100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 28, 1938 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY;

SA

,.

... . ..

Student Views
Will Be Polled
HereNextYear
Student Opinion . Bureau
Will Be Patterned After
Type Set Up By Gallup
A permanent Bureau of Student
Opinion, which will conduct campus
polls several times a month, will be
established here next year, according
to James Vicary, '39, chairman of the
committee in charge of organization.
These polls, to be modeled after
those conducted on a national scale
by Dr. Gallup, will indiqate the cam-
pus view on vocational selection, po-
litical beliefs, marriage and educa-
tion. It is expected that the minfor-
mation collected will be of benefit to
the sociology, political science, psy-
chology and anthropology depart-
ments.
An executive board composed of a
statistician, a Daily reporter and stu-
dent members of various university
departments will be established to
┬▒manage the polls, Vicary said.
The results of these polls will be
compared with those conducted regu-
larly at the University of Texas and
with the Gallup polls. Both of these
measure opinion by questioning a
representative percentage of people
and using various "controls" to check
validity.
Two experimental polls have been
conducted this year, said Vicary; one
on educationrun in connection with
tle Spring Parley, and the other on
religion conducted by mail during
Christmas vacation. Statisticans
who checked over the education poll
considered it fairly accurate, he said.
DAILY OFFICIAL
f BULUU~M
(Continued from Page 4)
Mr. Sayles will preach on the theme,
"Our Goodly American Heritage."
Special guests will be the American
Legion and veterans of American
wars.
9:30 a.m. The Church School meets
under the care of Dr. Albert J. Lo-
n, superintendent.
4:30 p.m. The Junior High School
group will meet in the church par-
lors. Mrs. Herman Frinkle will qe
in charge.
6 pm. The, Senior High School
group will meet il church parlors.
Mr. Sayles will be the leader.
iloger Williams Guild: The annual
retreat for Cabinet and workers will
be held at Mr. Groome's cottage north
west point of Whitmore Lake. Con-
veyances will leave Guild house at
2 p.m. Saturday, Sunday morning at
7:30 and Sunday at 12:30. If coming,
be sure to make reservations early
Saturday morning by calling Guild
House, 7332. pr. Howard McClusky
will lead the opening conference on
Saturday evening at 8 p.m. Richard
Steding, president, will be in charge
of the Sunday forenoon conference.
Group will return Sunday night.

Dr. Arthur E. Morgan Charges-.-

Regents Accept
Plan For Durm,
$20,750InGifts
Occupancy Of Building
Is Scheduled For 1939;
8 Professors Promoted
(Continued from Page 1)
School and George Patterson of Flint
will serve a three-year term suc-
ceeding Thomas M. Hammond of
Chicago. Ira M. Smith, registrar, was
reappointed to the Board for four
years.
Prof. John S. Worley of the en-
gineering college was appointed to
the Betsy Barbour board of governors
for four years, replacing Mrs. Ches-
ter D. Barnes, of Ann Arbor, who
resigned.
Dean Clarence S. Yoakum's au-
thorization of the granting of the
degree of Doctor of Education was
approved by the Regents.
At the request of the Ordnance
Division of the U.S. Army, the Re-
gents granted a request for an Ord-
nance Training Camp to be held here
between July 13 and August 13.
There were 10 grants besides the
Pack gift.
The Cancer Research Institute do-
nated $1,800to constitute a "Radia-
tion Research Fund" which will be
used in collaboration with the physics
department.
Williard Pope of Detroit presented
$1,000 which will serve as a nucleus
for a special building fund for the
McMath-Hulbert Observatory.
Parke, Davis and Co. renewed their
$500 fellowship in pharmacy for
1938-39 and the Bauer&Black Corp.
donated $250 to continue Dr. Cyrus
Sturgis' study of adhesive tape irri-
tation.
Two gifts were accepted from the
McGregor fund. One, for, $600, will
be added to the Lake Angelus As-
tronomical Support Fund. The other,
for $300, will be set up as a special
publication fund for the McMath-
Hulbert Observatory.
The Universal Oil Products Corp.
set up a fellowship of $750 to be
known as the "Universal Oil Prod-
ucts Fellowship in Petroleum Engi-
neering."
An anonymous donation of $200
will be placed in trust for the Ped-
iatrics Laboratory Research Fund.
Another anonymous gift of $250 will
be used to set up one or more scho-
larships in the School of Music.
Alumni of the Architecture School
presented $100 as the initial donation
toward a scholarship fund.
A number of additions to the Mich-
igan Historical Collection were ac-
cepted. The American Shipbuilding
Co. of Cleveland presented the Uni-
versity with a steam turbine driven
centrifugal pump.

