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January 14, 1938 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-01-14

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRiD- Y, i 1, I.KR

TWO FRIDAY, JAN. 14. J~$

Fear Bitterness
On Lynch Bill
Will Stop FDRi
Sen. Norris Says Feelings
May Endanger -Enacting1
Of Legislative Program'
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.-(P) --
Sen. George Norris (Ind., Neb.) ex-
pressed concern today lest bitterness,
produced by the Anti-Lynching Bill
fight dim chances of enacting Presi-
dent Roosevelt's legislative program.
The veteran Nebraska Indepen-
dent said both sides in the fight "feel
very deeply" about the issue, and
that a continuance of the debate may
open wounds difficult to heal.
He said "psycholdgical differences"
which may result from the battle
would have a more serious effect on
Mr. Roosevelt's program than the
loss of the time consumed in the fili-
buster itself.,
On the Senate floor, Arkansas'
woman Senator, Mrs. Hattie Caraway,
carried the fight against the proposal,
which would provide for Federal
prosecution and fining of sheriffs who
fail to protect prisoners, and would
make counties liable for payments to
the families of lynching victims.
Mrs. Caraway won a rest for her
Southern colleagues by sending to
reading clerks a lengthy report made
by a minority of the Judiciary sub-
committee in 1887. The report, she
said, bolstered her argument that the
anti-lynching measure is unconstitu-
tional.

Three Ace Reporters On Way Home From Last Assignment 'Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen' Caught
Its Original Owner Sound Asleep
. means that you're grand .. ." becoming one of the country's most
Thus goes the current musical rage, popular songs and already has been
Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen," which is incorporated in a forthcoming mov-

t

Sigma Phi Epsilon Hunts
Their Long Lost 'Son'
Police. students and the public at
large are asked to cooperate in the
recovery of a bundle of warm, brown
fur resembling a chowr' puppy, lost,
strayed or stolen yesterday from the
Sigma Phi Epsilon House, 1805 Wash-
tenaw.
Members of the fraternity are leav-
ing no stone on the campus unturned
to find their newiy-acquired mascot

4

This was the scene in Paris as caskets bearing the bodies of three newspapermen killed when a shell struck
their car near Teruel, Spain, were removed from the train. Left to right are the caskets of Edward Sheep-
shanks of Reuters (British) agency, Bradish Johnson of Newsweek, and Edward J. Neil of the Associated Press.
Sheepshanks and Neil also served in the Ethiopian war.

ieing whistled, hummed and sung inj
every corner of the campus. The song,
oi iginally a score in a Yiddish musical
presentation, has an interesting his-
tory.
It was composed by a young Jewish
musician who had written a great
deal of music for the Yiddish Art The-
atre. It was written as a part of a
larger score, the composer having no
idea of its potentialities as a popular
song.
One day last summer, at a country
resort, two Negro entertainers heard
the song and were captivated by the
catchy melody. They asked what the
words meant; wrote them down and
memorized the melody.
Later in the summer the Negroes
were singing in a fashionable night
spot and gave a rendition of the song.
An executive of a motion picture com-
pany was present and was impressed
by the tune. He secured the name of
the author from the Negroes and sent
two mento contact him and purchase
the rights.
The men told the young musician
they just wanted to make a few hun-
dred copies to see if they could be
sold. The author, thinking himself
very fortunate, sold all the rights to
the song for a pittance.
It is needless to note here the me-
teorical climb of "Bei Mir" and the
money made on it by the owners of
the copyright. "Bei. Mir" is rapidly
10:00-First Nighter.
10:30-Jimmy Fidler.
10:45-DorothysThompson.
11 :0-Newscast.
11:15-Dance Music.
11:30-Dance Music.
12:00--Webster Hall Orch
WJR
P M.
6:00-Stevenson Sports.
6:15-Melody and Rhythm.
6:45-To Be Announced.
7 :00-Poetic Melodies.
7:30-Victor Arden Music.
7:45-Boake Carter.
8:00-Hammerstein MusichHall.
9:30--Paul Whiteman Orch.
9:00-Hollywood Hotel.
10:00-Songshop.
I 10:45-Musical.
11:00-Headline News.
11:15-Week in Review.
11:45 -Meditation.
12:30-Ted Flo Rito Orch.

r

r

----

SNOW

l(' R AI N

Notice!
LAST DAY Reservations

ing picture.
The composer recently was given a
contract at the usual "liberal" Holly-
wood level and is now writing movie
music in the same general style.

