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October 10, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Irimm Sees News Photography
In Need Of More Discrimination

Places Exhibit
Of Gases Here
New Apparatus Supplants
Quite Similar Machine;
DisplaysMetals, Carbon
An exhibit of carbon, metals andj
gases and their derivative productsI
-the only one of its kind ever de-
vised-is now on. display in the lobby
of the East Engineering Building.
The apparatus on display, which
combines. both motion and varied
lighting effects to demonstrate the
value of the substances, is sponsored
by the Union Carbide and Carbon
Corp., of which Jesse J. Ricks, '01 and
'03L, is president. It supplants a
somewhat similar exhibit was estab-
lished here 13 years ago by the same
corporation.
While the exhibit will be here per-
manently, it will be taken back to the
factory for changes if it does not-
prove satisfactory, Prof. A. H. White,
head of the chemical engineering
department, said yesterday. It was
because of his suggestion that the
other exhibit was deemed inade-
quate, he said.
The machine is divided into two ,
sections. l'he first exhibits carbon
and allied substances in four window
displays which include, "Carbon and
Gases"; "Synthetic Organic Chem-
icals"; "Carbons and Batteries" and
"Alloys and Metal." The other shows'
four series of slides which elaborate
on the displays. Buttons control the
action of the slides and moving parts
at the observer's will.
Unique in this apparatus is that a
replica of practically every substance
shown is supplied in the bottom of'
the apparatus used in classes, Pro-1
fessor White said.

NEWS IN BRIEF,

By MONROE SCHWARTZ
"Unless controlled and directed in
the interests of an intelligent public
opinion, news pictures may more and
more tend to betray newspaper prac-
tices." Such is the judgment of Prof.1
John L. Brumm of the Department
of Journalism, expressed in an inter-
view relative to the sudden popular-I
ity of picture magazines and the in-
creasing use of pictures in the daily
press.
A distinction should be made, Pro-
fessor Brumm declared, between im-
portant news and news that is mere-
ly interesting. Important news, he
said, embraces all those matters
which have vital social significance.1
Important matters are not always-
perhaps not usually-superficially in-
teresting.
A fiscal report issued by a state
treasurer, he pointed out, may be
much less exciting than a good dog
fight, but it need not be so. An in-
telligent reporter, he added, may dis-
cover in an intricate financial state-
ment sufficient drama to stimulate
the heartbeats and raise the ire of
even the dullest citizen, but the dog
fight is easier to photograph.
The public is becoming increasingly
picture-minded, Prof. Brumm be-
lieves. This he attributes very largely
to the popularity of the motion pic-
ture, which has made reading un-
attractive, if not unnecessary to great
numbers of people.
While the camera may reveal the
wonders of science and recreate his-
tor yin a vivid realism, it may easily
substitute fictions for reality. He
called attention to the foreigner's
probable misconception of American

life as depicted in American movies
sent abroad. These pictures, he stats, Ld Detroit
exhibit us as extravagant and waste-
ful, given to continuous drinking of MUSSOLINI TURNS HIS SHOUL- MILLIONS FOR 'PROMISED'
potent beverages, sophisticated and DER. Premier Benito Muss olini LAND. Seven hundred delegates, at-
daring, morally inhibited, and devot- plunged Great Britain and France tending a national conference of the
into a new p' edicament last night Jewish National Fund of America lastj
ed exclusively to love and racketeer- with a note turning a cold shoulder night in Detroit, heard reports show-
ien. ofthe d.i toward the Spanish peace efforts of ing that Jews throughout the world
News of these days is dramatic, the two powers. have contributed $24,000,000 for the
complex, andar-yrsaging te- acquisition of land in Palestine.
quires keen analysis and authentic -

Psychologists
Vwork -On Eve
Acuteness Test.
A new method of testing visual,
acuteness, expected to supplant pre-
sent methods, is being perfected by
Prof. Carl R. Brown and Dr. Burton
D. Thuma of the psychology depart-
ment.
Professor Brown, in an interview
yesterday, said that uncertainty of
the Snellen and Landolt tests, now
used by oculists, resulted in this fur-
ther experimentation. He added that
it was impossible to say which of the
tests is better, because of the arbitrary
nature of the definition of visual
acuteness.
The Snellen test uses the letter
"E" which the observer sees in various
positions, each time he is asked the
direction in which the bars of the "E"
are pointing.
The Landolt ring test, used mainly
in Europe, employs the same princi-
ple, but the "E" is replaced by a ring
with a break in the circumference.
The observer, in this case, is asked the
position of the gap.
The test being perfected here, Pro-

