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May 19, 1938 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIC 4N DAILY

Grad Council
Draws Plans
For Next Year
Group To Be Organized
On A Permanent Basis
BeginningNext Fall
The Graduate Students' Council at
its last meeting of the year in the
Union Tuesday, drew up plans for the
permanent organization of the group
to be put into effect next fall. The
Council, representing the graduate
students in the University was or-
ganized several weeks ago on a tem-
porary basis.
An election commission named for
this fall consists of Harvey Park,
Donald Reynolds, Herbert Weisinger
Robert Schick, Robert DuBey, Stuart
Portner, Leroy Harvey, Charles Bell,
Alice Travor, Don Gootch, Emil Wed-
dige, Henry Mosby and Alfred Boern-
er. At a special convocation of all
graduate students in the fall the sys-
tem will be explained. Two weeks. lat-
er a departmental election will be held
based on proportional representation,
at which time representatives will be
chosen by the 13 major departments
of the Qraduate School and 10 smaller
departmental groups.
Sigma Rho Tau Elects
Officers For Next Year
At the last regular meeting of the
year held in the Union Tuesday night,
Sigma Rho Tau, engineering speechl
society, elected the following officers
for 'the coming year: Joseph Anton,1
'39E, chairman; Charles Probst, '39E,j
vice-chairman; J. Anderson Ash-
burn, '40E, Engineering Council rep-'
resentative; John K. Mills, '40E, treas-
urer; Earl Rrenn, '39E, corresponding
secretary; George Weisner, '41E, re-
cording secretary and Charles Forbes,
'40E, home secretary.
STROH'S CARLI NG'S
FRIAR'S ALE
-- At All Dealers
J.J. O'KANE, Dist; Dial 3500

Mrs. Barker, Once Millionaire, Now On Trial In Detroit

A1~~* ".~i

I

tuumrn awaru
77 Scholarships
For Next Year
(Continued from Page 1)
ward Maximovich, James Myers, John1
Rookus, Robert Shedd, J. Victor1
Swanson and Wesley Swift of De-
troit.
The list continues with: Frederickr
A. Earle and Selma Scheibner, Esca-
naba; David Babitch, P. June Dens-
more and William Melzow, 'Flint;
Raymond J. Green and Maydra'
Spangler, Grand Haven; Gordon H.
Girod, Cornelius Skutt and Anthony
F. Zimnowski, Grand Rapids; Rich-
ard W. Cummins, William Glasgow
and Harper H. Hull, Hillsdale: Al-
bert Eldred and Katherine Rumizek,
Ionia; Albin Schinderle, Iron Moun-
tain; Georgiene Eberly, Robert Hal-
sey and Marion Stone, Jackson; Fred
R. Cohre, Robert W. Jones and An-
thony Stampolis, Kalamazoo; Theodis
Gay and Wayne Truax, Lansing.
Other winners of awards are; Grace
E. Miller and Robert Sandberg, Mar-
quette; Susan J. Udell, Marshall;
Marian Lendved, Menominee; Martha
Cummins, Midland; Virl Marshall
and Wilma Spalding, Monroe; Mil-
dred Copeland, Mount Clemens; Dar-
Win Heine and Phillip Rice, Owosso;
Elizabeth Howard and Claude Hulet,,
Pontiac; Sarah Hauke and Thomas"
Kohler, Royal Oak; Margaret Camp-
bell and Robert Speckhard, Saginaw;
and Kenward L. Atkin, Sault Ste.
Marie.
Tan Beta Pi Elects
Spoden President
Harold T. Spoden, '39E, was elect-
ed next year's president of Tau Beta
Pi, engineering honorary society last
night at they organization's elections
meeting held at Barton Hills Country
Club.
Other officers elected were Robert
S. Young, '39E, vice-president; Don-
ald F. Van Loon, '39E, recording sec-
retary; Peter G. Ipsen, '39E, corre-
sponding secretary; George H. Han-
son, '39E, cataloguer and John G.
Young, '39E, engineering council rep-
resentative.