can

be made for the SNOW TRAIN
as Railroad Equipment must
be ordered!I

Teaching Of Elementary GradesI
And English Top Opportunities
Appointments Bureau Has mand are later elementary, commer-
.pin cial, physical education, Latin, math-
Increase In Applcants ematics, social sciences, home econ-
For Instruction Positions omics and music, he said.
Mr. Purdom also reported that 1,-
Students planning to teach after 700 calls for teachers were received'
graduation will have the best chance last year, an increase of 9.1 per centt

Solution Looms
B C T

In Rift
A d AFLT

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
CIKLW
P.M.
6:00-Turf Reporter.
6:15-News and Sports.
6:30-Exciting Moments.
6 :45---Ray Keating Orch.
7 :00----Northwestern High.
7:30-United Press BulleiAns.
7:45--Henry Weber Orch.
8:00-Mary Jane Walsh.
8:15-Charioteers.
8:30-Happy Hal's Housewarmino
9:00-Black Horse Taxvern.
9:30--Juvenile All-Stars.
10:00-Dance Rhythms.
10 :30-Musicale Moderne.
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter.
11:15--Musicale.
r 11:30-Art Kassel Orch.
12:00-Guy Lombardo Orch.
12:30-Vincent Lopez Orch.
wxyz
P.M.
6:00-Day in Review.
6:15-Factfinder.
S 6:30-Girl Friends.
6:45-Lowell Thomas.
7:00--Mary Small.

+ - d

Lais tones

RICARDO CORTEZ
~CITY GIRL"

Today
JESSIE MATTHEWS
"GANGWAY"

I'

and

P~tW ZI 1V I1CiEir v Iover the previous year. Calls for
I for securing a position if they spe- p i y
NEW YORK, Jan. 13.-( )-Labor cialize in early elementary and Eng- candidates originated in 47 different
leaders on a half dozen fronts looked lish teachg according to the Bu- states and eight foreign countries-
tonight for solution of the AFL-CIOlc In placement of students and grad-
rift as David Dubinsky's verbal skirm- reau of Appointments and Occupa- uates, personality is usually the de-a
ish with John L. Lewis on the issue tional Information. ciding factor, he said. Although the
simmered to an apparent end: T. Luther Purdom, director of the' scholastic requirements must be met
Dubinsky himself, president of the Bureausannounced that the number before the applicant will be consid-
International Ladies' Garment Work- of registrants on the active list of ered, scholarship alone will not se-
ers Union (CIO), indicated a belief the teaching division in 1937 was 30 cure a position. The appearance and
that, having brought the question of per cent more than in 1936. There personality of the individual is, in
Lewis' alleged scuttling of the CIO- are now 2,919 registrants on the list. most cases, given more weight, Mr.'
AFL peace negotiations into the open, Following the early elementary and C Purdom said.

,N(

THE RHYTHM OF SQ
Starting Saturday

WING

W ,aJ1JJMI

...w.w

it was up to others to carry through. English specialists, those most in de-
gClassified Directory)
Onee bokfoLaClbPhn

LAUNDRY1
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. I
WANTED
TYPING, neatly and accurately done.
Mrs. Howard, 613 Hill St. Phone
5244. 3x
VIOLA STEIN, 706 Oakland. Phone
6327. Experienced typist. Reason-
able rates. 232
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
old and new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru-
ments. Ready cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304. 2x
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM for woman graduate
student. Reasonable distance from
law school. Phone 7948 Thursday
or Friday afternoon between 1 and
6. 264
SINGLE ROOM for man. Second se-
mester. 112 E. Davis. 270
FOR SECOND SEMESTER, large
front room for two. Hot water,
showers. Near South University.
1331 Washtenaw. Call 7595. 267
FOR THREE MEN, suite with pri-
vate bath and shower. Also large
double, with adjoining lavatory-
Shower bath. Steam heat. Phone
8544. 422 E. Washington. 268
SINGLE ROOM, nicely furnished, for
girl or business woman. Call 8767;
1033 E. University. 263
ROOMS with meals. Private bath
with two room suite for faculty
member and wife orgraduate stu-
dents. Excellent meals. Attractive
home. Phone 8891. 265
TWO ROOMS for second semester.

