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October 10, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ITLE MICHIGAN DAILY SUN

Nv, OCT. 10, 193

S. CALIF. .....13
OHIO STATE .. 12

NIYTRE DAME.. 0 CALIFORNIA .. 27 NEBRASKA ...
ILLINOIS ...... 0 WASH. STATE0. 0 IOWA STATE . .

20 MANHATTAN .. 3 WISCONSIN ... 27 ARMY.......
7 MICH. STATE .. 0 CHICAGO . . 0 j COLUMBIA .. .

21 PITTSBURG ... 6
18 DUQUESNE .... 0

Carl

Hubbell Keeps

Giants

In

World

Series

With

7-3

Win

1.1

4->-

Rump Hadley
Loses Despite
GreatSupport
Screwball Master Cheeks
Yank Power As Giants
Make Three Errors
POLO GJOUNDS, New York, Oct.
9.--(P)-Though still showing trades
of grogginess from the effets of pre-
vious punishment, the New York Gi-
ants got up off the floor today and
punched out a 7 to 3 victory over the
Yankees in the fourth game of the
World Series.
Carl Hubbell, the king of National
League southpaws, came back with
a superb six-hit pitching performance
to halt the rampage of the world
champions and save the Giants from
the humiliation of taking it on the
chin four straight times.
Leiber Bolsters Ontfield
The Giants themselves, with big
Hank Leiber back in centerfield and
providing a cjanup wallop they had
not previously shown in three straight
setbacks, blasted Irving (Bump)
Hadley from the box with a six-run
attack In the second inning. That
was twice as many runs as the Na-
tional Leaguers tallied in three pre-
ceding matches and it was more than
enough to win behind Hubbell's great
flinging.
Despite the fact he had only two
full days of rest between assignments
and was again victimized by ragged
support, Hubbell was master of the
proceedings at every critical stage.
Lou Gehrig's ninth-inning homer, a
terrific wallop into the lower right
field stands, was the only solidly
achieved Yankee run. The other two
were virtual gifts as the Giants, with
three infield errors, ran their total
for the series to nine misplays, a rec-
ord for four games of which they are
not the least proud.
GM6eez To Pitch For Yanks
The Bronx Bombers, held off in
their bid for another "slam,'' will
rely upon Lefty Vernon Gomez to
pitch the fifth game tomorrow at the
Polo Grounds. Gomez, unbeaten in
four World Series starts and victor
over Hubbell in this year's opener,
will be opposed by the Giants' fresh-
man southpaw, Cliff Melton. It will
mnark Melton's third appearance. He
was knocked out in the second game
and did a two-inning relief job in the
third.
Despite chilly weather and over-
cast skies, 44,293 fans turned out to
watch the belated come-back of the
Giants. Jeers and cat-calls echoed
from the stands as the Giants took
the field at the outset but they soon
changed to cheers as the National
leaguers took command in their first
batting splurge of the series. The
rafters rocked with the roar of the
throng as Hubbell silenced Most of
the Yankee siege guns and finally sur-
vived a threatening blast in the final
frame.
Big Ten Standings

Michigan State Loses To Manhattan;
0 s Illinois Holds Irish To Scoreless I

1'ie

Michigan State
Michigan. 6

7

1 I

W'qb.vHOW cis I

(By Associated Press)
EAST
American U, 7. St. John's
(Annapolis) 7 (tie).
Amherst 79, Norwich 6.
Bates 32, Arnold 6.
Boston U. 20, Slippery Rock 0.
Bowdoin 13, Wesleyan 0.
Renssalaer Poly. 13, Brooklyn
College 7.
Buffalo 12, Rochester 7.
Albright 34, City College of New
York 0.
Colby 13, Lowell Textile 0.
Colgate 34, St. Bonaventure 0.
Dartmouth 42, Springfield 0.
Dickinson 15, Ursinus 0.
Drexel 26, Franklin and Marshall
25.
Fordham 48, Waynesburg 0.
Holy Cross 27, Georgetown 6.
Kutztown (Pa.) Teachers 42, Wil-
son Teachers 0.
s diana (Pa. Teachers 26,
Bloomsburg Teachers 6.
Lehigh 32, Johns Hopkins 0.
Connecticut State 36, Massachu-
setts State 7.
Clarion (Pa.) Teachers 29,
Alliance Junior College 0.
Lock Haven (Pa.) Teachers 26,
Cortland (NY) Teachers 7. .
Villanova Freshmen 27, Dickinson
Seminary 0.
Virginia Military 7, Davidson 0.
North Carolina 19, New York U. 6.
Penn State 20, Bucknell 14.
SOUTH
Tennessee 0, Duke 0. (tie).
Georgia Tech 32, Kentucky 0.
Vanderbilt 17, Southwestern
(Tennessee) 6.
Maryland 6, Western Maryland 0.
William and Mary 12, Virginia
. Tech 0.
Randolph-Macon 33, Guilford 0.
Oglethorpe 7, Wofford 0.

