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May 08, 1938 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-08

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T H E MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MAY

8, 1938

THE

WORLD

OF

BOOKS

MARPilGE: The Late Bishop Fisher
Discusses Its Problems ...

PEATTIE

ensuality. Bishop Fisher defends it. Biography Of A Grove
But again he assumes a newly wedd- Of Trees Is H is
ad pair motivated in all their ac-L
tions by and spiritual values the long
view. A PR AIR I E GROVE by Donald Cul-
I think he is correct, however, in ross Peattie,. ixmon and Schuster,
tis refusal to admit that sexual a- - Inc., New York (1933), $2.50
justment is as all-important in mar- By ErTHEL NORBERG
riage success as many author in the An island of trees in the middle of
Last two decades have made it. As a prairie is the unique subject of
he says, informed persons who love Donald Cuiross Peattie's latest book,
one another deeply will rarely find A Prairie Grove. This is not a history
insurmountable obstacles to sex ad- APareGoe hsi o itr
justment. or a novel, according to the author,
but a simple story of a grove of trees
Two points remain. Bishop Fisher in Illinois from its early beginnings
seems to exaggerate the degree to down to the present. Every chapter
which differences between men and in this story of the grove is touched
women are constitutional. This, with a spirit of pantheism that only
however, is relatively unimportant be- the naturalist, the nature lover that
cause the cultural factors which en- Mr. Peattie is, can recreate in words.
ter so largely here are so fundamen- The birds, the bees, the trees and
tal as to make important change un- flowers are sketched in a reverent
likely at least for another generation. manner. There is something reminis-
Much more serious, it seems to me, cent of Wordsworth about the book.

League Committee
Members Listed
(Continued from Page 5)
mittee, which is headed by Janet Ful-
lenwider, '39, are: Florence Broth-
erton, '40, Bunty Bain, '39, Helen
Roberta Brown, '41, Eile -n Boorsma,
'39, Elizabeth Clark, '41, Janet Clark,
'40, Rthl Davis. '41, Zelda Davis, '40.
Mary Elizabeth Easterly, '39, Jane
Everest, '?9, Margaret Ford, '40, Enora
Ferriss, '40, Jeanne Grant, '40, Eliza-
beth Gross, '40, Virginia Lee Hardy,
'41, Ruth J. Hartmann, '39, Frances
Hubbs, '40, Susan Kerr, '40, Harriet
Levy, '40, Virginia List, '41.
Other Members Named
Joan Lynch, '39, Mary Margaret
Meloche, '40, Jeanne Morgan, '40,
Nina McLellan, '41, Helen New, '41,
Richarda Newberg, '41, Bethe O'Roke,
'40, Peggy Pulte, '39, Ellen F. Rhea,

41, Mary A." Rodger, '41, Mary Eliza-
beth Rouse, '41, Jean Alice Ruther-
ford, '40, Zenovia Skoratko, '40, Har-
riet. Sharkey, '40, Ella Stowe, '40,
Elizabeth Sutton, '40, Marjorie Tate,
'39, Harriet Thom, '40, Ann D. Wills,
'40, Madelaine L. Westendorf, '40 and
Mary McClure, '39.
. - tublicity Committee
rhe following women are named to
the publicity committee, which is
headed by Harriet Pomeroy, '39, Ei-
leen Boorsma, '40, Helen Brown, '41,
Elizabeth Clark, '41, Ellen Cuthbert,
'39, Gwen Dunlop, '40, Virginia Ann
Durand, '40, Jane Elspass, '40, Dor-
othy Keene, '41, Una Kelley, Ellen
Krieghoff, '40. Carolyn Leahy, 41
and Doris Nashold, '41.
Others are Carolyn Ross, '39, El
' inor Sevison, '41, Leona Siff, '40,
Jean Smith, '40, Barbara Telling, '40,
Margaret Walsh, '41 and Margaret
Whittemore, '41.
Candy Booth Committee
The candy booth committee, under

