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June 01, 1938 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1938-06-01

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r

PRESS
PASSES

THE MICHIGAN DAILY eAL NYM
Wolverines Shatter Long California Winning Streak

V\

-BY BUD BENJAMIN-
Men From The West .,..
STUDYING HARD for finals? Yes
and who isn't? Well, among
others, a happy-go-lucky squad of
travelers from Berkeley, Calif., who
blew into town late Monday night, en-
jdyed the local sights, played nine
innings of baseball, and headed East
via pullman, looking for new worlds
to conquer.
They didn't do much conquer-
ing yesterday afternoon, dropping
a shoddy ball game to Michigan,
s to 6. But after all, what's a
ball game or two when you're on
the loose And, ladies and gentle-
men, this University of California
baseball team hasn't a worry in
the world.
They finished final exams May 15.
They left the Golden West that same
day. Across the country they sped,
stopping off frequently for baseball
relaxation and a lot of scenic enjoy-
ment. No ordinary outfit is this
California baseball team. They start-
ed their Pacific Coast schedule at
the end of January and proceeded to
win 26 out of 30 games and a Con-
ference title during the season. Hav-
ing started school a month early, they
Swiped up their examination com-
mittments and headed East looking
for new competition.
Their record has been excel-
lent. Ten straight victories were
recorded prior to their Michigan
defeat. Their victims were Den-
ver, Nebraska, Luther, Minnesota
(twice), Wisconsin, Northwes-
tern, Michigan State, Notre
Dame and Western State. They
blew up and committed no less
than eight errors yesterday, but
that's excusable for a team on
tour and riding for a fall after
an impressive record. Then, too,
Michigan played a forcing game
yesterday, bunting frequently and
extending the Bears atalltimes.
Evenin defeat, the Westerners
showed plenty of ciass and abili-
ty. In short,they have the stuff.
Their trip isn't over by a long
shot. Scheduled games are still
pending with Cornell, Princeton,
Yale, Harvard, Pennsylvania,
Amherst, Williams, and Dart-
mouth. Interspersed in the
schedule is a three-day holiday
in New York-they're anxious to
see the Yanks perform-and then
they'll wend their way home. The
return route is via the Canadian
Rookies, Lake Louise Banff and
Vancouver. Then they'll hop a
boat to Seattle, and the final
jump is the train ride to Berke-
ley, where they'll arrive June 23.
Talked to their Coach Clinton Ev-
ans, an affable gentleman, who in-
formed us that this trip was the finest
athletic journey he'd ever made or
hope to make. Naturally, we asked
him about Sam Chapman, All-Ameri-
can football star from Cal. and dia-
mond star par excellence, who re-
cently went up with the Athletics.
"He is a great ball player," said
Evans. "He likes his baseball
even more than football, and he
was a real star on the gridiron.,
Last year he hit .411 for us, and
before he joined Philadelphia his
average for the season was .369.
Will he make good? Say, I talked
to Connie Mack in Chicago last
week, and he told me that Chap-
man was his center fielder all the
way. Ife's already made good."
"How's the interest in college base-
ball out there?" we asked.
"Well," he replied, "we usually
draw between 4,000 and 6,000 for
our Conference games. The
U.S.C. game this year drew 7,000
people, which is a real crowd."

We did not argue that point. We
were too numb to argue. Hand me my
accounting book, Jeeves-and oh yes,
any western train schedules. This
"go, West young man" has a mystic
appeal.
Congratulations, Peck.. .
CONGRATULATIONS to W a I t
Peckinpaugh, newly elected Var-
sity baseball captain. He has won
his new job in the same way he has
won everything else-by hard work,
ability, and lots of it. Peck is in a
peculiar position. He carries a base-
ball name which bears a lot of pres-
tige. Roger Peckinpaugh, his father,
is a former major league star of re-
pute, but Peck has never used that
name to open any doors to success.
He hasn't had to. A baseball player
from the ground up, young Peckin-
paugh has cut his own niche and will
continue to do so.
An excellent defensive man, a
good hitter, and a real gent,
Walt will make a go of his new
job. He's the kind of a fellow
who asks no quarter and doesn't
have to give any.
His Dad saw the game yesterday.

