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November 18, 1937 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-11-18

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THE MICHIG AN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOV. 18, 1937

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Analyze Factors
Behind Business
New Recession
High Labor Costs, Taxes
And Utility Suppression
Are Given As Causes
I Continued from Page 1)
made businessmen uncertain and
fearful may be removed.
Similarly, the taxation question is
bound to come in for consideration
by Congress, and, though revision
may be still considerably in the fu-
ture, the mere fact that the Admin-
istration is relaxing what has been
termed its "punitive" attitude to-
wards business in favor of a more co-
operative approach may do much to
inspire business to expand.
The commercial inflation move-
ruent was the ever spiraling upward
trend of prices of certain commodities
believed to have been out of propor-
Aton to costs of production. Forward
buying was one of the reasons why
prices should have risen so fast.
Producers bought ahead beyond
their immediate needs in anticipation
of future price increases.
Monopoly High Prices
Semi-monopolistic industries such
as steel also raised their prices be-
ond what is believed by many econ-
omists to be the proper justifica-
tion, though the steel companies in-
.sist that their price boosts were made
.* measure only as costs of produc-
tion increased.
The government's hostile attitude
:to the public utilities and to the rail-
roads, two of the three important
bulwarks of capital goods production
has, according to the experts, been
the reason for the failure of these in-
dustries to expand.
This hostility of the government
found expression in the competition
'of the government in its power proj-
ects and its pressing for stringent
legislation governing the public util-
ity field.
Specifically the ublic utilities are
.bot $2,600,000,000. behind in their
expenditures, it is estimated. The
railroads, too, it is charged, have
checked their expenditures both for
capital equipment and improvement
of road-beds, because of low rates
set by the Interstate Commerce Com-
mission.l
Government Peace OfferF
The government has taken note of
these factors, and the President has
*olered peace to the utilities if they
would revise their valuation basis
pon which rates are, in large meas-
ure,. fixed. This signifies a more
friendly attitude to the utilities.
Likewise the problem of railroad
rates is under serious investigation
by the Interstate Commerce Commis-
sion which has already shown more
generous gestures towards the rail-
roads by allowing some rate increases
already.
Striking Indiana Students
Locked Out From School
RISING SUN, Ind., Nov. 17.-UP)-
'A strike of Rising Sun high school
students-punctuated last night by
bullets--became a virtual lockout to-
day and got nowhere with its demand
that Cassius Dugle, discharged jan-
itor, be given back his job.
School authorities refused, admit-
tance to any of the 75 strikers, a
group of whom was fired upon by a
deputy sheriff last night, unless they
brought their fathers or mothers with
.them. Only 15 appeared at school
with parents. The others, refused ad-
nittance, roamed the streets. The
school has an enrollment of 250.
EVENING RADIO

PROGRAMS
WXYZ
P.M.
6:00-Day in Review.
6:15-Factfinder.
6:30-Linger Awhile.
6:45-Lowell Thomas.
'7:00-Easy Aces.
'7:15-Keen Tracer.
7:30-Green Hornet.
8:00-Hugh Johnson.
8:30-March of Time
9:00-American Revue
9:30-America's Town Meeting.
10:00-Picadilly Music Hall.
11.00-Tomorrow's Headlines.
11:30-Bob Crosby Orch.
12:00-Lowry Clark.
12:30-Garwood Van Orch.
CKLW
P.M.
6:00-Turf Reporter.
6:15-News and Sports.
6 :30-Waltz Time.
6:45-Pleasant Valley Frolic.I
7:00-Pacific Hawaiians.I
7:30-United Press Bulletins.

President's Substitute Support Pledged
By Fr ater:nities
To Dormitories
(Continued from Page )
L M sponsible for the starting of the dor-
mitory drive by the Chicago alunmi
In the near future, the committee
will announce a local project to raise'
funds. It also decided to make a
constitution providing for fraternity
representatives on the committee, and
to decide upon a method for appoint-
ment of members.
The committee is now made up of
Bruce Telfer, '38, chairman, Doug-
las Farmer, '38, secretary, Bud Lu-
dahl, '38, Hugh Rader, '38, John
Thom, '38. Joseph Mattes, '38, Tuure
Tenander, '38, Carvel Shaw, '39, and
Robert Fitzhenry, '39.
Fraternities were also warned at
the meeting last night to watch kit-.
(clien management and guard against
unfair business practices and graft
When the President doesn't make thee.
a "personal appearance" to give Action was taken to appoint a
his message to Congress, the duty charity'committee to start the Inter-
is performed by A. E. Chaffe fraternity Charity fund plan working.
(above), senior reading clerk of the The plan crals for all charity ona-
House, who has held that fpost for tions by fraternities to come from the
19 years. It was Chaffee who read Interfraternity Council, each ra -
the Prsdn';mssgiotenw ternity giving a certain amount to a.
hePresident's message to the new- fud
ly convened special session. gener nd. was adopted late las
year, but has not yet been put into
ASK SEAL DRIVE SUPPORT effect.
LANSING, Nov. 7.-(/'Th-Governor1 Exchange dinners between frater-
Murphy urged residents of the state nitieswillbe held every other week.
in an executive proclamation todayl Bud Lundahl, '38, president of the
to support the Michigan Tuberculosis Council, and Prof. Robert P. Briggs
Association's annual Christmas Seal of the economics department were
sale, that the Association's "winning: voted funds to attend the meeting of
fight may continue" against the dis- the National Interfraternity Council
ease. Nov. 26 and 27 in New York.
l'iDr
NOTICES FOR SALE
ALL KINDS of typing done at reason- NEW RETINA kodak, filters, tripod,
etc. by discount--need cash. Call
able rates. Experienced 535 Thomp- 2-1536. Toyka Nagashina. 170
son. (House set back in small court).
FOR RENT
TYPING-Carefully and accurately
done. L. M. Heywood. 803 E. King- ROOMS for men. Shower bath, steam
sley St. Phone 8344. 106 heat. Phone 8544. 422 East Wash-
ington.1 7
HOME-COOKED MEALS for men LOST AND FOUND
students at 420 S. Division. 179 - ----------------.
LOST: Chronex wrist watch near
WANTED Mich. Theatre Sunday night. Re-
ward. Call Randall Price, Lawyer's
WANTED: Single room for Graduate Club, 4145. . 178
student near the campus and in a LOST: A red Sheaffer pen and pencil
small house. Write or phone in- set, inscribed Eleanor Miron. Re-
formation Box 5, Michigan Daily. turn to 411 Mosher. Reward. 181
AGENTS wanted to sell calling cards
and bookplates. Moderately priced.
Liberal commission. Chestnut Press
6019 Chestnut St. Philadelphia, Pa. EO !
164
FACULTY family desires house for" FLOWERS
2nd semester. Reasonable rent. Call for
9803. THE GAME
TYPING, neatly and accurately done.
Mrs. Howard, 613 Hill St. Phone
5244. 3x
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
old and new suits, overcoats, at $3, at the
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru- CHELSEA
mets. Ready cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304. - 2x F LOW E R SHOP
LAUNDRY 203 East Liberty
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8:00-Cherniavsky Orch.
8:30-Happy Hal's Housewarming.
9:00-Jack Denny Orch.
8 :30-Sinifonietta.
10:00-Dance Rhythms.
10:30-Henry Weber Music.
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter.
11:15-Freddy Martin Orch.
11:30--Billy Swanson Orch.
12:00-Benny Goodman Orch.
12:30-Wayne King Orch.
WJR
P.M.
6 :00-Stevenson Sports.
6:15-Comedy Stars.
6:30-Chesterfield Sports.
6:45-Whispering Jack Smith.
7:00-Poetic Melodies.
7:30-Gabriel Heatter.
8:00-Kate Smith.
900--Major Bowes.
10 :00-Buddy Clark.
10:30--Essays in Mlusic.
11:00-Headline News.
11:15-The Mummers.

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IITROJAN LAUNDRY
Phone 9495

VARSITY LAUNDRY
Phone 2-3123
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