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May 29, 1938 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY N"

AY

Dou e

Feature' ToOpen

10th Repertory

Players'

Season

Windt DirectsJ
Group Of Eight
Summer Playsl
'High Tor' To Alternate
With 'Arms And The
Man' First Week
(Continued from Page 1)
John Monks, Jr., and Y ed F. Finkle-I
hoffe were once "brother rats" is the
scene of action which discloses the
more farcial side of military school
life.
"Shoemakers' Holiday" will bring
two prominent actors to the Mendel-
ssohn stages from the Mercury
Theatre production of the play. Whit-
ford Kane will play his original role
of Simon Eyre, and Hiram Sherman
will enact Firk. The play represents
Thomas Dekker on the side of facile
humor and bright dramatic realism
displaying the social unrest of every-
day Elizabethan life:
"Idiot's Delight," the 1936 Pulitzer
prize winner by Robert Sherwood, has
beeh chosen for, the fifth presenta-
,tion. Sherwood's story brings together
a song and dance vaudevillian with
his chorus of "ten dancing, prancing1
ingenues," a munitions maker, a fake
Russian heiress, a German scientist,
and a French radical.
Their weekend of frivolity in a dis-
tant Swiss chalet is sharply disturbed
when the next war bursts about them.
Their more serious political and so-
cial viewpoints are stimulated, build-
ing to a highly dramatic conflict.
The play' ends in the darkened hotel
lobby as Harry Van, the impressario,
----4f

'high.Tor,' Critics' Circle A ward Winner, To Play Again

Mr. Sherman

Tells

Story

Of

Mr. Sherman1
Young Actor To Recreate
Firk' In Shoemaker's
Holiday'
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Hiram Sherman,
who was with the Michigan Repertory
Players during the summer of 1936
and is coming back for a short engage-
ment this summer. He will portray j
his original role of Firk in the Players
version of "Shoemakers' Holiday." But
no one can tell Sherman's story but
Sherman.)
By HIRAM SHERMAN
"Shoemaker'sAHoliday" at the
Mendelssohn will be a real shoemak-
er's holiday for me. Until now, it's
been like this: nine performances a
week, a few rehearsals here, and a
conference or so there. I've only had
time to be thankful I'm working and
utter a sort of prayer that it may
continue.
Playing repertory in the Mercury
Theatre has a great advantage be-
sides allowing a diversity of parts. It
keeps me from thinking. This is a
major blessing, for an actor who has
time to think of doing something be-
sides the job at hand, often ceases to
act when it is most needed.
In my case it all started about a
dozen years ago. I made my debut
in a little theatre in . . . well, Spring-

THE PLAYS
High Tor, by Maxwell Anderson.
Arms and The Man, by George 1
Bernard Shaw.
Brother Rat, by John Monks,
Jr., and Fred F. Finklehoffe.
Shoemakers' Holiday, by Thom-
as Dekker.
Idiot's Delight, by Robert Sher-
wood.
Kind Lady, by Edward Cho-
dorov.
The White-headed Boy, by Len-
nox Robinson.
The Vagabond King, by Justin
Hartley McCarthy.
field, Illinois, to ue exact, playing
the title role in a revival of Henry
Irving's great standby, "The Bells."
I sat offstage, my lap a mass of as-
sorted jangles. I worked a baby's
rattle when the bells were far away
and worked up to a small Liberty
bell as the drama came nearer. After
that, my future assured, I was packed
off to the University of Illinois for a
higher education in the liberal arts.
Unfortunately, this excluded drama
but included military training.
I didn't fit the R.O.T.C. uniform,
and the outfitting department re-
fused to alter the garments to my
specifications.
After higher education and I had

parted company, the call of back-
stage led me to the Goodman The-'
atre, Chicago. It was an awful shock
to discover that we didn't .observe the
Christmas holidays, that we gave
extra matinees instead, that easter
vacations meant nothing but more
rehearsals, and that you didn't go
home for New Years'.
Whitford Kane, who was a fellow
member at the Goodman, was a good
angel on more than one occasion.
When he needed an assistant in his
teaching enterprises I filled the job'
And when I think of what we taught
the neophytes during the Michigan
Repertory Season, summer of 1936, I
shudder at returning to view the
results.
Finally, the Federal Theatre came
into being and I had the opportunity
of working with Orson Welles, whom
I had met whene he was in charge of
entertaining the kiddies at Marshall
Fields. Work came in "Dr. Faustus,"
on the radio, and in "The Cradle Will
Rock." Net rehearsal Mendelssohn.

11

SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe, tap acrobatics.
Garden Studio. Wuerth
2nd Floor. Open eves.

I

'I

A scene from Maxwell Anderson's modern fantasy, with Messrs. Biggs and Skimmerhorn, Van, Lise, and
steaimshovel, all present on the Tor.

I

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plays a piano accompaniment to a
nearby bombardment.
"Kind Lady," adapted by Edward
Chodorov from Hugh Walpole's fa-
mous short story, "The Silver Mask.."
is an English drawing rooi comedy-
mnystery.
It is after the wealthy kind lady
invites a beggar into her fashionable
London home, feeds him, and offers
him a. job, that the comedy reaches
its height. But when the beggar
moves in with a large family and a
host of rambling friends, the mystery
mounts to unbelievable excitement.
In the preface to "The Whitehead-I
I Boy," which follows on the Play-
ers schedule, Lennox Robinson, the
Irih playwright, has written a brief
figurative comment:
"I have conceived the idea of dis-
playing the British Empire in the
Iform of a large overgrown family,
with Ireland the youngest child."
The grand finale to the 10th Anni-
versary Season wild take place with a
full week's run of 'The Vagabond
King,' in which the Repertory Play-
ers will combine with the School of
Music.

GEO.JIMOE
SPORT SHOPS

, I

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Whitford Kane
Returns Again
For Summer
Will Direct Shoemaker's
Holiday,' Whiteheaded
Boy' For Season
Whitford Kane, one of the most
eminent character actors of the Eng-
lish and American stage, will return
to the MendelssohnTheatre this
summer as guest director of the
Michigan Repertory Players for their
10th Anniversary Season.
Mr. Kane will play in and direct
"Shoemakers' Holiday," in which he
was featured this season by the Mer-
cury Theatre, New York, and "The
Whiteheaded Boy," by Lennox Rob-
inson.
Hirai Sherman, young actor who
recently won acclaim forhis work in
the Mercury production of "Shoe-
makers' Holiday," will accompany
Mr. Kane to Ann Arbor especially for
the Players' presentation.
Remembered for his season here
in the summer of- 1936 when he di-
rected "The Pigeon" (Which John
Galsworthy wrote for him) and "Juno
and The Paycock," Mr. Kane is a
teacher as well as a director of
drama. He has taught at the Uni-
versities of New York, Iowa, Syra-
cuse, Washington besides Michigan.
Some very definite ideas about dra-
matic technique, culled from his long
experience in theatres in England
and America, are what Mr. Kane im-
parts. He believes sincerely in good,
honest emotion. "It's a lot better,"
he says, "for a young actor to overact
than to underact."
"In this sophisticated age," he
says, "actors and audience alike are
afraid of an emotional display. And
yet, the audience, without realizing
it, feels the lack."
It was from an elocution teacher,
in his native Ireland that Mr. Kane
first learned acting, and he still feels
that a course in "emoting" is what
most young actors need.

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