Baseball Team
Outplays Bears
In 8-6 Contest
Peckinpaugh Is Elected
1939 Captain By Mates;
Letterwinners Named
(Continued from Page 1)
another pair in the second frame. The
score remained 3-1 until the fourth
when the California bats began to
boom. Duzabeau first up, lined one
of Smith's fast balls far over Pink's
head in center for one of the longest
circuit clouts of the year. Firpo fol-
lowed with a single and counted
Bob McNamara's triple to deep right-
center. The latter scored on Ray
Winterbottom's fly to Pink to put
the Bears ahead, 4-3.
The Wolverines regained the lead
in their turn, scoring twice on safe
The Varsity baseball team, be-
hind the three-hit pitching of
Herm Fishman, celebrated Mem-
orial Day by shutting out Michi-
gan State, 3-0 at East Lansing,
Monday. Fishman, hurling his
final game for Michigan, avenged
an earlier defeat by the Spar-
tans. Elmer Gedeon, Don Brew-
er, and Charley Pink paced the
Wolverine hitting attack with
two safeties apiece.
bunts by Pink and Don Brewer and
a high throw by third baseman Mc-
Namara.
The sixth inning saw California tie
the score, but the Wolverines came
back with three runs to put the game
on ice. Michigan's scores came as a
result of a walk to Peckinpaugh,
singles by Gedeon, Kremer and Pete
Lisagor, and a muff by Shortstop
Cliff Perry.
Bears Threaten In Ninth
California didn't threaten again
until the ninth. Pinch-hitter Reldon
Dunlap worked Smith for a pass and1
after Dick David fanned, the Bears'
third substitute batter, Burt Smythe
sent a sharp single to center, Dun-
lap taking third. "Bucko" got the
next man but Perry hit to Brewer in
deep short, and Don's throw to Lisa-
.gor was just too late to force Smythe,
Dunlap scoring on the play. Burt
put himself in hot water when he
fumbled Capt. Dave McNeil's ground-
er, but he forced. the heavy hitting
Duzabeau to pop to Brewer, to kill
California's hopes and winning
streak.
After the game, Coach Ray Fisher
named the following as recipients of
Varsity letter awards: Capt. Merle
Kremer, Conneaut, Ohio; Capt.-elect
Walt Peckinpaugh, East Cleveland,
Ohio; Charley Pink, Don Brewer,1
Herm Fishman, Burt Smith and For-
est Evashevski, all of Detroit; Fred
Trosko, Flint; Elmer Gedeon, Cleve-
land; Pete Lisagor, Chicago; Leo
Beebe, Garden City; Dan Smick, Ha-
zel Park; Ed Andronik, Norwalk,
Conn.; Jack Barry, Katonah, N.Y.
and Bob Campbell, Ionia.
Reserve Awards Given
Reserve awards were presented to
Earl Smith anj Russell Dobson of
A n n Arbor; Howard Greenberg,
Dayton, Ohio; Harold , Floersch,
Wyandotte; Yester Brauser, Brad-
ford, Penn.; Ralph Bittinger of De-
troit and John Heering, Port Huron,
Fishman, Brewer, Kremer, Camp-
bell and Brauser are the seniors in
addition to Smith who concluded
their careers against California. The
win gave the Wolverines a record of
13 wins in 26 games for the season.
I-M Title Softball

Game Is Postponed
The championship softball tilt that
was scheduled to be played yesterday
between Theta Xi and Phi Delta
Theta was temporarily postponed
when the I-M department discovered-
that the Theta Xi's had used gradu-
ate students in their semi-final game
with Trigon.
In order to straighten out the com-
plicated situation, Theta Xi will
again meet Trigon this afternoon
minus the services of Dick Gerkens-
meyer and Paul Simpson, the two
players who were involved in the
dispute. The winner of this fray
will then tangle with Phi Delta Theta
at the end of this week for the title.
In the other softball games played
yesterday, Delta Sigma Delta won
the professional fraternity softball
crown when it defeated Phi Delta
Phi 6-5.
Behind the four hit pitching of Ed
Thomas, Wolverine basketball star,
the Doughboys shut out the Has
Beehs in an Independent battle.