Aviation Group
Hears Inventor
Grover Loening To Talk
At Union Thursday
Grover Loening, internationally-
known as the inventor of the Loening
amphibian, will be the guest speaker'
at the second annual dinner of the
local student branch of the Institute
of the Aeronautical Sciences to be
held at 6:15 p.m. Thursday, May 26
at the Union. Prof. A. D. Moore of
the electrical engineering department
will preside.
Mr. Loening was recognized for his
arhievements in aviation by being
awarded the Wright trophy in 1921
and the Collier trophy in 1922. He
was chief aeronautical engineer of
the U.S. Army in 1914 and 1915 and
at present, a director of Roosevelt
Field in New York, he is engaged
in the study of transoceanic aircraft
and its possibilities.
Invitations have been sent to lead-
ing aviation officials in the U.S. Bu-
reau of Air Commerce, the profes-
sional Institute of Aeronautical Sci-
ences, Curtis-Wright Corp., American
Airlines and the aeronautical depart-
ments of Wayne and Detroit Univer-
sities, according to George M. Gold-
man, '38E, in charge of arrange-
ments.
Exhibit To Feature
Local Artists' Work
Among the exhibitors in the col-
lection of oils and watercolors to be
shown in the lobby of Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre in connection with
the Dramatic Festival are Prof. My-
ron B. Chapin, Frederic H. Aldrich,
and George A. Dietrich of the faculty
of the School of Architecture, in ad-
dition to Prof. Jean Paul Slusser
and Prof. Ernest Harrison Barnes,
also of the School of Education, who
were named in the Daily Tuesday.
Other painters whose works will be
shown are Mrs. Margaret B. Chapin,
art instructor of University High
School, Emil Weddige,.Grad., and
John Clarkson, Mina Winslow, Mrs.
Margaret Bradfield, Frank LVmng-
ston and May Brown, townspeople
and members of the Ann Arbor Art
Association.

Speech Fraternity
Hears Dorr Today
Delta Sigma Rho, national honor-
ary speech fraternity, will honor new
members at its annual banquet at
6 p.m. tomorrow in the Union. Prof.
Harold Dorr, of the political science
department, is to be the guest speak-
er, and Harry L. Shniderman, '38,
prehident of the organization, will
be the toastmaster.
The initiates are Mirian Altman,
'38; Oliver Crager, '39; Fred Greiner,
'38; Mary Francis Reek, '39; Marvin
Reider, '39; Robert V. Rosa, '39; and
Katherine Schultz, '39.

* Prv at

amd

.A"

Personal
How can a loan be really
personal and private if you
have to ask friends and rela-
~itives to co-sign or endQrbe
your note? Here you can be
sure of strict privacy in every
way. You don't have to get
co-makers. Don't hesitate to
come in even if you don't
have thekind of security re-
quired elsewhere,

* i

*'

Four months after her arrest, Mrs. Julia M. Barker, one-time millionaire real estate dealer, went to
trial in Detroit for the fatal shooting of her former business associate, Mrs. Edith Mae Cummings. Mrs.
Barker is shown leaving the courtroom where selection of a jury began today.

* f
*

Foreign Policy Club
Will Hear Lecturer

I

I

Plate Glass On

Mrs. Louise Leonard Wright, noted
lecturer and author on foreign af-
fairs, will address the Canadian-
American affiliates of the Foreign
Poli Association at its luncheon
meeting May 21, it was announced
yesterday. Reservations for the meet-;
ing can b'e made at the League.
Mrs. Wright was formerly a mem-
ber of the faculty of the University
of Minnesota and has travelled ex-
tensively: in Europe and Asia. She
is chairman of the Government and
Foreign Policy department of the
National League of Women Voters
and is associated with International
House, Chicago.'

Display Here

M

Use Of New Commercial
Products To Be Shown
A special exhibit of commercial)
flat glass products of the Libbey-
Owens-Ford Glass Company is to be
featured from 9 a.m. to 5 p.h. today
in the Architecture Building. In atalk
at 4:1'5 p.m., H. M. Alexander, com-
pany representative, will explainand
demonstrate little-known facts re-
garding, modern glass products and
their uses."
One of the newest and most in-
teresting developments in the glass
industry, according to Alexander, is
Tuf-Flex glass, unusual for its great
strength;. flexibility, and resistance
to thermal shock. Other products on.
display include plain and colored
structural glasses and* translucent
glass.

Grocers To Form
Cooperative Group
The formation of a cooperative
organization of independent retail
and wholesale grocers was undertaken
last night when 250 southeastern gro-
cers and their wives met with repre-
sentatives of the Clover Farm stores,
a national cooperative, at the Masonic
Temple.
Radical operation changes are
needed in the independent grocery
business to successfullycompete with
the corporate chain stores, Lester H.
Lipton; vice-president of the Clover
Farm Stores,. told ._the group. A
sound organization of independent
food dealers is essential, he added.
An Ann Arbor' grocery company will
serve as the supply house for the
division, Lipton said. Other divisions
in Michigan are in Cadillac and'cities
in the Upper Peninsula.
PUBLISHER DIES
KOKOMO, Ind., May 18.-P)-
John Arthur Kautz, 77, owner and
publisher of the Kokomo Tribune for
fifty-one 'years, died today in his
home. He had been ill since last
January.