...Mr. Iarcourt Morgan Countercharges YCL Concludes
Year's Aetivit
Picnic Supper And Hik
t su Slated For Tomorrow
y. ... . The Michigan chapter of the You
>{;Communist League will conclude
activities for the year with a picn
supper and hike tomorrow afternoo
The group will meet at 4 p.m.
the Unitarian Church from whe
they will hike to Evergreen Lake.
program of sports, singing and d
f cussion is planned. Music from swi
to symphony will be furnished 'by
portable victrola.
The YCL, whose membership h
increased from 20 to more than
this year, has concentrated its wo
on educational activities. Weekly d
cussion meetings have been h
through the year. Recently a series
outdoor meetings has been held whe
Before taking the stand at a congressional hearing in Washington, rominent mid-western speakers ha
Harcourt Morgan (left) and David E. Lilienthal (center), TVA direc- lectured on the topic, "What is Co
tors, received some last minute advice from Senator Vie Donahey, (Dem., munism?"
Ohio), chairman of the committee. Harcourt Morgan, first to testify, A group of four classes on Mar
charged former TVA Chairman A. E. Morgan with conducting a cam- ism and Leninism conducted byJ
paign of dissent and obstruction "to discredit the TVA program." seph Clark, state head of the Leag

ke
ing
its
nic
on.
at
ere
A
is-
ng
'a
has
80
ork
is-
eld
of
ere
ave
)m-
rx-
Jo-
ue,

i

Early English Dictionary Depicts
Period Of Change, Fries Declares

Dr. Arthur E. Morgan, ousted chairman of the Tennessee Valley
Authority, leafed through his notes as he testified before a packed
Congressional committee hearing in Washington that his colleagues on
the TVA, engaged in a controversy with him, had not given an "honest
administration of a great public trust."

tI

Final Examination Schedules

College of

June 4 to June 14, 1938
Literature, Science and the Arts, Graduate School,
School of Education, School of Forestry .

Exam.
Group
Letter
A
B
C
D
E
F
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
4
P
Q
R

Time
of
Exercise

Time of Examination
Second Semester

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday.
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Special
Special
Special
Special

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Wednesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Monday,
Saturday,
Thu-sday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Friday,
Tuesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Wednesday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Saturday,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

8$
6
7
6
13
4'
9
13
7
9
10
14
10
11
8
11
14
4

9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

By LAURENCE MASCOTT
The early Modern English Diction-
ary covers a "period of changes more
fundamental than those of any later
time," according to Prof. Charles C.
Fries of the English department, who
has been at work since 1929 on the
compilation of the Eiarly Modern
English Dictionary. %
We are inclinedi to believe that the'
last century has been one of great
changes, but even a cursory exainina-
tion of the changes in the period
from 1472 to 1700 shows the tremen-
dous upheavals in all fields of human
endeavour that occurred during this
time, he continued. Moreover, these
great changes are revealed by the
fact that the total number of Eng-
lish words increased 300 per cent
during this same period.
This was the period, Professor
Fries said, of the great changes in
religion brought about by Luther
and the Protestant Reformation and
the printing of the King James ver-
sion of the Bible in 1611.
There was also, he said, a great
revolution in thought due to the dis-
coveries in science. Francis Bacon
in his "Advancement of Learning"
made popular the experimental
method in science. Galileo put for-
ward his first law of motion. Coper-
nicus set forth his theory on the Uni-
verse and this completely upset the
limited medieval motions of astro-
nomy. Kepler established his laws

of planetary motion, and Harvey dis-
covered the circulation of the blood
system. It was in this same period,
moreover, that Newton compiled his
"Principles of Mathematics" and re-
vealed the law of gravity.
The world itself, Professor Fries
continued, was opened up to the eyes
of Europe with Columbus' discovery
of America, Vasco da Gama's voyage
to India via the Cape of Good Hope
and Drake's circumnavigation.
There was, moreover, a great
awakening in the arts, he said, with
the names of Spenser, Marlowe,
Shakespeare, Jonson, Milton and
Dryden stamping themselves indelib-
ly in literature, and with the de-
velopment of new forms such as the
sonnet, blank verse, the masque, the
romantic and heroic drama, the
novel, and the newspaper.
This was also the period of the as-
cendency of Parliament over the
throne and the beginnings of the
British Empire. The defeat of the
Spanish Armada, Cromwell's "Pro-
tectorate," the Restoration and the
Bloodless Revolution all occurred in
these years. It was also during this
time that firearms came into general
use with the resulting waning of ar-
chery.
One of the greatest upheavals,
however, occurred in the daily life of
the European populace, Professor
Fries concluded. He listed the fol-
lowing as first being used or made