Madeline Krieghoff, '39, vice-presi-
dent of the League are: Barbara
Benedict, '40, Mary Leigh Burleson,
'40, Jane Elspass, '40, Dorothy Glass,
'40, Ellen Krieghoff, '40, Harriet Levy,
'40, Mary Loughborough, '39, Marie
McElroy, '39, Virginia Mulholland,
'39, Richarda Newberg, '41, Marian
Price, '40, Mary Alcott Rodger, '40,
Suzanne Stevenson, '40, Alice Ward,
'41 and Ann Wills, '41.
The ballroom committee, headed
by Betty Spangler, '39, vice-president
of the League, is as follows: Jane
Campbell, '39, Janet Homer, '41, Lu-
cille Kauer, '40, Dorothy Shipman,
'40, Mary Wheat, '39, Margaret
Whitemore, '41 and. Barbara Zapp,
'40.
Headed by Grace Wilson, '39SM,
vice-president of the League, the
dancing class members are Edith Le-
veene, '41 and Barbara Zapp, '40.

i

is his failure to devote any atten-
tion to the role of children in "how
to stay married." This is doubly
mystifying because of his deep fam-
ily feeling and emphasis on the home.
Figures unquestionably confirm what
most of those who have children feel,
that youngsters are a great factor,
perhaps the greatest factor, in last-
ing 'marriage.
FRA Aide Writes
Louise V. Armstrong, Federal Relief
Administrator in a small Michigan
town, has written the story of her
experiences in a book entitled We
Too Are The People, to be published
June 3.
Its publishers compare it in tech-
nique to Carl Carmer's Stars Fell on
Alabama and Dr. Cronin's The Stars
Loak Down.
Lupe Buys Books
Some years ago Lupe Velez, busy,
furnishing her new Hollywood home,
noticed an empty bookcase in one of
the various living rooms. Promptly
ringing a bookstore she informed the
clerk she wanted to buy some books.
"Rush them right over," ordered
ILupe. "And send a lot-about five
yards!"
H. W. CLARK
ENGLISH BOOTMAKER
Custom-Made Boots to Your Measure
Riding Boot, hand-sewn Welt, hand-
lasted, from $6.75 up. All kinds of
oxfords made to measure from $7.50 up.
534 Forest Ave. Ann Arbor, Mich.

Ferocious beasts first roamed in
this square mile of trees surrounded
by prairie. Later came the Indians
with their strange tribal ceremonies,
their witchcraft. They were still en-
camped in the grove when the first
French explorers arrived bringing
with them their Christian God. Fol-
lowing these trail blazers were the
farmers, the tillers of the soil. Among
them was the Goodner family, a fam-
ily of true pioneers embodied with
the American spirit. They were the
first who plowed up the plains and
planted the golden wheat which be-
came so important in the lives of all
the settlers.
Mr. Peattie tells us that there is a
real prairie grove. In speaking of his
book he says, "For of course there is
a real Grove. and as I say, I walk in it.
I did my courting in it, and married
into it, and my children have it in
their blood and call it home. So, in
a way, I am a part of its biota, of
which this book is a study.
"Yet it is just as true' that there is
no one particular spot that you - or.
I - could call the locale of A Prairie
Grove. So that the two groves - the
island a drift in my thoughts and the
real havcn of trees and fields caught
in the net of highways, - are no more
identical than the real Mars and the
planet we mean when we think of
Martians who may dwell on it. I hold
to nothing literally, and will not be
held, except to the burr oaks and the
grass, the pigeons and the elk. For
them I am remembering."
Those who have read Mr. Peattie's
recent work, Green Laurels, will cer-
tainly look forward to reading this
book, and those who have not, have
something in store for them.

WIND OVER WISCONSIN.. . August Derleth 2.50
THE DARK ROSE . . . Walsh.... .... 2.50
HEAVEN CAME SO NEAR. .. Hubert Skidmore 2.50
ACTION AT AQUILA. . . Hervey Allen . . 2.50
BOUNTY OF EARTH ... Donald Peattie 1.00
THE PRODIGAL PARENTS ... Sinclair Lewis . 2.50
THE SUMMING UP ... W. Somerset Maugham 2.50
LIKE WATER FLOWING.. . Margaret Mackay 2.50
PROMENADE ... G. B. Lancaster. 2.50
WAHRS BOOKSTORES
State Street Main Street

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