100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

b, 197 TH E MICHIGAN DAILY

Phi Delts Win
Interfraternity
TracK Crow
Victors Total 30.5 Poi
As Harmon Takes Tw
Theta Xi Is Second
By ROY HEATH
Phi Delta Theta, featuringi
services of freshman footballer T1
Harmon, mopped up the inter-
ternity track meet with a total
30Y/ points yesterday afternoon
Yost Field House. Second place
to Theta Xi with 16'/2 points.
Harmon, Indiana's outstanc
high school athlete last year, g
loped home in the 60-yard dash
the low hurdles to collect 10 po
and high scoring honors. Jim C]
jogged home thirty yards ahead
the field in the one-mile run to
the Phi Delts their only other f:
heavy scoring in the place po
bringing up their total.
Jim Monahan, one of the brigh
lights in Ken Doherty's fresh
sprint crew, scored nine of T
Delt's ten points as he sprinted
whole route for five points in
300 and dropped the 60 by two
to Harmon for another four and
ond high scoring honors.
Bill Buchanan, Sigma Nu, took
the lead at the gun in the 660-
run and stretched it to twenty y
before he broke the tape. Litt
Kappa Nu led all the way over
65-yard high hurdles but beat o
stretch spirit by Phi Delt's H
Cooper by inches to win. Cooper
out by an equally small margir
his teammate Harmon in the
sticks.
The meet originallyscheduledti
held outdoors was run off on
Field House track due to coldinw
ther. The first ten houses finis
in the following order: Phi D
Theta 30/, Theta Xi 162, Phi G
ma Delta 14 7/10, Kappa Nu 13,
U. 11, Theta Delta Chi 10, Chi P
Alpha Delta Phi 8, ATO 6%, Si
Nu 5, Delta U. 5.
SUMMARIES
60 yard high hurdles:
Litt, Kappa Nu.
Cooper, Phi Delta Theta.
Egert, Phi Gamma Delta.
Time: 9.1
60 yard dash:
Harmon, Phi Delta Theta.
Monahan, Theta Delta Chi.
Wolin, Kappa Nu.
Time: 6.6.
660 yard run:
Buhanan, Sigma Nu.
Whitmore, Psi U.
Egert, Phi Gamma Delta
Time: 1:30.4.
65 yard low hurdles:
Harmon, Phi Delta Theta.
Cooper, Phi Delta Theta.
Litt, Kappa Nu.
Time: 7.8.
300 yard dash:
Monahan, Theta Delta Chi.
Breidenbach, Chi Psi.
Spicer, Alpha Delta Phi
Time: 34.2.
One mile run:
Clark, Phi Delta Theta.
Dobson, Phi Kappa.
Hibbard, Chi Psi.
I Time: 5:14.1.
Pole vault: '
Chapman, Psi U
Yunek, Phi Sigma Kappa.
McLaughlin, Theta Xi.
Height: 10 feet 6 inches.
Broad jump:
Wood, Theta Xi.
Harder, Delta U.
Simpson, ATO.
Distance: 18 feet 4 inches.
High jump:
Wier, Theta Xi.
Peckinpaugh, Phi Gamma D
Marsh, ATO.

Height: 5. feet 8 inches.
Shot put:
Hook, Alpha Delta Phi.
Levy, Sigma Alpha Mu.
Root, Phi Delta Theta.
Distance: 40 feet 9%/2 inches.
Golfers Enter Fina
Week Of Cup Pl
Swinging into the second and fi
week of play, the sixteen surviv
of the original 24 starters in
Trueblood Cup competition will ba
it out with mashies and putterso
the University golf course.
Leading the field at the momen
Jim Loar, whose pair of 75's putsl
five strokes ahead of Bob Pal
and Leo Freisinger, both of wh
carded 155 for the first 36 ho
Still in the running, however,
several others, including Lynn R:
160; Frank Black, 157; and Bill I
and Rog Clapp, both with 160.