Palmer, Sophomore, Named Golf Captain For '39

A Bear Is Tamed

Nine Linksmen
A 7 f-l A "a~

.

In The Majors
HOW THEY STAND

Armstrong Overwhelms Ross

I

Michigan
Pink, of
Brewer, ss ..
Peckinpaugh,
Kremer, if.,.,

Smick, rf . .
Trosko, rf
Gedeon, lb
Lisagor, 2b
Beebe, c ...
B. Smith, p

AB R
. ... ..5 1
4 2
3b .....3 1
3 0
2 1
'.........5 1
5 0
4 1
. ... ..3 0

H
1
2
2
1
0
1
2
2
0
0

.
.

Totals ...........38 8 11

P
3
2
3
0
2
2
5
3
6
1
27
3
1
0
4
10
0
2
4
0
0
0
0

A
0
1
2
0
0
0
3
0
0
4
10
A
0
4
0
3
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0

California
Devaurs, cf

ARl
..3

Perry, ss .............4
McNiel, rf ..........4
Duzabou, 2b........5
Firpo, lb.........4
McNamara, 3b .......4
Winterbottom, if .....2
Lombardi, c .........3
Priest, p .............3
*Dunlap............0
*.David............1
*Smythe ...........1
Totals .........34
Michigan........120
California.......100

R
1
0
0
2
I
1
0
0
0
1
0
0

H
0
0
0
2
3
1
0
0
0
0

6 7 24 11
203 00x-8
301 001-6

Errors, Perry 3, McNamara 3, Du-
zabou, Firpo, Peckinpaugh, B. Smith.
Two-base hits, Firpo. Three-base
hits, McNamara
*Batted for Winterbottom in 9th.
**Batted for Lombardi in 9th.
***Batted for Priest in 9th. Triples,
Peckinpaugh. Hoe run, Duzabou.
Left on bases, Michigan 11, California
7. Struck out, by Priest 4, Smith 2.
Base on balls, by Priest 4, by B. Smith
4. Wild pitch, Smith. Umpires,
Knode and Lindsay.
Lou Gehrig Plays 2000th
Straight Baseball Game
NEW YORK, May 31.-(JP)-Iron
Hoss Lou Gehrig galloped past the 2,-
000 consecutive-game mark in the
greatest endurance record in sports
today, and the Yankees celbrated
with a lop-sided 12 to 5 victory over
Boston's staggering Red Sox.
Every regular in the Yankee line-
up hit at least once in the 16-hit at-
tack the world champions fired at
three Sox hurlers, but the player who
took the smallest active part in the
celebration was Lou himself.
Tommy Henrich hit his sixth hom-
er; Bill Dickey contributed his fifth;
Red Rolfe lined his second into the
right field stands, and Billy Knicker-
bocker belted out a triple, double and
two singles in the Yankee attack.

