum, "Prints, Print-Mak-
ing and Print-Collecting," Professor
Mastro-Valerio will answer questions
on his work and will be assisted by
several other print specialists. The
public is invited.
TAX RECEIPTS ANNOUNCED
Washtenaw County's portion of
the state's gasoline and weight tax
receipts during 1937 totaled $420,-
458.88, it was announced yesterday.
Of this sum, $294,403.24 was ear-
marked for maintenance of county
and township roads.

Wagner Describes
S panish Folk-Tune
Prof. Charles P. Wagner of the ro-
mance languages department de-
scribed the "Cante Flamenco," a type
of Spanish folk music in the first of
"La Sociedad Hispanica's" series of
six lectures.
Augmenting his speech with phono-
graph recordings, Professor Wagner
told of the origin of the song in Ara-
bic and gypsy sources and explained
that the music is similar to that sung
in synagogues.
In the next lecture, Feb. 24, Dr.1
Charles N. Staubach of the romance
languages department will speak on
"Spanish Science and Invention."
Subsequent talks will be given by
Prof. Arthur S. Aiton of the history l
department, Prof. Julio del Toro;
Prof. Herbert A. Kenyon and Joseph
IN. Lincoln, all of the romance lan-
guages department.
STUDENT RECITAL
Thomas W. Williams, tenor, will
present a program in partial fulfill-
ment of the requirements for the
Master of Music degree, at 8:15 p.m.
Monday in the School of Music Audi-
torium. The general public is in-
vited.

I --.--- - ------------------ ------------------------ --------------~ .11

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EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

CKLW
P.M.
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6:30--Exciting Moments.
6:45-Raymond Gram Orch.
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8:15-Charioteers.
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WXYZ
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6:00--Day in Review.
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WWJ
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6:00-Ty Tyson.
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7:15-Radio Extra,
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8:00-Lucille Manners.
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9:30-Trae Story Hour.
10:00--First Nighter.
10:30-Jimmy Fidler.
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11:00-Newscast.
11:15-Dance Music.
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WJR
P M.
6:00-Stevenson News.
6:15-Melody and Rhythm.
6:45-To Be Announced.
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7:30-Victor Arden Music.
7:45-Boake Carter.
8:00-Hammerstein Music Hall.
9:30-Paul Whiteman Orch.
9:00-Hollywood Hotel.
10 :00--Songshop.
10:45-Musical.

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