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January 13, 1938 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, JAN. 13, 1938

THE MIC 1. C141G AN IN)DA 11, Y

a - - .-- -

Japan Weighs Its Moral Status!
Before Formally Declaring War

His Serial-Novel Medical Co-op
Gave To Rolland Plans Debat
A Literary Niche 150 Families To Pay 4
For Doctor's Service
Romain Rolland, idealizer of the

Past Examinations Building, Dave Cushing, '40E, class jackets or rings. The jackets would
president, announced yesterday. be similar to a sport coat with patch
On File In Library The meeting has been called to de- pockets and would have the class in-
___cide whether the class will purchase signia over the breast pocket.

By ROBERT MITCHELL
Whether or not Japan, as a result
of its Imperial Conference decides
formally to declare war on China, de-
pends on whether it thinks the mili-
tary advantages in International Law
of such an act will outweigh the moral
obligations involved, Prof. Lawrence
Preuss of the political science depart-
rnent declared yesterday.
Japan has not declared war, be-
cause it is bound by the Kellogg-
Briand pact to renounce war, Profes-
sor Preuss explained, and to keep
within the letter, if not the spirit, of
its pact, it is engaging only in an
"armed reprisal" against centers of
Chinese antagonism.
Japan Now Hampered
"But because Japan is not engaged
in a war," Professor Preuss declared,
"she is hampered in some of her mil-
itary campaign." At present, the only
blockade she can put around China
is one against Chinese shipping alone,,
whereas under a state of war she
could claim the right to blockade all
commerce of any nation coming into
China.
"Japan also, under present condi-
tions, may be forced to take respon-
sibility for much proven destruction
of foreign property in China and6 for
incidents such as the Panay attack.
As regards the Panay, under a state
of war Japan might possibly have
claimed that the boat was in a war
zone, or no-man's land, and that what
happened to it was nobody's responsi-
bility."
There are also other possible ad-
vantages of declaring war, Professor
Preuss stated, but as the questions of
disadvantage or advantage of declar-
ing war have merely arisen before,
they are not dogmatic. If war were
declared and Japan were victorious it
would probably have a better legal
case at closing the Open Door of
China by insisting that the old trea-
ties were invalidated with the fall of
the old status of China.
China Seeks To Be Mlartyr
China has not declared war, he
added, because of the present legal re-
strictions on a Japanese blockade, and
because it wants to appear before the
world in its position of defensive or
martyred nation.
Japan's reluctance to declare war

or to admit that actual war exists
in the Far East is illustrative of a
new philosophy among aggressor na-
tinn that hn ru cin flh

i
i

$201
es

uIons Lna i nas grown up sincet e
World War, Professor Preuss stated. individual man and human values,
Before the war, he explained, there has made an important place for him-
was no united world opinion against self in the field of French literature
war as exists today and no treaties I'a..C
,sthe first French serial-nnvl writ~t r

by which states were restricted from
goine to war as they pleased.
Immediately following the war,
however, a strong world anti-war feel-
ing caused the formation of the
League of Nations and the drawing
up of the Kellogg-Briand pact, by
which nations agreed to renounce
war. Nations which had only to re-
spect feeling against offensive wars
before, now had to keep in letter, at
least, their obligations to renounce
war, and they have achieved this by
denying that it exists in a legal sense,
or resorting merely to "armed repri-
sals."
Others May Recognize War Status
These legal denials of war by ag-
gressor nations do not necessarily
keep, other nations from recognizing
that a state of war exists, Professor
Preuss declared, but whether other
nations choose to take this action or
not depends on their own economic
and political interests.
In the present situation, the Pres-
ident has not found a state of war in
China, mainly because it is feared an
embargo would hurt China far more
than Japan and would also injure our
Pacific foreign commerce.
If Japan declares war, Professorj
Preuss stated, the legal effect on the
Kellogg pact which it has signed'
would be merely to expose it to the
legal right of other nations to declare
war on it. This, however, in view of
the collapse of the League of Nations
peace machinery and the pacifist at-
titudes of most nations of the world,
probably would not stand as a very
important consideration by that gov-
ernment.
I.A.S. MEETS TODAY
The University branch of the In-
stitute of, Aeronautical Sciences will
meet at 7:30 p.m. today in Room 1042,
East Engineering Building. Lieut. H.
R. Nieman of the U.S. Naval Air Corps
will speak on some of his experiences
with that body.

azI t.t.3 111 U rA tMUflJSn e. awi- l lu v W ,
Prof. Anthony Jobin of the romance
languages department said yesterday
in the third lecture of the French
Club series.
Rolland rebelled against the arti-
ficiality and super-refinement of con-
temporary literary leaders, Professor
Jobin declared, and fought for eman
cipation of fhe individual man, both
in political life and in the literary
themes of the day. In the World War
he fled from France because of his
abhorrence of war.
He had, Professor Jobin said, a
great and generous spirit, sympathetic
and understanding. He fought against
the restrictions on individual con-
science placed by mercantilism, ideas
of patriotism, and social traditions
and was interested primarily in char-
acter and purpose.

Plans for a medical cooperative to
be composed of about 150 families of
faculty members and townspeople
were discussed by a committee head-
ed by Charles W. Spooner of the en-
gineering college at a meeting Mon-
day night.
Each family will pay a yearly fee
of approximately $20 to engage the
services of a physician for the group.
After the society is established, some
form of hospitalization will be con-
sidered.
Townspeople will be particularly
urged to join this organization, and
the 500 members of the Ann Arbor
Cooperative Society will be canvassed.
Cooperative medicine is of value in
treating disease in its early stages,
Dr. J. B. Warbasse, president of the
Cooperative League of the U.S.A., said
Dec. 13.

It's
"Telephone Home Time"
when the clock
strikes 7

ow

no

Every evening at 7 o'clock, long distance telephone rates for
calls to most points are reduced. The same reduced rates
apply also all day Sunday! Take advantage of these lowest
rates to call the folks at home, or friends at distant points.
Rates for calls to representative points are shown below.
For rates to any other place, ask "Long Distance" (Dial 110).
3-MINUTE STATION-TO-STATION RATES

ANN ARBOR to:

Day
except
Sunday

ALBION

ALPENA.
BATTLE CREEK
BAY CITY .
BENTON HARBOR
BIG RAPIDS.
FLINT
GRANb RAPIDS
HI LLSDALE
HOLLAND
HOUGHTON.
KALAMAZOO
LANSING
MARQUETTE
MT. CLEMENS
MUSKEGON.

$ .50
$1.05
:60
.70
.90
.85
:45
.80
.45
.85
1 55
.70
.45
1.40
.45
.90
1.10

Night
and
Sunday
$ .35
$ .60
.35
.35
.50
.45
.35
.40
.35
.45
.95
.35
.35
.85
.35
.50
.65
.35
.35
.80
.60

Prce per Pound
Minimum Bundle'-
Shirts, Extra . .
(Full Dress Shirts Not Included in

PETOSKEY

Suits of Underwear
Shirts
Handkerchiefs
Pairs of Socks
Bath Towels
Pair of Pajamas

PORT HURON

SAGINAW..
SAULT STE. MARIE
TRAVERSE CITY

.60
.60
1.25
1.05

. . _ , _ _.

. . _ _

K - ' 9 6. 0 a r WvU

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