i-ir~e iia~e
Major Letter's
All Lettermen But Barclay,
Karpinski Will Return
To Squad Next Year
The Michigan golf team broke tra-
dition yesterday, electing a sopho-
more, Bob Palmer, '40, of Grand
Rapids to captain the Varsity next
season.
Coach Ray Courtright also an-
nounced the awarding of nine letters
to four seniors, one junior and four
sophomores-
The new captain, who succeeds Al
Karpinski, proved to be a slow starter
this year but gradually improved and
culminated his season by pacing the
Wolverine outfit in the Big Ten
championships at Minneapolis last
week.
The first day at the conference
tourne9y he put together rounds of
80 and 78 and added a 76, 77 on
Tuesday for a 313 total. This ranked
him fourth in the individual cham-
pionship behind Sid Richardson, Neil
Croonquist and Charles Evans..
Palmer Played In South
The new leader was one of ten
Wolverines who made the first an-
nual spring trip last April and.
throughout the southern swing he
played good golf but was not the
outstanding sophomore on the squad.
His record in matches throughout
the season consistently showed him
to be on the winning side taking
points in every meet that he played
in. With but a few exceptions his
medal score was in the seventies, his
lowest being a 74 against Illinois.
In the Notre Dame and Marquette
meets which just preceded the Min-
neapolis tournament he flashed three
fine rounds of 77, 76 and 75. But he
saved his best efforts of the entire
season for the all-important cham-
pionship in which Michigan finished
third.
Karpinski, Barclay Graduate
Of the letter winners, all, but Cap-
tain Al Karpinski and Bill Barclay
will return next year.
Captain Al Karpinski, Rochester,
N.Y. Captain-elect Palmer, Bill Bar-
clay, Flint, Lynn Riess, Ypsilanti,
Tom Tussing, North Tonawanda, N.
Y., Bill Black, Mansfield, 0., Bill
Yearnd, Cadillac, Fred Schwarze,
Birmingham and James Loar, Kings-
wood, W. Va. are letter winners.

AMERICAN

Cleveland. . ... .
New York .......
Washington .....
Boston.........
Detroit.........
Chicago .........
Philadelphia ....
St. Louis ........
National League

LEAGUE
W L
....24 12
......20 14
......22 18
......19 17
......18 18
.12 18
....14 20
.... ..11 23
and American

Pct.
.667
.588
.550
.528
.500
.400
.412
.324
As-

AMERICAN LEAGUE
At New York:
Boston . . . .000 050 000- 5' 5 4
New York .. 021 013 14x-12 16 1
Marcum, Oestermuller, Dickman
and Desautels; Beggs, Murphy and
Dickey.
(Only game played).
Detroit Tigers Go East;
Face Acid Test On Road
DETROIT, May 31.-(A)-Off on a
more or less perilous quest, the De-
troit Tigers. climbed onto a train to-
night for an invasion of the East
and an acid test if ever they knew
one.
Leaving Schoolboy Rowe behind.
Mickey Cochrane's outfit went forth
to battle the New York Yankees
starting tomorrow in a four game
series in Manhattan.
THE JOHN MARSHALL

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN
BOWL, New York, May 31.--
Dusky, dynamic and destructive
Henry Armstrong, greatest little
fighting man of his tir., wrote a
new chapter in ring history tonight
by giving a savage beating to Barney
Ross and capturing the world welter-
weight championship.
The sensational, negro from Los
Angeles, already holder of the world
featherweight or 126-pounds title,
achieved unprecedented fistic heights
by hurdling one class completely to
lift the 147-pound crown from the
battered head of the gallant little
Chicagoan.
Ross lasted the full 15 rounds, sur-
viving terrible punishment without
once going down, but he was so badly
beaten that the unanimous decision
in Armstrong's favor at the finish
was a mere formality and was re-

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SCHOOL
FOUNDED 1899
AN
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LAW SCHOOL
TEXT and CASE
METHOD
For Catalog, recom.
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subjects, and booklet,
"Studyof Lawand Proper
Preparation"o ddress
Edward T. Lee, Dean.

ceived in semi-silence by an estimated
crowd of 30,000 onlookers.
Only his courage and fighting in-
stinct saved Ross from a knockout:
Twice he refused the pleas of his
handlers to let them stop the fight.
Once, with only three rounds to go,
he shook his head negatively when
Referee Donovan suggested the pos-
sibility of halting the one-sided
match. But when he got to his dress-
ing room Barney promptly announced
he had fought the last fight of his
career
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