fessor Brown explained, uses an el-
lipse with a. small dot in the center as
the object. From the data.compiled
thus far, he said, it has been found
that the shape of the ellipse varies
greatly in each case.
This shows that each individual is
stimulated differently, Prof. Brown
explains thatthis is caused by the
varied positions of the cells in the
retina of the eye.
The cells are covered by the mi..
nutely small ellipse.
This line of experimentation was
started about five years ago under the
joint sponsorship of the: American
Medical Society and the American
Society of Ophthalmologists.
When the test is carried out, Pro-
fessor Brown said, the subject is seat-
ed at one end of a small dark room.
.An ellipse is projected on the far
wall and the patient asked the posi-
tion of the spot inside. A glass prism
in front of the subject is turned in
four different positions. This ofters
the line of vision four times.
The subject signals the position in
which he sees the spot by pressing a
buzzer a number of times. Each
position in the ellipse is designated by
a number.
Read Daily ClassifiedAds

recording, Prof. Brumm holds. Events
must be projected -against a back-
ground of history. Every picture that
deserves publication should be as val-
uable in imparting information as
the verbal copy it displaces.
As for pictur'es that are aestheti-
cally valuable, and even those which
depict what is strange and incongru-
ous, Prof. Brumm thinks that they
should be published as newspaper
supplements. By the same token the
news columns should exhibit only
pictures that have real news value.
Such pictures will have to be taken
by the trained reporter rather than
by commercial and staff photograph-
ers, as is mostly the case today.

F'aris

MORE ITALIANS IN SPAIN?
Sources close to the French Foreign
Office yesterday said a special cab-
inet meeting Monday will study
French Secret Service reports alleg-
ing new movements of Italian troops
to Spain.;
Spainj
FRANCO PRESSES ON GIJON.
Spanish Insurgents hurled their full
strength into battle today to blast a
path for a final advance on Gijon,
the Government's last Biscayan
stronghold.

S Muskegon
INVITATION TO A PARLEY. A
telegram was dispatched to Gov.
Frank Murphy last night by the
United Radio, Electrical, and Ma-1
chine Workers, a CIO affiliate, ask-1
ing that he meet with their repre-
sentatives at his office in Lansing at
10 a.m. Monday and attempt to aid
them in settling their differences
with the Consumers Power Co.
245 MILES OF PIPE UNDER CITY
A network of pipes stretch under
Ann Arbor. There are 145 miles of
gas mains, 30 of storm sewer and 70
of sanitary sewer.

CHORA

F

hitler

Criticized

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

1- I I I .,

WJR
P.M.
6 :00-Joe Penner.
6 :30-Romantic.
7:30--Open House.
7:30-Phil Baker.
8:00-Columbia Wprkshop,
8:30-Birthday Party.
9:00-Sunday Evening Hour.
1 0:00-,Tack Randolph.
10:15--Comedy Stars.
10 :30-Hermit's Cave.
11 :00-Glen Gray.
11:30-Ca.b Caloway.
12 :00-Henry King.
WWJ
P.M.
6:00-Catholic Hour.
61:30-Smoothies.
6:45-Sports.
7:00-Jack Benny.
7:30-Fireside Recital.
7 45-Interesting Neighbors.'
8,:00-Charley McCarthy.
9:00-Manhattan Merry-Go-Round.
9:30-'Familiar Music.
10:00-Sunday Night Party.
11:00-Dance Music.
11:30-News, Music.
WXYZ
P.M.
6-00-George Jessel.
6:30-Green Brothers.
7:00-Dinner Concert.
7 :30-Ozzie Nelson.
8 :00-Qrchestra, Soloists.
9:00-Hollywood Playhouse.
9:30-Walter Winchell.
9:45Irene Rich,
10 :00-Fousdat ion.
10:30-Cheerio.
1'1 :00-Juidy and Bunch.
11:0-Eddie Varzos.
12 :00-Fredlie Rivard.
CKLW
P.M.
6:00-George Jessell.
6:30-Tim and Irene.
7:00-Sports.
7:15-News.
7:30-Ted Weems.
8:00-Stardust Revue.
8:30-Wayne King.
9:00-Passing Parade.
9:30-Pontiac aptst.
J0:00-Goodwill.
10:30-Gospel Services.
11:30-Reporter.
11:45-Ted Weems.
12:00-George Olsen.

By Upper Classes
Frankema States
Secret criticism of Hitler and his
regime is noticeable among the bet-
ter-educated classes, while the rest of
the German pouplace appears too
busy directing their efforts toward
earning a living to evidence their dis-
content toward economic and political
conditions, Dr. William Frankema of
the philosophy department, who has
recently returned from Germany,
claimed yesterday.
A certain amount of discretion is
used by those who complain of the
Nazi government, according to Dr.
Frankema who said that "persons
with complaints make very sure that
those to whom they air their views
are in no way connected with the
governm~ent."
Dr. Frankenia described Hitler's at-
titude towards non-party members as
"arrogant and arbitrary." Party
members, he said, as a rule, are more
privileged than those unaffiliated
with the Naz'is.
Present in Europe at the time of
the rise of leftist government in
France, he noticed the enormous
amount of anti-communistic propa-
ganda filling the newspapers and
periodicals. Der Fuhrer, he said, seems
to be making very strenuous efforts
towards influencing public opinion
away from any tendency towards
democracy and socialism.
SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe, tap, acrobatics.
caught daily. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9895
2nd Floor. Open eves.

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