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May 14, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

TTIE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MAY 14, 198

Where History Is Being Made In China
Lake
HANGCHOW
i A N tN S NMIN
- yT ANG NlNGPO
SHASI . ,NG
NANCHANGO WENCHOWo
ru k* T rigrcg UN
Lake C "NGS"AYENPING FU A
Uv nJF0O CHOW
IIMOY
ar.-_
- SWA TOW
!CCA NT ON
wetRiverWL0N
OWLON. (Ba.,. - - --
. oU
Test developments in Japan's undeclared war against China are
shown on this map, including the invasion of south China for the first
time. No. 1 shows where a Japanese naval force landed at Amoy, rich
Fukien Province port; No. 2 where Chinese report Japanese repulsed
near Nanking; and similar successful drives at Mengeheng (3), Chao-
hien (4) acnd along the shores of Lake Tai (5).

War-Tume Press Was Filled
With Militaristi' Ptop1 agada
EDITOR'S NOTE: This i the third of Germany vas reported to have pre-
a series of articles on war propaganda
in the pressduring the World War. Crit- pared for the release of the "state-
icisi of specific newspapers is not in-
tended; n excerpts have been chosen at mn"b ulign esta 5
randomfor the purpose of familiariz- super-submarines, 550 smaller sub-
Ing readers with methods of propa-<
ganda. marines, 200 giant Zeppelins and 100
In the early months of 1917 most airplanes. Germany was said to be
newspapers in the United States were "prepared to serve notice to the world
of her intention to blockade the sea,
demanding action in the form of war.odetenyiondoadskthuea
meaure bythegoernentin epl ito destroy London, and sink without
measures by the government in reply warning any ships of any nation, neu-
to-the German submarine campaign. tral or otherwise, bound for any port
The editorial tone of the entire press that has even the slightest connection
took on a militaristic and patriotic with the Allied nations."
'character.
The Michigan Daily did little overt
More subtle forms of propaganda propagandizing for militarism, al-
than .editorial pleas for action were though a fully colored flag two col-
contained in nearly all newspapers. umns wide appeared on the front
The New York Times and other papers page on Washington's Birthday, 1917
carried frequent rotogravure pictures Editorials of that time were devoted
of ;cenes in American-conducted to' local campus matters. On March
French wars hospitals, romanticizing 31, however, following approval by
the wQunded soldiers. In one typical the Board of Regents of a system
picture, the soldier was shown com- of voluntary military training for the
fortably reclining beneath a flowered campus on the grounds that facilities
bedspread while one nurse read the for the compulsory training which a
newspaper to him and another played majority of the students had voted
the piano. Another Times rotograv- for in a campus poll ,the lead para-
ure picture showed a group of women grph in th dtralclm e
atpropriately dressed pointingrifle marked, "We have only two things to
at a target. The caption read, "Young be sorry for this morning; first, that
Society Women of the Pinehurst Col- we can't have compulsory training;
any Organize a Preparedness, Gun second, that the necessary steps have
Club." A similar picture in a Sun- not been taken so that Michigan may
day section of the Free Press showed immediately reenter the Western
"Boston Girls Learning How to Shoot Conference."
Straight." In the same Sunday issue
a magazine section carried a serial
story entitled, "Winning His Way to Friday, I3th, BidhProves
West Point.)!
Outright falsification appeared it
a story written originally for the.Chi-
cago American and quoted by several ATLANTA, May 13.-(R)--Bidding
other papers. Appearing Jan. 3, it on Friday 13th for a contract for
stated, "In the office of the German work on the Thirteenth Street Bridge
Ambassador in Washington, there is, over the Savannah River in Augusta,
accoding to our information, a state- Wannamaker and Wells, Inc., of Or-
mient of Gernany's defiance to the angeburg, S.C., submitted the figure
world,. a statement of her intentions $113,113.13.
and plans. The statement is ready The bid failed to win the contract.
for release, perhaps within 48 hours." It was about $13,000 above the lowest
- figure.
DitreetorANN ARBOR CONTRACT
LANSINGMay 13.-(A )-The State
Conservation Commission today au-
thorized the employment of the Ann
light feather case. Reward. Call Arbor Hydraulic Engineering Firm of
Nancy Schaefer, 3458. Shoecraft. Drury and McNamee to
assist in the state's attempt to pre-
LOST: Pair of horn-rimmed glasses vent diversion of waters from the
in leather case. Call 3143. 525 Bond and Agate Falls.
FEATURE STARTS 2:00 - 4:00 - 7:15 - 9:30 P.M.
MATINEES 25c
EVENINGS 35c

