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May 13, 1938 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG AN DAILY

I

Geogaphy Men
NoW Camp In
NorthMichigan
Summer Sessioners Will
Take Over Old CCC
Site Near Straits
With the first bit of consistent
warm weather, many geography stu-
dents are beginning to look forward
to a summer to be spent at a camp
on the cool straits of Mackinac,
where they will spend their summer
time chalking up credit hours, swim-
ming, horseshoe-pitching, and play-
ing baseball, cribbage and bridge.
Geographers this year contemplate
a session at a new geography camp,
presented to- the University last
spring at the site of a former CCC
camp. This new camp contains sev-
eral large buldings, dining and cook-
ing facilities, lights, water and good
roads.
Former Camps
The former geography camps
boasted of no such pretentiousness
and the new quarters are luxurious in
comparison, members of the geogra-
phy department state. The first
camp was situated on the Cumber-
land River in southern Kentucky
among "'baccy chawin' hillbillies"
and stern-wheel steamboats. After
five years the former sawmill was
fihally washed away by the river.
However, new and sturdier quar-
ters were built above the reaches of
the river and for 11 years field
courses operated from this station.
In the end the danger of snakes and
typhoid, and the severe summers
drove even the sturdy-hearted geog-
raphers back to Michigan.
Near Menominee
The second site was in the Upper
Peninsula near Menominee. This
camp obtains its claim to fame be-
cause of the fact that for the first
time women students were admitted,
despite an almost complete lack of
facilities. Despite the pleasant lo-
cation the growing camp was forced
in 1937 to seek new quarters and the
CCC camp offered a perfect haven.
So this summer amateur geogra-
phers will map sections for soil cover,
gather land ownership data, map
trout streams, or make long inspec-
tion jaunts working in their new pre-
tentious quarters at Mackinac, re-
calling with gratitude the pioneer
geographers who sweated among the
Courses To Bfe
Of Two Types
Education School To Have
Four Weeks Program
During the Summer Session of 1938
the School of Education will offer two
types of courses, one providing for'
class meetings five times a week for
six weeks, the other for four classes
a week for eight weeks.
Work will be offered in seven de-
partments of instruction, providing
for a great variety of teaching in-
terests. Opportunities will be fur-
nished for individual student con-
ferences with instructors, assembly
meetings, observation of teaching in
the elementary grades, general lec-
tures, and recreational activities of
many kinds.
Practice teaching will be conducted
during the Summer Session in the
University Elementary School. Ob-
servation and directed teaching will

be carried on with six groups of chil-
dren five mornings a week for six
weeks. A clinic in Secondary Edu-
cation will also be offered during
the Summer Session. This will study
individually pupils having difficulties
in reading or mathematics.

The U niversity Hospital shown above, which was built in 1925, draws patients from all over the United
States. Its well equipped rooms will hold about 1400 patients. Other units are located throughout Ann
Arbor.