HAVE IDENTIFICATION CARDS
Ticket Manager Harry Tillotson
has again emphasized that all
students attending the Michigan-
Minnesota game and all other
home football games must present'
student identification cards in
order to gain admittance to the
Stadium.
Varsity Primes
iGuns To Stop
Gopher Aerials'
i k
Intensive Punting Drill Is
Held; Savilla Receives
Painful Injury
The Michigan football coaching
staff is still pouring powder in the
Varsity anti-aircraft guns in prep-
aration for the passing attack which
the Gophers will undoubtedly launch
Saturday.
Added to the coaches' problem was
the injury of Ronald Savilla who suf-
fered a compound dislocation of the
finger. It is expected that he will
be able to start at his tackle position,
however, against the Gophers Satur-
day.
In both Wednesday night's drill
and the practice yesterday afternoon,
pass defense was one of the major
items stressed.4
Are Two Approaches
The coaches are approaching the
problem from two angles; first that
an airtight secondary is necessary,
and, secondly that a fast charging
line which hurries the passer is even
more effective than attempting to
bat down the pass once it is thrown.
One of the greatest difficulties fac-
ing the defensive setup is to cover the
quarterback who breaks through the
center of the line and slants ob-
liquely through the secondary.
Kipke Not Worried
Coach Harry Kipke stated that he
was not worried about the pass de-
fense and that the Varsity would be
ready for any aerial offense that the
Gophers may bring forth Saturday.
The drill yesterday followed rather
closely the order of sessions that has
prevailed all week. Much time was
devoted to kicking however in an at-
tempt to strengthen that department.
After the disappointing way in
which the punting was handled
against Northwestern when the Wol-
verine punts averaged only 251/2 yards
per kick, the coaches, feeling that
good kicking will be necessary Satur-
day, sent the squad through an in-
tensive drill in that department.
FROSH WRESTLERS REPORT
All freshmen interested in wres-
tling please report to Waterman
Gym this afternoon at 4:00 o'clock.
Coach Kelly.

I



ASIDE LINES

00

I

By IRVIN LISAGOR

This Grid Puzzh'
T HIS so-called game of football is
getting a bit beyond our compre-
hension. Or had you suspected be-
fore? Just when we thought we
glimpsed a speck of light in our study
of offensive machinations, along come
guys like Bob Zuppke and Bernie
Bierman with something new-as far
as we're concerned-in defensive tac-
tics.
Against Notre Dame last week, the
sharpest strategist of them all, Zup-
pke, presented his Illini in a 6-2-1-2
defense, designed to smother the
Irish' passing game. McDonald, the
center, and Berner, the quarterback,
played directly behind the line. Two
other backs, Spurgeon and Wehrli,
were stationed on the safety line,
while the fourth back, Carson, oc-
cupied a position in the middle of
this secondary set-up. With the ends
crashing fiercely, Illinois completely
nullified Notre Dame's airplane at-
tack. The Irish couldn't even run
within the Illini 12-yard stripe.
Likewise at Minnesota, Bierman's
fear of a lax defense against an aerial
thrust was substantiated by Nebras-
ka, conquerors of the Gophers on the
{ strength of its passing. So against In-

giana, which featured two good tos-
sers in Corby Davis and Frank Fil-
chock and an excellent receiver ini
Jim Kenderdine, Bierman came up1
with a 5-man defensive line. He had
Horace Bell, his astute colored guard,1
and Dan Elmer, ponderous center, asj
primary line backers. Spadaccini, the
quarterback, Moore, the right half,
and Christianson, the fullback, played
behind them, almost parallel to one
another, withaHaroldVan Every,
Uram's soph understudy, at safety.
The Hoosiers, taken unawares
by this strange set-up, required
an entire half for adjustment.
Even with this surprise formna-
tion, however, the Gophers were
worn to a frazzle by Indiana aer-
ials.
These fluid defensive arrange-
ments complicate the game ap-
preciably. A quarterback is faced
with the coaches' problem when
he finds himself confronted by an
ever - changing d e f e n s e. . The
blocking assignments must neces-
sarily be altered, and the poor
signal-caller, trying to spot flaws
and apply his brand of strategy,
will look up and firnd his oppon-
ents alternately resembling a star,
diamond or potato.
Five-man lines originated in the