Worley To Attend
Detroit Safety Meet
Prof. John A. Worley of the en-
gineering college and Prosecutor Al-
bert J. Rapp will be on the panel of
the Michigan state-wide safety con-
ference to be held Monday through
Wednesday, May 23 to 25 in Detroit.
Prof. Roger L. Morrison also of
the engineering college is a member
of the board in charge of the con-
ference.
Professor Worley will discuss "The
Transportation Engineer Looks at
Highway Safety," explaining compar-
ative training methods for safety in
all branches of transportation and
their application to traffic problems,
at 2 p.m. Monday.
Mr. Rapp will speak on 'The Prose-
cution of Traffic Cases,' at the sec-
tion on traffic enforcement, at 9 a.m.
on Tuesday.
EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
WJR
P.M.
6:00-Stevenson Sports.
6:15-Musical.
6 :30=-Melody and Rhy thm.
7:00-News Comes To Life.
7:30-Philip Morris.
8:00-Professor quiz.
8:3--Saturday ight Srenade.
9:00-Your Hit Parade.
9:45-Musical.
10:00-Will Osbornes Orh.
10:30-Baseball Scores.
10:35-Benny Goodman's Orch.
l:00-News-JTack King.'
11:15-Art Kassel's Orch.
11:30-Nat Brandwynnes Orch.
W WJ
P.M.
6:00-Tyson's Sports Review.
6:10 Sophisto-Kats
6:30-Newscast.
6:40-It Might Happen to You.
6:4-Sport Review.
700-"Swingology.
7 :30-LaCongo Orch.
745-Studio Feature.
8:00-Concert- in Rhytuii.
8:30-Aaerican Portraits.
9:00-NBC Symphony Orch.
9:30-Al Roth
10:30-Organist.
10:45-Dance Music.
11:30-Hotel Stater Orch.
12:00-Webster Hall Orch.
CKLW
P.M.
6:00-Wheel of Chance.
6:30-Xavier Cugat's Orch.
6:45--Jack white's Sportscast.
7:00-Studies in Contrast.
7:30-What Do You Know?
8:00-Drums.
8:30-Baxnstormers.
9:00-Renfro' Barn Dance.
9:30-Bunny Berigans Orch.
10:00-Ennio Bolognini's Orch.
10:15-Dance Orch.
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter.
11:15-Ishara Jones' Orch.
11 :30-Bob Crosby's Oreb.
12:00-Anson Weeks' Orh.
12:30-Jan Garber's Orch.
1:00-The Dawn Patrol.
WXYZ
PM
6:00--Sandiotters
6:15-Special Delivery.
630-Uncle Jim's Questiou Uce.
7:00-Town Talk.
7:15-Melody Serenade.
7:30-TO BeAnnounced.
8:00-Barn Dance.
9:00--Design for Music.
9:30-Dick Gasparre Orh,.
10:00-To Be Announced.
10:30-Horace Heidt Orch.
11 :30-Herie Kay's Orch.
12 :00-Graystone Orch.
YOU-
may be the one with the ability
and amount of cash needed to
take over a good first class Col-
lege Supply Store located across
from Ohio State Campus. What
we are after is a good, dependa-
ble.business manager with ar
cash interest in same.
STUDENT SUPPLY
1872 N. High St., Columbus, o.
Read Daily Classified Ads

Fur Workers Orderly Strike Is Lauded

Prof. Rowe Seeks
Play By Student
For Drama Season
"At least one student written play
should be presented in the annual
Dramatic Season," Prof. Kenneth " I.
Rowe of the English department'said
in a recent interview.
Professor Rowe advised this ar-
rangement if playwriting classes
turned up a student play which was
worthy of production and had been
presented by Play Production to work
out the weaker spots and prepare
it for production. He cited as an ex-
ample of such a play, Norman Ros-
ten's "This Proud Pilgrimage," which
was presented in January.
"In this way, the student's work
would be given due credit and a pro-
fessional cast would be able to pick
out its good parts, on which possible
improvements might be made and also
work out various problems of produc-
tion, he stated.
Miss Helen Arthur, executive direc-
tor of the Season, suprorted Profes-
sor Rowe's suggestion and said that
she would be extrc mely happy to pre-
sent a student play if it were possible
within the limits of time and pro-
duction.
She stated that young artL:.. ' work
should be encouraged, and that this
would be an excellent way of doing it.
She also advised that drama students
should be permitted to attend'the re-
hearsals of the Dramatic Season art-
ists if it were agreeabie with members
of the cast. "This," she said, "would
give them first hand contact with the
professional theatre and prepare them
for future work."
Read The Daily Classifieds

A passive strike conducted by these 4,000 fur workers in New York
City won them compliments for their orderliness, which contrasted with
strike violence elsewhere. Massed on West 29th St. between 7th and 8th
Avenues the pickets, now in the fifth week of strike, are daily exhorted
by their leaders to remain steadfast and praised for their restraint.

Drama Head To Speak
Over WWJ Tomorrow
Miss Helen Arthur, executive direc-
tor of the 1938 Dramatic Season, will
speak over radio station, WWJ, De-
troit, at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow.
Miss Arthur will speak on "A Wes-
tern Outpost of the Drama," comply-
ing with the request of Winn Wright,
manager of WWJ, who asked Miss
Arthur to give an informal discus-
sion similar to the lecture she de-
livers each year at the Yale School

1938 DR AMATIC SEASON
May 16 thiough June 18
Beginning Monday Evening, May 16 at 8:30
ALINE t:M-c MAHON"&
in
"THE GHOST OF YANKEE DOODLE"
by SIDNEY HOWARD
Orch. $1.50, $1.0;Balc: $1.10, 75c
Matinees: Wed. and Sat.-Orch. 75c, Bale. 50c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box Office Tel. 6300

- -

- { _.

r

IN4 THE RIN14G
IT'S; PUNCH
T HAT COUNTS

F

I

'I

"ITS A WOW!"
-Varicty Daily____

. .and The Michigan Daily Classified Section also gives
you that powerful punch!!

It's that punch that has caused people for years

to

depend on The Daily
student-hody.

as their medinm for reaching

the

Classified Advertising has a definite function and pre-
sents a clearly defined service to the people who read it and
to those who use it.
It is invaluable in recovering lost articles, or finiding the
owners of lost articles. If you have something of value in
the way of a service or a commodity, use our Classified Col.
umns. Rooms for rent; instruction in music, dancing, or
violin; typing; and a great host of personal services - all
coic under the head of Classified Advertising.
CALL 23-24-1 for Quick Results at Reasonable Rates.

EDWARD G.t
mtoinSon
-in
Ax SLGHT CAS
rkFN AIis hW

IIll IjLUnlUWT. 1. L,:V -NI /I i t !4

II

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