Sum er Terms
List' Research
1.n,- F-0-44. Study
Fouar?'rofessors To :jive
Lectures (Jat c exnical
Nature Of Proteins
A special program in the study of
the 'chemistry ' of proteins bringing
visiting lecturers to Ann Arbor will
be given as part of the University
Summer- Session this year.
Dr. Max Bergmann ,of the Rocke-
foller Institute for Medical Research,
Dr., -R. K. Cannan of New York Uni-
versity,-Dr. William C.,Rose of the
University ofIllinois, and Dr: Vin-
cent duVigneaud of George Wash-
ington University will be the guest
lecturers, each giving four lectures
on' some phase' of research in the
chemistry and metabolistic import-
ance of proteins.
The subjects will cover the fields
of electrochemistry and nutritive im-
pbrtance of amino acids and proteins,
protein metabolism and the chemis
try of proteolytc enzymes. These lec-
tures are to be supplemented by reg-
ular laboratory and lecture work in
the department.
Professor Cannan will give the first
of the series of lectures, discussing
the "Electrochemistry of th'e' Amino
Acids and Proteins." Dr. Bergmann
will lecture on "The Newer Chemistry
of the Proteins. and Proteolytic En-
zymes," during the second week, while
Professor Rose will talk on the subject
of- "The Nutritive Significance of the
Amino Acids," during the third week.
Professor duVigneaud will, discuss
homocystine in the concluding series.
Besides the special work this' sum.-
mer, regular courses will be offered in
the department for students wishing
advanced or regular credit in any
of several departments in the med-
ical field. These will include labora-
tory and quiz programs and special
programs in research for advanced
students. Prof. Howard B. Lewis of
the department of biological chemis-
try is in charge of the work.
University's Museum I
One Of World's Finest
In a great building especially con-
structed in 1928 for service as a mu-
seum, the University of Michigan
houses collections in zoology, botany,
paleontology and anthropology which
experts describe as "marvelously com-
plete."
Also included in the University
plant are special museums and teach-
ing collections illustrative of natura:
history, the industrial arts, chemis-
try, materia medica, anatomy, arch-
aeologY, ethnojogY, fine arts and
history. Research facilities for .gradu-
ate students are provided.
t

r, _ .

For a Happy Summer Season
Visit our Sho pees often
GROOM-WELL BA-R-BERS
AND BEAUTY SHOPPES

015 East Liberty - 3773

1205 South University - 4818

11

U .
Student Supplies Oflice Equipment
,t DE S,
"Rent a Typewriter" "gent a Typewriter"
302 South State Street
,F'oantain Pens T y, iewf"it rs
r r F r tse ,
1 F C6,11e4tans
" THE SUBWAY has proven to be one of the most popular I
restaurants' on the campus. Here in a cool, refreshing atmos-
phere you may dine and dance to your heart's desire. We, invite
you to join the crowd of wisecollegians who daily visit the
Subway.

Practical Laboratory~
Facilities Are Available..
Educators declare that instruction
in the laboratory sciences should be
"practical." In answer to that de-
mand, the University of Michigan
provides its students with special lab-
oratories in physics, chemistry, min-
eralogy, geology, physiological-chein-
istry, forestry, psychology, botany,

akesA ndHillsF
orSummerT

Provide Facilities

Students'

Recreation

zoology, pathology, bacteriology, ana-,
tomy and physiology.
Also available is a well-equipped
statistical laboratory especially de-
signed for students of insurance. In
the College of Engineering labora-
tories and shops provide students
with experience in the fields of 'dy-
namo electricity, woodwork, lathe
work, forging, foundry world and in-
strument making.
Read The Dail Cl assi f ieds

The 'University Fathers who saw
fit to permit the partial use of auto-
mobiles 'for sport during the summer
session paved the way for the enjoy-
ment of some of the finest recrea-
tional areas in this part of the coun-
try.
Of these areas, the one most fre-
quently mentioned is Whitmore Lake,
12 miles north of Ann Arbor on U.S.
Highway 23, a center for boating and
swimming. Overnight accommoda-
tions and several stores where for-
gotten but essential _ camping equip-
ment may be secured round out its
qualifications as a recreational spot.
Swimmers and boaters also find
Portage Lake, five miles beyond Dex-
ter, an excellent center for summer
operations. Two hard surfaced Boun-
ty roads 'increase the _availability and
desirability of its facilities. One route,
along the banks of the Huron, furl
nishes recreation in itself with its
wooded scenery and picturesque
curves.
For those who are looking for a
location for an all day picnic, Irish
Hills on U.S Highway M lust west of
Clinton has all that one could de-
sire. In addition to a State Park,
Plan, Summer
SchoolConcerts
Weekly Prograxzt, Flay:
Will Be Presc ii-ted
A series of -plays and weekly con-
certs will be given as part of the out-
side program being sponsored this
summer by the Summer Session for
its members, it was announced yes-
terday.
The plays will be held throughout
the eight weeks of the Session, of-
fered by the Repertory Players under
the auspices of the Department of
Speech and General Linguistics. Val-
entme B. Windt will be director.
Concerts will be given every Sun-
day, Tuesday and Thursday. Sunday
programs will consist of vesper se. ,,v-
ices and carillon concerts.

