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December 03, 1937 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE 1MICHI A N DAILY

FRIDAY, DEC. 3, 1937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DEC. 3, 1937

Tops In Flats This Season
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Michigan Men
Wearing Better
Grade Of Shoes
No Hot Number As Season
Records Bigger Variety
Than Ever In Footgear
With each passing season it becomes
more evident that, a prospective "fa-
shion plate" pedals to the heights of
sartorial elegance, with his lower ex-
tremities (i.e. feet). And the dressing
up of feet, of course, brings us to the
subject of shoes.
In general, although the prices this
year are approximately the same as
last, there has been a decided better-
ment in the quality of the merchan-
dise. There also is a general tendency,
to avoid the so-called "bargains." Men
are coming to learn that a "good shoe"
is a good investment. The average
college man, however, still does not
know one leather from another (with
the possible exception of buck). Pop-
ular approval, the salesman's word,
and the general appearance of the
shoe are still the determining factors
in the final selection.
Wide Style Range{
.This season has seen awider range
of styles than ever before. There is
no one "hot number," without which
the college man just doesn't count.
Individuality in taste has much room
for expression in shoes, providing, of
course, that taste remains within the
bounds of the occasion.
The trend in shoes this season is
away from the conventional "dressy
shoe" in favor of the rugged, "sporty"
type. The English motif is quite
apparent with their brogues enjoying
a great measure of popularity. The
full, broad toe has replaced the nar-
row spade edge, and brass eyelets are
once more coming to the fore. Heavy
perforations are also gaining popular
approval.
Norwegian Barge Popular
The most popular shoe on campus
this season has been the Norwegian
Barge model. A heavy, dark moc-
casin effect in oil tanned leather,
copied from the northern ski-boot,
this shoe has proved the ideal outdoor,
all-rouhd model.
Carried over from the last few sea-
sons and still riding high in popularity
is the dark,wine-colored cordovan. In
either wing-tip or plain toe, this shoe
has proven one of the most practical
campus shoes, being equally suited to
either dres or sport wear. The black
sole and heel in this model is espec-
ially effective.
The natural leather, "luggage tan"
shoe, which has gained so much pop-
ularity on the Eastern and Western
Coasts, is conspicuous by its absence
in the Mid-West.
The Scotch grain is still a good
number, although its price has been
a little too steep for the average
wardrobe.

Sweaters

And

Pajamas
Styles Are Different For
Different Locations In
Your Rooming House
At bedtime style defers to expedi-
ency with the Michigan man. The
prudently clothed tenants of Ann Ar-
bor's best rooming houses begin with
the pajamas shown at the lower left.
The broad British stripes or the solid
color with piping are equally accept-
able.
For second floor inhabitants there
need, except in extreme cases, be only
one more layer. Perhaps a knitted
cardigan as shown here. This may
be used in place of a pullover or waist-
coat and comes in both sleeveless and
sleeve models. Our smart check pat-
tern can "double in brass" as it is
also useful for daytime wear with
country suits. Equally popular for
the nocturnal role is the light-weight
Shetland pullover in blue with a
deeper blue border.
For the third-floor man this smart
windbreaker of suede or smooth fin-
ished leather is indispensable. It may
have either a zipper or button front.
Our illustration has a combination of
both and is called the "middle-of-the-
roader."

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TIE-MURRLER DUO
Ties and socks have long been pre-
sented in combination but this it is
mufflers and ties that are being
matched. The two are of real Scotch
wool and in various gay plaids.
FINE GIFTS FOR MEN
from the
GIFT SHOP FOR MEN
A FINE
Miltons Suit
or Overcoat
$1 800 /.$400
MACKINAWS by Shan-
house. All colors. $14.95

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Given a sizeable momentum by Al
Smith in 1928, it has since been
threatened by the decline in political
fortune of its most notable American
exponent, but has held its ground re-
markably well. The model shown
here is one of the latest and most
widely successful chapeaux of its
type.