Our main require.
ment is just your abil-
* ity to repay small -
regular amounts.
Unexpected demands hit
everybody at some time.
When you need cash-come
in, talk it over in a private
consultation room. You won't
* be asking us a favor-we'll
appreciate your calling.
* Personal Loans up to $300
* PERSONAL
.FINANCE CO.
10th Year in Ann Arbor
Ground Floor Wolverine Bldg.
201-203 SOUTH FOURTH AVg.
Phone 4000 R.W. Horn, Mgr.

1

C yatp ithyou..

DA
es
Co
he

ANA TO ATTEND CONFERENCE
Dean Samuel T. Dana of the for-
try school will attend the Tri-State
inference on Forest Land Use being
ld May 19 to 21 at St. Paul, Minn.

r

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

THE FOLKS AT HOME long for the sound of your voice.
Take advantage of the especially low long distance telephone
rates in effect after seven every night and all day Sundays to
talk with them now and then.
If the rate to your home. town is not shown below, refer
to page six in the telephone directory, or dial 110.

WJR
P.M.
6:00-Stevenson Sports.
6:15-Musical.
6:30-To Be Announced.
7:00-Kate Smith Hour.
8:00-Major Bowes.
9:00-American Academy In Rome.
9:30-Americans at Work.*
10:00-Just Entertainment.
10:15-Hollywood Screenscoops.
10:30-Baseball Scores.
10:35-Morceaux de, Salon.
11:00-News-Jack King.
11:15-Meditation.
11]:13(--Henry King's Orch.

CKLW
P.M.
6 :00-Wheel of Chance.
6:30--Perry Como.
6:45-Isham Jones Orch.
7 :00--Sinfonietta.
7:30-CBS Summer Theatre.
8:00-Symphony.
9:00-" Lobbies."
9:30-Henry Weber's Concert.
10:15-Dick Barrie's Orch.
10:30-Salute to the Cities.
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter.
11:15-Dance Orch.
12:00-Jan Garber's Orch.
12:30-Anson Weeks' Orch.
I :00-The Dawn Patrol.
WxYz
P.M.
6:00--Easy Aces.
6:15--Mr. Keen.
6:30-The Green Hornet.
7:00-March of Time.
7:30-Jimmy Kemper & Co.
7:45-Shefter & Brenner.
8:00-Promenade Orch.
8:30--Black Flame.
8:45-Webster Hall Orch.
9:00-Lowry Clark's Orch.
9:30-Donald Novis Sings.
9:45-Roy Shields' Encore.
10 :00-Herbert Hoover.
10:1 5-Elza SchallerteOrch.
10:30-Enrique Madriguerra Orch.
11:00-Harry Owen's Orch.
11 :30-Lew Sallee's Orch.
12 :00-Lowry Clark's Qrch..

I

it

WWJ
P.M.
6:00---Tyson's Sport Review.
C::1 0--RecordIngs.
6;15--Little Orphan Annie.
0 :30-Bradeast.
6:40-It Might Happen To You.
6:45-Sport Review.
7:00-Rudy Vallee.
8:00-Good News of 1938.
9:00-Kraft Music Hall.
10:00-Amos 'n' Andy.
10:15-Musical Moments.
13:30-House Party.
11:00--Newscast.
11:00-Northwood Inn Orch.
11:30-NBC Dance Orch.
12:00-Webster Hall Orch.

ElecticCoo0 er
Enjoy the luxury of a hot meal on your out-of-door picnics
this summer. The same meal you would serve on your dining
room table at home-a roast, two vegetables, potatoes and
gravy-tastes doubly delicious out in the #pen! Cooker
keeps food warm for hours.

$950)

On sale at hardware stores, furniture and department
stores, electric appliance dealers and all Detroit Edison of ices
[Ies For The Eleciric Cooker...No.3

THREE-MINUTE STATION-TO-STATION RATES

ANN ARBOk to:

Day
except
Sunday

Night
and
Sunday,

ALB ION
ALPENA

$ .50
1.05
.70
, 80

$ .35,
.60
.35
.40

I

I 104M - - & A,

N'

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.r----- t D AAND UTOTRIPS
COOK A COMPLETE MEAL t
BEFORE YOU LEAVE AND
CARRY IT WITH YOU I N THE
. CAR! THE INSULATED
WALLS OF THE COOER
KEEP FOOD WARM
FOR HOURS.YOU CAN
SERVE YOUR PICNIC
MEALS STEAMING HOT
AND APPETIZING.

;
iY
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t
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BAY CITY..
GRAND RAPIDS.

HILLSDALE
HOLLAND

45

.85

KALAMAZOO
LANSING
MARQUETTE
MUSKEGON

.70
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.35
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r .

1.40
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60

T HESE days offer possibilities for
good pictures at every turn.
They're easy to get with a Kodak,
but it's important to shoot with a film that's
dependable. We recommend Kodak Veri.
chrome because it has the latitude necessary
for good pictures even when the light isn't

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SAGI NAW

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... ..-

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