SOne block from Law Club. Phone
5400 after 6 p.m. 261
FOR SALE
HIGH GRADE Fischer Piano; Banjo-
uke; Tux~edo, 2-piece. Size 38. Call
9783, after 4 p.m. 256
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Two month old brown chow
pup. Thursday morning on Campus.
Call Sigma Phi Epsilon. Reward.
269
LOST: Diamond ring set in yellow
gold at Drake's Sandwich Shop atI
11 Thursday morning. Call Shirley
Hicks. Jordan Hall Reward.
266
LOST: Gold Elgin man's wrist watch
between Hill and Oakland or on
campus Wednesday afternoon. Re-
ward. Call 2-1888. 271
LOST: Last week, brown, silk "Sul-
tan" scarf somewhere on campus.
Call Gal Keene 2-3371. 258
LOST: Black leather zipper note-
book. On Campus, near the library.
Reward. Benn Hornbeck. Phone
9408. 262
LOST: Wallet of Harold Mason Gould
with cash, meal ticket, identifica-
tion card. Reward. Call 2-1767.
257
NOTICES
SECOND SEMESTER evening school
begins Monday, January 17 at Ann
Arbor High School. Commercial,
Language, Hobby and general
courses offered. Registration fee.
For further information call 5797.
260
LADIES tailoring and dress-making;
formals, suits, coa relining, all al-
terations. Expert service, reasonable
rates, work guaranteed. 320 E. Lib-
erty. Call evenings 2-2020. 7x

"A large part of the work of the 7:30-LoneRa er.
8:00-Grand Central Station.
Bureau is concerned with alumni in 8:30-Death Valley Days.
the field," he said. "A definite effort 9:00-.To Be Announced.
9:30-Tommy Dorsey Orch.
is made to keep in touch with the 10:00-To Be Announced.
University of Michigan graduates in 10:30-Light Opera Company.
educational work. Of the 2,919 can- 11:15-Dance Music.
didates on the active list, 2,747 are 11:30---Henry Busse Orch.
12:00--Graystone.
alumni registered for positions and 12:30--Fletcher Henderson Orch.
promotions. WwJ
"The office has up-to-date cumu- P.M.
lative records of these alumni, who 0~~ Tyson.
are engaged in many phases of work 6:30-BradMast.
in this field. This makes available 6:45-Musical Moments.
a selection of successful, experienced 7:15Ra di o Extrady.
candidates to recommend for the bet- 7:45--sports Review.
ter positions and for specialized fields, 9:00-Waltz Time.
which enables the Bureau to render 9:30--Trae story Hour.
more adequate service in meeting the -_
needs of the employers." MATH PROFESSOR HONORED
Placements for the years 1937 in- Professor W. L. Ayres of the mathe-
creased by 18.6 per cent, 547 teachers inatics department was named Asso-
being placed as follows: colleges, 106; ciate Secretary of the American
high schools, 237; elementary schools, Mathematical Society at their annual
100; administrative positions, 47; pri- meeting in Indianapolis recently. Pro-
irate schools. 10, and other teaching fessor T. I. Hildebrant was elected to
positions, 47. the Board of Editors of the American
Mr. Purdom emphasized that the Journal of Mathematics and Profes-
services of the Bureau are open to all sor R. L. Wilder was asked to be one
graduates and students of the Univer- of nine speakers at the semi-cen-
sity. tennial celebration

EAT GOOD CLEAN
FOOD
PLATE LUNCHES
l5~ 20c
WAYNE
COFFEE SHOP
201 East Uberty

C

wommolommommomm - - . i

I

It's zurgY
with the brightest stars of
.wing lane to entertain
you as never before?
WALIR WAtGER *Pres*
wit acas ~ 2 starS headed b
Ith a catE * LEO CARRILLO
AN PAUTER * ELLA LOGAN :
SiP LE R S . ZA S PT S
PAAS S ENNY BAKER

I

Extra

IRENE
"DU BARRYI

BORDONI
DID ALL RIGHT"

NEWS OF
THE DAY

MARSHALL Cut-Rate Drug
231 SOUTH STATE - Phone 9242 -- 8 Doors North of Kresge's
-- PRICES EFFECTIVE TODAY -
6 American Made 50 Halibut Liver Oil
TOOTH BRUSHES Capsules
49c49
Your choice of Style. Highest Vitamin Content
TAMPAX - 33c 4 Dz. KOTEX - 75c KLEENEX - 13c
Look for the Sign MARSHALL'S CUT-RATE Above the Entrance

I

YOUR COLLEGE LIFE
in
COMPLETE REVIEW
THE 1938

MATINEES 25c --EVENINGS 35c
NOW! TODAY and SATURDAY

It's GRAND FUN!

Continuous 1:30 - 11:30 P.M.,
20c to 5 P.M. --- 25c after 5
3 ,DAYS - STARTING TODAY-



Action, thrills, suspense,
and love (when there's
time for it) ... that's

NOtG'
IR
ViA

I

CI

r

in

A murder a day keeps marriage away,
says Pat. But poor disappointed Joan...
always a bloodhound, never a bride!

m

CLATIN

2

THE OFFICIAL YEARBOOK
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

E

;;: .1

'

i is ' l e O ,111 im I

U

m hE 4~ 11 11 1

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