IIIi I1

Greeks Had It
Style Universal,
History Reveals
Olden Time Dandies Vied
To Outdo Each Other
In SplendorOf Dress
Sardanapalus, of Greek legend, was
a ruler of Nineveh, whose decadent4
reign came to a tragic close. Sur-
rounded by enemies, he collected his
wives and treasurers around him and,
setting fire to his palace, perished in
the vast conflagration.
The historic Assurbini-pal (to give
him his real name) was a great As-
syrian king of the 7th century B.C.
At the time the pomp and circum-
stance of the Pagan eastern world
rwas at the glittering peak of its mag-
nificence. The rulers of Ninevah,
Tyre, Babylonia and Egypt adornedI
their raiment with jewels of great!
value, and seldom went forth without
a vast retinue of handsomely arrayed
retainers.

noticeably in the ensemble effect.

WATCH THOSE DETAILS GLEN PLAID ENSEMBLE
The attention the well-dressed man ackets, muffler and caps are be-
pays to details of attire such as collar ing shown in matched combinations
pins, tie chains and cuff links reflects of Glen plaid this year and are con-

sidered extremely smart for sports

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HE'S SURE TO LIKE

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colors.

$3.00

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NEW STYLE'S FIRST AT WILD'S

HATS - Fur Felts.

All

EY WAYI0 (IE GIFTS

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Many Feasts Held

Let him select the style and shade himself
... all you have to do is tell us, and we'll
send him a handsome miniature luggage-
box with your gift certificate inside. A
perfect answer to the difficult question of
what to give a man.
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Their banquets and feasts were of
untold number and indescribable lux-
ury. Among all these brilliant figures
none was a greater lover of adorn-
ment than Assurbini-pal. He also
had a catholic regard for history and
diligently collected tablets recording
the happenings in his kingdom. To-
day- this library of information which
he assembled is one of our chief
sources of knowledge of those times.
Another dandy to reign many cen-
turies later was Richard II. of Eng-
land, about whom Shakespeare wrote
his magnificent play. Richard has
been described as the greatest fop
who ever occupied an English' throne,
not barring that celebrated beau,
George IV. King Richard was tall
and handsome, but very effeminate
and he quite failed to fulfill the.
provise shown, when ,as a boy, he
faced Wat Tyler and his rebels.
Had $100,000 Coat
The young king spent huge sums
on clothing and one of his coats, em-
broidered with gold and precious
stones, was valued at 20,000 pounds.
At today's value this is roughly $100,-
000, but the sum in those days rep-E
resented an equivalent of five or six!
times that amount.
The sleeves of his coats were so
long and exaggerated that they often
trailed on the ground, and the long
pointed toes of his velvet shoes were
so elongated that they were fastened
to his knees with golden chains.

1
,

DRESS SHIRTS--Plains,
Stripes, Plaids. $1.65
NECKWEAR - Maga-
dors, Silks, Reps, Stripes,
All-over designs, Pin Dots.
55c
* SPATS-Variety of col-
ors. Leather Trimmed. $1.00
* MUFFLERS - A com-
plete selection of Flannels,
Knits, and Dress Silks. 95c
* SWEATERS-All Wool,
Checks, Patterns and Solids.
Pullovers, Zips, Buttons.
$2.95
*. SUSPENDERS & BELTS
-by Pioneer. All new and
large stocks to choose from.
50c to $1.00
* SHIRTS and SHORTS-

AS ADVERTISED INESQ UIRE-

On pages 285, 286, and 287 of December
ESQUIRE there is presented, in full color, a
new way of giving gifts.

The idea is this:

We have had created

for us, gifts that are related from the very out-
set of their manufacture. Ties go with shirts;
handkerchiefs, socks, and so forth all go togeth-
er to make up harmonious ensembles, because
they were planned in advance to do just that!
Examine these pages in ESQUIRE . . . then
come in and see the identical gifts . .. which
you will find here and nowhere else!

Plain and Pattern.

50c

* HOSE-Silks, Lisles and

Wools.

35c to 75c.

i

Tremendous stocks, complete

I

V_. w/ l 11 111

Ii I Treendos socks comteI

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