NEW YORK. Oct. 9.-(A)-The
trusty toe of Ed Kringle, strapping
Manhattan College halfback, gave
the Jaspers their first major victory
of the season today when they eked
out a 3-0 decision over a highly fa-
vored eleven from Michigan State
College before 10,000 spectators at
Ebbets Field.
Late in the third quarter, Kringlc
negotiated a field goal from State's
12-yard line for the only points in a
game that was mainly a battle of two
powerful, well-drilled lines and fea-
tured by the breaks.
Michigan State, conqueror of Mich-
igan last week and touted as one of
the stronger teams in the west, turned
on all its power in the last quarter
and charged 32 yards down the field,
apparently headed for a touchdown,
but the drive failed when a pass from
Pingle intended for Walter Nelson
was knocked down on the 5-yard line
and Manhattan took over on downs.
ILLINI HOLD IRISH
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., Oct. 9.-(/P)-
The "Fighting Illini" lived up to the
glorious tradition of their name with
the gridiron upset of the day by
holding the vaunted Notre Dame elev-
en to a scoreless tie today in the first
game between these teams in 39 years.
There was everything of a surpris-
ing nature about the outcome of the
battle before a crowd of 45,000.
No finer tribute could be offered
Bob Zuppke than the performance of
his untried sophomores, who not only
fought back the "Fighting Irish," but
actually took the play away from
them on offense.
Each team made one serious threat
to score in the first half and Illinois
made another halfhearted one in the
final quarter. In the first period

Illinois marched 46 yards to Notre
Dame's 14, where the Irish held, and
Melvin Brewer was called into the
game to attempt a place kick from
l the 21 yard line. The boot was short
and low and dropped harmlessly in
front of the goal posts.
BADGERS WEAR DOWN MAROONS
CHICAGO, Oct. 9.-(IP)-A heavier
University of Wisconsin eleven wore
down an inexperienced University of
Chicago team today and romped away
with a 27 to 0 victory in the opening
Big Ten game for both teams.
Wisconsin scored once in the first,
failed by inches in the second, re-
sumed scoring again in the third and
climaxed the day with a pair of
touchdowns in the final period.
Forward passes figured in all the
scoring. Benz took a 15 yard pass
and ran 15 yards for the first touch-
down. Weiss place kicked the extra
point. Neil Pohl, Wisconsin captain,
intercepted a desperate Chicago pass
in the third period on his own 29
and ran 64 yards to the four yard
line. Weiss carried the ball over on
his second shot at the line, but his
try for the extra point was blocked,
GOPHERS STUMBLE BUT WIN
MINNEAPOLIS, Oct. 9.-O')-Min-
nesota's thoroughly deflated Golden
Gophers squeezed out a 6 to 0 victory
over University of Indiana today in
a Big Ten game that found "Bo"
McMillen's scrappy squad failing in
two last period attempts to pull the
game out of the fire.
The final gun barked as a Hoosier
pass fell incomplete on the Minnesota
goal line. Indiana in the last of two

mighty thrusts passed cagily to the
Minnesota nine for a first down. An
end sweep lost four; there was a five
yard penalty for too much time in the
huddle and then the last desperate
futile pitch.
Just a few minutes earlier, a fourth
down Hoosier pass from the five yard
line missed the intended receiver in
the end zone by inches.
Those two spectacular drives
packed all the Indiana scoring threats
of the day and four of the five Hoos-
ier first downs came in the last few
minutes of play, mainly through the
accurate passing of Bill Anderson
and Frank Filchock to halfback Dale
Tanner and Captain "Jick" Kender-
dine, end. Ten of 28 Indiana for-
wards were good.
WHEN RULES WERE NOT
It is probable that football was
first played in the United States late
in the 18th century. It was far dif-
ferent from the game of today. The
players had no rules. They merely
kicked around an inflated bladder.
The longest kicker was champion of
the day.