were sponsored by the organization.
During the year the YCL has worked
with other campus liberal groups.
An educational program is planned
by the YCL for the Summer Session
and extended work in this field will
be undertaken next year.
Local Secondary Schools
To Participate In Study
Secondary schools of Ann Arbor
will participate in a 12-year study
of the high school curriculum, ac-
cording to Otto W. Haisley, superin-
tendent of local sch2ools, who re-.
turned from Lansing recently. A for-
mal application had been made, ask-
ing Ann Arbor's inclusion in the
group of 18 cities in Michigan which
are to form this group.
Schools which take part in this
program will retain all their former
responsibilities and initiative, but will
also be aided by the state in develop-
ing instructional improvements, Mr.
Haisley said.
Sphinx To Hold Picnic
Sphinx, junior men's honor society,
will hold its annual alumni-active
picnic today. Those planning ,to at-
tend are asked to be at the side of
the Alpha Delt house at 2:30 p.m.,
with drinking glasses.
current during, this period: trousers,
silk stockings, chinaware, pocket
watches, window glass, fountain
pens, lead pencils, table forks, tooth-
brushes, coffee and chocolate houses,
tea drinking, card playing and to-
bacco-smoking.

First Congregational Church, corn-
er of State and William.
10:45 a.m., Service of worship.
"How Large is Your God?" is the
subject of Dr. Leonard A. Parr's ser-
mon. Special music will include: the
organ solo "Prelude" by Florent
Schmitt; the baritone selection sung
by Donn Chown of "Hear Me, O God"
from Mendelssohn's "St. Paul"; and
the- anthem by the choir of Parker's
"In Heavenly Love Abiding."
4:30 p.m. The Student Fellowship
will hold its last meeting of the year
at the home of Raymond Steiner,
Geddes Road. All those wishing to
go on this picnic, please meet at Pil-
grim Hall at 4:30. In case of rain
the meeting will be at 5:30 in the
church parlors.

Any deviation from the above schedule may be made only by
mutual agreement between students and instructor and with the
approval of tle Examination Schedule Committee.
' N.B. Within the past year, the time of exercise for several of the
courses listed in the Literary Announcement has been changed, but
due to an oversight no corresponding change was made in the Exam-
ination Group Letter. In order to avoid conflicts in such cases, the
time of exercise-rather thanthe Examination Group Letter-must be
employed in determining the time of examination.
Final Examination Schedules
June 4 to June 14, 1938
College of Engineering
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time
of Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the
first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be .continued through the exam-
'ination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such work
during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned exam-
ination periods must be reported for adjustment to Professor J. C.
Brier, Room 3223 East Engineering Building, before June 1: To avoid
misunderstandings and errors, each student should receive notification
from his instructor of the time and place of his appearance in each
course during the period June 4 to June 14.
No single course is permitted more than four hours of examination.

,_ . . .
__,--- _ u,- . ,
..

*1

It me s...!
Long and Loud Have Been the
Accusations Concerning the Odor
of the GARGOYLE

No date of examination may
Classification Committee.
Time of Exercise

be changed without the consent of the

First Methodist
worship at 10:40
shares will preach
War."

Church. Morning
o'clock. Dr. Bra-
on "Keep Out of

Stalker Hall. Wesleyan Guild meet-
ing. Meet at Stalker Hall at 5:30
p.m. for transportation to the Ear-
hart Estate where our meeting will
be held. This is the Annual Senior
meeting. Prof. Howard Y. McClusky
will speak on "Suggestions to Grad-
uates." Fellowship Hour and picnic
supper following the meeting.
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church.
Services of worship Sunday are: 8
a.m. Holy Communion, 9:30 a.m.
Church. School, 11 a.m. Morning
Prayer and Sermon by the Rev. Fred-
erick W. Leech, 11 a.m. Kindergarten.
Harris Hall: The program for Har-
ris Hall Sunday night will consist of
an Open House devoted to games and
recreation. We will begin at 7 o'clock,
refreshments will be served, and all
Episcopal students and their friends
are cordially invited.
Unitarian Church, 11 o'clock. Morn-
ing service, Mr. Marley will speak on

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Time
Wednesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Monday,
Saturday,
Thursday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Friday,
Tuesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
*Saturday,
*Saturday,
*Thursday,
*Saturday,
*Tuesday,
*Friday,

of Examination
June 8 8-12
June 6 2- 6
June 7 8-12
June 6 8-12
June 13 8-12
June 4 8-12
June 9 8-12

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

13
7;
9'
10
14
10
11
4
8
11
9
11
14
10

2- 6
2- 6
2- 6
2- 6
8-12
8-12
2- 6
2- 6
2- 6
8-12
8-12
2- 6
2- 6
8-12

/

/

Drawing 1; E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 2
Surv. 1, 2, 4; French
M.E. 3; Drawing 2
Met. Proc. 2, 3, 4
Economics
Spanish; Draw. 3; German
E.E. 2a; Physics 45

Next Thursday Will Appear a
Truly Fragrant Issue
Get a Slightly Tainted Copy

*This may be used as an irregular period provided there is no conflict
with the regular printed schedule above.

Charles Dolph, '39, Heads

Red Cross Chairman

I

Back to Top

© 2023 Regents of the University of Michigan