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October 08, 1937 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-10-08

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EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RIDAY, OCTI. 5,'19*37

Uncle Sam, Builder, Balked In Plans

Uncle Sam builds houses for carefully selected families-but some-
times gets in Dutch as in East Lampeter township, Pa., where Amish
"plain people" have boycotted a $125,000 WPA-financed high school,
announced they would carry the fight to the Supreme Court. This one
has just inspected the building.
Parliamentar Trial Gave Japan
Her Opportunity, Stanton Claims
Situation In Mediterranean ment in the Mediterranean-Spanish
Alen F A tn question further helped to create an

Father Berry Liquor Board Seeks Aid Police Watch Over Dr. Gjerstad Talks
R tToOf Murphy For Meeting Wire Workers Line On Cyprus Today
Returns To Be LANSING, Oct. 7.-'P)-The State__
1 Liquor Control 'Commission sought PORT HURON. Mich., Oct. 7. E
Studeu t Priest the advice of Gov. Frank Murphy to- P Approxin atel 100 police and
________day before meeting Friday to vote on4 special deputy sheriffs watched to- Swedish Academy in Rome will lec-
day over a Committee for Industrial ture a 4:15 p.m. today in Natural
To Head St. Mary's Chapel a new set of regulations to govern Organization picket line at the gates Science Auditorium on, "The Excava-
commission licensees. of the American Enameled Magnet tions in Cyprus."
And Assist Father Carey it was understood commission Wire Co. plant here as officials voiced Dr. Gjerstad was director of the
At St. Thomas Parish members asked the Governor how he fears thpt peace would not prevail Swedish Cyprus expedition from
stood regarding the recent commis- much longer. 1927 to 1931 During this period arch-
sion anti-gambling rule that virtually Pickets of the United Automobile aeological material ranging from
Formerly:associated with the iWorkers of America and non-strikers Neolithic to Roman times was col-
University as a student in 1926 and cleared drinking establishments of the have threatened to clash several times lected. Dr. Gierstad's expedition is
1927, the Rev. Fr. James Berry re- slot machines. The rule has since since the UAWA called a strike at known for the scientific manner in
turned recently to act as chaplain of split the commission. the plant Saturday. which it was conducted.
St. Ma y's Chapel -for Catholic stu- -_______
dents accepting the responsibility for
the spiritual guidance and church ac-
tivities-of more than 800 CatholicA
studnts.ATTENTION
students.
Upon the departure of the Rev. Fr.
Allen Babcock to serve as vice-rector
of the American College in Rome, peCial w Sarurday,10:15 p.m
Father Berry was appointed by Arch-
bishop Mooney to serve as assistant to No Seats Reserved
the Rev. Fr. Thomas Carey, rector of
the St. Thomas Parish, to take charge
of the St. Mary's Chapel. ".a I ' I I n i Co vined hathe h d msse hi
calling, Father Berry left the Univer-
sity in 1927 before the completion of (Kermese Heroique)
his second year to finish his educa-
tion at the Detroit Catholic Seminar. Also MICKEY MOUSE Short
Four years later, he began his grad-
uate training for priesthood at Mt. St.
Mary's Seminar in Cincinatti. For ART CINEMA LEAGUE
the last three years Father Berry
seived as assistant at the St. Leo's Friday and Saturday, October 8 and 9, at 8:15 p. m.
Parrish in Detroit and has now ad-
Chapel to Chaplain of St. Mary's Opening Friday Matinee at 3:15
Father Berry will leave Ann Arbor
Saturday to attend a two-day confer- Box Office Now Open -Tickets 35c
ence of the Secular College Group
subsidiary of the Catechelical Con- y
=res of the Confraternity of Chris- -
tion Doctrains, in St. Louis. Among
well known priests to attend the con-
ference are the Rev. T. S. Riggs, Yale
University; the Rev. George B. Ford,
Columbia University, the Rev. John
Keogh, University of Pennsylvania;
the Rev. G. F. Ryan, Syracuse
University; and the Rev. P. V. Beck-
ley O.P., Princeton University.
The present Catholic Students'
Chapel, Father Berry pointed out, was
erected in 1925 through the efforts of
the Rev. Michael Burke, who was pas-
tor of the student group for several
years. Allen Babcock came to the'
church in 1928, and for nine years
uided the student group in their re-
l'gious activities. y.. .
-
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Next to Pretzel Bell
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'4

er so rucu II pp
Drive For Territory
ry
m, Japanese militarists took advantage
r- of this year's parliamentary crisis in
in Tokyo and cf the preoccupation of
m the Western powers with the Mediter-
e- ranean situation to strike at China's,
g growing military strength, Dr. John
W. Stanton of the history department
Ss said yesterday in an interview. '
i This latest Nipponese "adventure"
Sis merely another chapter in Japan's
program to "carve oit for herself
a political and economic sphere of in-
fluence in North China," Dr. Stan-
ton stated.
Russia, chief obstacle to Japanese
aggression in North, China, is con-
cerned over her relations with Nazi
Germany, Dr. Stanton declared, and
has adopted a policy of "watchful
waiting rather than active interven-
tion in the Sino-Japanese conflict."
This summer Japan tested the So-
viets' attitude by a feint along the
Amur River and was convinced that
Russia was in no mood to precipitate
a diplomatic crisis, Dr. Stanton said.
The European powers' embroil-

ideal situation, Dr. Stanton declared,I
for Japan to occupy as much of China
as possible. In accordance with
Oriental psychology, the Japanese
hoped to be able to "haggle success-
fully once they had something in
their hands," he stated.
Tokyo May Ask Favors
Tokyo, if victorious, may ask great-I
er economic privileges in Central
China or the erection of a semi-
autonomous or autonomous state in
North China, to be usced as a base for
alienating North from South and
Central China, according to the prin-
ciple of "divide and rule," Dr. Stan-
ton declared.
China's ability to weather the re-
cent economic crisis, Dr. Stanton
pointed out, helped to convince Japan
that only an "immediate blow would
nip in the bud China's rearmament
and unification." Tokyo is willing,
the historian asserted, to "allow Chi-
na to possess military strength just
sufficient to cope with internal dis-
orders, like Communist activities, but
not enough to ward off Japanese at-
tacks."
Japs Set Up 21 Demands
In 1915 Japan, taking advantage
of Europe's preoccupation with the
World War, presented China with the
f a m o u s "Twenty-one Demands,"
which would have resulted in "Nip-
nonese domination of North China,"
Dr. Stanton explained. The demands
were rejected by China, he continued.
At the end of the World War, the
Japanese tried to take the province
of Shantuhg, but were thwarted by
the "firm attitude of President Wil-
scn and other interested parties," Dr.
Stanton said.
ELECTRICAL UNION TO MEET
Ann Arbor Local No. 744 of the
United Electrical, Radio and Machine
Workers of America, a CIO affiliate.
will meet at 8 p.m. today in the offices
of the union, 513 East Washington
St. Demands to be presented to the
inte national Radio Corp. will be dis-
cussed.

Schaeberle Music House
533 East Liberty Phone 6011

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