Michigan State
«$,7
Bennett
Baker
Pogor
Cousino
Eby
Asher
La Ross
Hartnacke
H. Hill
:Drake
Van Stratt

LE
L,
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
Q
LH
RH
F

Michigan
B -6
Cushing
Kramer
Belsky
Huttoil
Ulevitch
Weiner
Penvenne
Ochs
Gates (c)
Ricketts
Kinsey

Cornell Triumphs
Over Tigers, 20-7
PRINCETON, N. J., Oct. 9.-()-
Cornell's big red football team drove
onward toward fame and glory today
by overpowering an inexperienced but
stubborn Princeton eleven 20 to 7, be-
fore a cheering crowd of about 45,-
000 in vast Palmer Stadium.
Conquerors of Penn State and Col-
gate, the stalwarts from high above
Cayuga's waters put on a convincing
show of their might on the ground
and their finesse in the air. Combin-
ing both modes of attack effectively
in the second half after trailing by a
7-6 margin at the intermission, they
gained their first triumph over the
Tiger since 1931 and thereby avenged
humiliating defeats of the past three
years.
ACE
1,MLAUNDRY
SPECIAL STUDENT
SERVICE

SUBSTITUTIONS: IvMichigan; Good-!
win, LE; Courtney, LH. Michigan
State: second team for first, third
team for second.
SCORING: Touchdowns; Hartnacke,
Kinsey. Points after touchdown: H.
Hill.
Additional Scores
MIDWEST
Detroit 34, Texas Tech..0.
Marshall 7, Miami U. (Ohio) 0.
Western Reserve 7, Ohio U. 0.
Case 12, Wooster 7.
Akron 7, Geneva 0.
Missouri 14, Kansas State 7.
Oberlin 0, Kenyon 0. (tie).
Hope 7, Hillsdale 0.

Call
Ph.

for further information
4303 1212 S. Univ.

.

I

Ph.

Hoe7_ilsa 0 ..
liT

CertaDeiplyPr..es
We Develop Pictures

Photo
eveloping
WHY NOT start taking pic-
tures yourself, It's a great
hobby, which leaves you with
something to show for your la-
bor.
We have a supply of EAST-
MAN KODAKS, priced very
reasonably. Also, if you would
like to develop your own pic-
tures we have a most econom-
ical developing and printing
set.
Come in and let us complete
your photography kit so you'll
have some good pictures of the
next game.

So do ;nany other places. But
the main difference comes in
the printing. It is when this
stage is reached that the super-
iority of FRANCISCO &
BOYCE developing is observed.
Bring your pictures of the
game to us - we s5ecialize in
action pictures. Come in and
let us .show you some of our
action shots. We also do ex-
cellent enlarging; bring your
shapshots in to be made into
a fine large picture for your
desk or dresser.

Ca cfkld9ltIb~c I ta

W. L.
Ohio State ........1 0
Minnesota ........1 0
Wisconsin .........1 0
Northwestern ......1 0
Illinois ...........0 0
Iowa. ............0 0
Michigan .........0 1
Indiana ..........0 1
Purdue...........0 1
Chicago..........0 1

T.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Pet.
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.006

totJ

waNt

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Francisco & Boyce
SINCE 1905

HIGH SCIjOOL FOOTBALL
Saginaw Arthur Hill 0; Flint
~Ntrn vj*4~4. 4 0 (.t ,.ip)I

719 North University

221 S. 4th

1Y

vui ileltl tU 1 lLiel F
- ____w_ . _._ _A._ :.:__ - - ---
_--
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t,,; _ -_ - . .a __._ ,gill

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