numerous private companies have
supplied the district with facilities for
amusement. From towering lookout
points, one is able to see Southern
Michigan's roughest and hilliest coun-
try.
Dexter-Huron Park on the Huron
River Drive has beenhailed by pro-
fessional outdoor recreational leaders
as an ideal small development for
the accommodation of urban resi-
dents. Substantial tables are pro-
vided and an efficient garbage dis-
posal system is maintained to make
picnicking more enjoyable. Its site
in a wooded grove on a bend in the
Huron makes it extremely .logical
for either outings or just twilight
drives.
Those students who do not own
automobiles will find several areas
accessible for hikes or bicycle excur-
sions. Cascade Glen, a mile out on
the Huron Drive finds much use
for small occasions. Although it of-
fers only limited facilities and space,
its natural beauty makes it a pop-

ular spot. Also situated on a bend
in the Huron River, its main attrac-
tion is its rough topography and
varied forest cover.
Saginaw Forest, an SO-acre tract of
woods owned by the University and
operated as an experimental forest
by the School of Forestry and Con-
servation is available for persons who
are interested only in beauty.. The
forestry school prohibits any sort
of recreational use, but for wild land
scenery it is unequalled in this dis-
trict.
Sport lovers will find plenty of op-
portunity to enjoy themselves in the
facilities provided in and around Ann
Arbor. Three golf courses in the
city and several others in adjoining
districts furnish - adequate space for
lovers of that game.
Tennis fans are adequately provid-
ed for by both city and University
courts. Palmer Field for women 'and
Ferry Field for men are the major
University locations while Burns Park
is the City's contribution.

DANCING 2-5 --r $-11 Fv1VI.

Jahn Abraham, Manag

The Subway,

Under Miller's
Drug Store.,
f

e i,'._-_

I

f ,.___ __ ___ ____ _ _._ ._.____ _ _ ____
, . f
,:
,,

tra
X v
tra.,
Y
X-1
,
JULIAN FANL
Special Pahn 'Beach,
Representative
here todo' ...

.

I -

COME ONCE AND YOU'LL COME AGAIN

w
a ' '
"

Everybody. knows that genuine Palm Beach Suits are
cool , . but what they'll do for your, good appearance .. .
is a surprise we're saving for you.
OUR NEW
PAU" .8 EAC H S U I TS
are Summer Fashion News. Clever but conservative
Sportbacks in distinctive glens and checks . . . striped
dark-toned business suits in single and double breasted
lounge models ... Feather weight whites in Solar weave
for play days and the comfortable drape formal
in the. famous Palm Beach. Tux. They're all here in
the wisest selection we've ever assembled.

\

D
I
N
N
E
R

45c
50c
65c

After you've eaten only once
at the Parrot, you'll want to
come again. It's food is not
only the best and cooked in the
most delicious manner, but the
price is right. For breakfast,
lunch or dinner, you can't go
wrong at The' Parrot, conven-
iently located on the edge of
campus at the end of the diag-
onal.

0c L
u
5c H
c
45c H

WHILE ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY THIS 5UM MER
nav-e pu&
klavc ym r clothes TAIIr.C RED by TINKER front a varied
and unusually fine selection of choice fabrics. A suit by
TINKER combines the style you want, the cloth you
desire, the color you wish, with a price you can afford to pay.

$17.75

DINNER FORMALS.
SMART SLACKS. . . .

$20.00
$5.50

$35-00

to $65:00

Forty-five years' experience in "Tailoring garments for
University Men and their friends is a guarantee of absolute

WILA X-J" r^rv%^=nW

I 1

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