Southwest where the pass is used
with the same frequency as a pistol
in the desperado days. Now they're
being introduced around here in an
effort to confuse us more. As though
that were possible.
Gophers Settle Down ,
Reports out of Minneapolis say
the Gophers have finally settled down
to their gridiron chores in earnest.
It bodes no good for our struggling
Wolverines, who seem to have suf-
fered a relapse after the Northwes-
tern game. After all, playing Michi-
gan State and Northwestern in two
successive Saturdays-with Minne-
sota following-takes plenty out of.
the human frame. And the boys find
it hard remaining keyed up that long.
Minnesota's bound to snap out of
its apparent lethargy rsoon, and the
local hope is that the Norsemen will
wait until Oct. 23. There's a poten-
tial mine of dynamite in Bierman's
crew and it might explode here. Of
course, last year's method in Bier-
man's madness, Bud Wilkinson, is
missing, as are Ed Widseth and Bud
Svendsen, great linemen. But Uram,
Midler, Reed, King, Gmitro, Buhler,

Chi Phis Triumph
In I-MSpeedhall
The interfraternity speedball com-
petition continued yesterday despite
weather that was more suitable for
ice hockey. Alpl1a Delta Phi won a
game from Kappa Sigma on a forfeit,
while Chi Phi downed Sigma Alpha
Mu 10 to 8. In thetother game Kappa
Nu came out on the short end of a
6 to 4 game with Pi Lambda Phi.
With a strong aerial attack Chi
Phi was able to run up a score in the
first half of their game with S.A.M.,
but were forced to stave off a strong
second half rally of their opponents.
Harvey Wadsworth, Berry Ratliff, and
John Saeman all scored three points
for the winners, while Art McIntyre
made the tenth tally.
Don Stein was high point man for
the S.A.M. team as were Paul Soboroff
for Pi Lambda Phi and Bob Harrison
of the Kappa Nu outfit.
Bell, etc., etc...darerpresent and very
jmuch accounted for.

I

I-M SPORTS TODAY
5:15-Speedball. Phi Sigma
Delta-Theta Delta Chi.
-r-
Dots and Dashes-John Jordan,
Chicago Alumni Award winner in
1936 and reserve center on the Varsity
squad last season, had three fingers
sliced off in a Detroit machine show
recently and is through as a center,
should he re-enter school next fall.
RAMBLER-o
IS AMERICA'S SMARTEST
ALL-PURPOSE COAT

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
O'Coat Sale
20% Off
$45 Vicuna Coats ...$36
$40 Mangora Coats ...$32
Mangora Topcoats $28.50
All Reversible Topcoats
$16.75
WALK A FEW STEPS
AND SAVE DOLLARS
KUOHN NS
YOUNG MEN'S SHOP
205 E. Liberty Phone 8020
OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS

11

-- _

=

Superior
MILK-ICE CREAM
Week-End Special
TWO-LAYER BRICK
ORANGE-PINEAPPLE and VANILLA
Superior Dairy Company
Phone 23181

I

I

N

,i

F,

FOR FALL 1937
and WINTER

"

U

-------

BOOK SALE
50% DISCOUNT
First Editions, Fiction, Biogra-
phy, History, Current Problems
Many lOc, 25c, 50c
ANTIQUE and BOOK MART
Fourth and Ann Streets
Chamber of Commerce Bldg.
Walk a Few Steps
and Save Money.
PLATE LUNCHES
15c 20c
WAYN E
COFFEE SHOP
201 East Liberty
ARMORY
DANCE
WED.-FRI .-SAT.
Music By
HERB "RED" RITZ
10-PIECE BAND
Early-Bird Price, 8:30-9:00
Auspices
Company K, Armory Board

THE

WINDS WILL BLOW
0 0 0 S
And we will have snow
. . . .
So prepare yourself with
a real warm overcoat..
Warm but light weight .. .
and styled to your correct
model.
SUIT
O'CQAT-TO PCQAT

RAMBLER gives you every-
thing. RAMBLER is more
than just another topcoat-
ing fabric-it is of a weath-
erproof, wrinkle-proof tex-
tu re.
RAMBLER is an exclusive
material made only by
H A R T., SCHAFFNER &
MARX under their own su-
pervision and to their own
rigid specifications.

$

50

PRICED AT ONLY

1ii

After

Miltons Economy
SUIT or O'COAT
$18.50

Any
Size
Shape
or Model

$3500
Hart, Schaffner & Marx
clothes sold exclusively in
Ann Arbor at
Conlin-

The Dances
Visit the

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan