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October 17, 1937 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY NDAY, O

)T. 17, 193

.t

Hark All Gentle Ladies Ere Yet Ye Tread The Concert Aisle

RECORDS

It I

By TOM M9CANN I work on the recordings of Victor will!
s an artist Sergei Rfachmaninoff make his genius realized forever.
t the peak of his brilliant career, Evidences of his technical skill can
. as a composer he has similarly be seen in his interpretations of De-
i.nguished himself.' His recordings bussy's "En Bateau" and "The Hun-!
w him as the interpretative, imag- garian Dance Number 17."
tive musician he is, and we have * * *
y to refer you to his recording of The Boston Symphony, always one
original composition, "Hopak," of the best concert attractions, has
oh has been recorded by Victor recently created another evidence
verification of this judgment. of its f'ell-known ability in a Victor.
**recording of the introduction of
Moussorgsky's "Khowantchina." The
ichard Crooks, one of the great- mysterious and lovely music of this
of American tenors, has also left mad genius is done with incompar-
mark in the musical world. His able subtlety and beauty of tone
eal is mainly applicable to the under the direction of one of the mas-
ers of light opera, but in many ters of modern music, Serge Kousse-
ances he verges upon the semi- vitzky.
ular. Witness, for instance, his * *
iarkable recordings of "Yours Is Two other violinists of which the
Heart Alone," "Two Hearts" and world may well be proud are Georges
ly A Rose." Enesco and Yehudi Menuhin. En-
* * * esco wil lappear for the last of the
'ritz Kreisler, the greatest violin- Choral Union concerts, Tuesday
of our time, still maintains his March 1, and this finale will be truly
11 over the American music lovers. fitting with the offerings of this great
is a spell which will last, and his artist in evidence.

I
i

By BARBARA LOVELL
With the opening o% the concert
season, the feminine of the species of
music addicts begins to wonder justj
what would constitute appropriate
dress at Hill Auditorium the night of
Oct. 17.
If you are sitting where you have
to stretch your neck to see the pef-
former's feet, you may indulge in
a degree of formality which would
not be permissible in the top rpw
of the second balcony. A safe stand-f
ard to follow would be the long skirt I
and covered shoulders and back idea.
A black skirt of the new, uncrushable
velvet, brought to life by a gleaming

gold figured satin blouse would be.
absolutely correct for plutocrats with
first-floor center seats.
The reliable black skirt in crepe i
might also be contrasted with a velvett
top in powder-blue velvet. This par-
ticular blouse has short# sleeves.
smocked at the cuff and distinguished1
by the new Shiaparelli-pointed shoul-
ders. Covered buttons march down
the front, adding a tailored air to the,
soft fabric. A pink lace blouse, bright-;
ened by sparkling brilliants, might
constitute an alternate.-
The novel unmarkable velvet ap-
pears again and again in this season's

styles. Made up in a black full-
skirted model, its square neck and
puffed sleeves edged in Irish lace, it!
is suitable for almost any formal oc-
casion. Black velvet is fashioned in'
clinging lines in another dress and
unrelieved except by a band of bright
blue and green sequins around the
waist.
Lace is another of those happy con-
cert-going materials which never
mark or wrinkle. A formal of tur-
quoise lace, fitted on Empire lines,1
and contrasted by dubonnet velvet
ribbon, is made into an informal dress!
for your musical interludes by the

addition of a matching jacket, fast-
cned with little covered buttons.
Evening coats to go over your best i
dress seem to have more imaginationI
this year. The old stand-by black
velvet is still good, but more and
more wraps in dramatic jewel tones
are making their appearance. A royal
blue velvet cape with a white lapi, !
Peter Pan collar is dramatic for al
trek down the aisle, and a dubonnet
velvet lined with swishy taffeta is'
guaranteed to create a disturbance
before the opening notes ring out.
Short flared jackets in rich bro-
cades or moires are for those who

wish something a little different from
the popular velvet. And, of course,
a good fur coat is the perfect comple-
ment to a beautiful formal.
Those who will sit in the balconies
will do better to wear short dresses
and hats if they wish to feel in-
conspicuous. Tailored velveteens are
smartly casual. If you wish, how-
ever, to be more comfortable up in
the farthest reaches of the Auditor-
ium where the temperature is apt
to be rather high by the time inter-
mission rolls around, you might
choose a thin challis or crepe.

{e aA n.!

Th.Ie 193 7 Fifty t Ninth Annual

CHIO AL

UNION

h1

NOTICES

CONCETS

The right is reserved to make such changes
in the programs or in the personnel of partici-
pants as necessity may require. Tickets are
sold at purchaser's risks, and if lost, mislaid,
or detroyed in any manner, the University
Musical Society will not assume responsibility,
nor will duplicates be issued.
Concerts will begin on Eastern Standard
time at 8:30 p.m.
Holders of season tickets are requested to
detach the proper coupon for each concert and
present for admission (instead of the whole
ticket).
Concerts will begin on time, and doors will
be closed during numbers. Late comers will
be required to wait until admitted.
Lost and found articles should be inquired
for at the office of Shirley W. Smith, Vice.
President and Secretary of the University,
University Hall.
Those who leave the auditorium during inter-
mission will be required to present. their ticket
stubs in ord to re-enter.
Traffic regulations will be enforced by the
Ann Arbor Police Department and the Building
and Grounds Department of the University.

*

RachmaninoiffI

Pianist

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27

The Cleveland Orchestra

ARTUR RODZINSKI, Conductor

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9

*

.Richard Crooks,
Fritz. Kreisler, Vi

Tenor

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19

iolinist

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29

1.

*

Boston Symphony Orchestra

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor

WEDNES

For obvious reasons, notices
announced from the stage.
The Steinway is the official
University Musical Society.

will not be
piano of the

*
*

Ruth Slenczynski, Pianist
MON
"Helsinki Universit-y Ch'i6rus
MARTTI TURUNEN, Conductor TUES
Gina Cigna, Soprano
FRI]
The Roth Quartet
THURSI
Georges Enesco, Violinist
Ti

DAY, DECEMBER 8
DAY, JANUARY 10
DAY, JANUARY 18
DAY, JANUARY 28

DAY, FEBRUARY 17

UESDAY, MARCH 1

TICKETS

- A limited number of

TICKETS - A limited number of tickets, either for the
season (10 concerts) or for individual concerts will re-
main on sale "over the counter" so long as they last, at
the business office of the School of Music on Maynard
street.

tickets, either for the season (10
concerts) or for individual concerts
will remain on sole "over the coun-
ter" so long as they last, at the

I

The Helsinki University Chorus.

business office

of the School

of

Music on Maynard street.

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