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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1938 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICIIIG AN DAILY S

MA Y '7

ailway Labor
pct Hailed As,
1ndustrial Boon
iarfinan Tells Teachers
ldeasure Will Avert Wage
1ut Crisis
(Continued from Page t)
her than satisfactory and correct
lements.
)uring the morning session Prof.
>rge W. Taylor of the University
Pennsylvania spoke on collective'
goining as an economic weapon.
open discussion with Professor
lor followed the talk and com-
ed the morning program.
.fter Professor Sharfman's address
the afternoon Chairman R. W.
ne of the University of Chicago
cucted a round-table discussion on
aims of industrial relations and
he evening Prof. Selig Perlman of
University of Wisconsin spoke
policy questions within the labor
vement today.
'oday's program includes a morn-
address, by Thomas G. Spates of
General Foods Corporation and
eport on a study of worker's atti-
es and condIuct by W. J. Dickson
the Western Electric Company.
f. William Haber of the University
conclude the day's conference
a a lecture on "Social Security-
ae Current Problems."
omorrow the conference will close
r a morning session which will
ude an address on the National
or Relations Act, and a talk by
ert E. Meder of Beaumont, Smith
i Harris, Detroit.
;rna Rho Tau To Hold
National Meeting Today
'he national convention of SigmaI
> Tau, engineering speech society,I
be held today in Detroit.
.n important feature of the con-
tion will be the speech contests to
held this afternoon. University
resentatives are Charles Forbes,
rge Weisner, Henry Billings,
na. Rocca, James Brodkorb, and
ry Fischer.. ,
ean Palmer of the University of
edo will preside at the business
tings, and at the banquet in the
nling Mr. Lewis D. Goddard, Mich-
- alumnus and former managing
;or of the Technic, will be among
speakers.

Italian Farmhands Rush Into Germany

"Help Wanted" by German farms got a response from several thou-
sand Italian farmhands, who hurried into the Hitler kingdom to find
jobs in agricultural districts. Arrival in Germany was a festive occa-
sion for these Italians.
IFDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETINEv
Publicatl n in the Butetin Is conmtructivP notice to all members of the
SUaversity. Copy received at the offiee of the Assistant to the President
untlil3e:30 11 :00 a-mon-Saturday

Historical Papers
Donated To Lihrary
A collecv.0on of the paiers of John
J Bagley, 0,*overnor of Michigan from
1873 to 1877, has been received re-
cently by the Michigan Historical
Room of the Wililam Clements Li-
brary from Mrs. John M. Bagley of
Detroit, the governor's daughter-in-
law.
The papers deal largely with po-
litical matters in the state from the
years 1864 to 1881.
The papers of C. D. Randall, state
senator in 1871 and 1872 were re-
ceived by the Library from his daugh-
ter, Miss Mabel Randall. Most of
them are letters that he received from
Governor Bagley concerning the State
School for Dependent Chil/dren at
Coldwater which Mr. Randall helped
establish,
Tradi tionw 1Tale
Of Tap pan Oak
Is Told Herein,
By RICHARD HAR MEL
Modei Universities and their stu-
dents have presented an almost unit-
ed front against continuing old tra-
ditions and knowing the significance
of rocks, statuary and other memor-
ials that classes 'throughout the dec-
ades have given.
One of the age-old customs of Mich-
igan seniors in each college was to
present a gift to the University. There
are significant memorials on campus,
many of which bear interesting stor-
ies.
Tappan Oak is the most venerable
of all memorials. The Class of 1858,
upon perceiving the majesty of the
tree standing on the lawn south of
the present library, determined to
call it Tappan Oak, and placed a
boulder near its foot with this in-
scription:,
"In honor of Dr. Henry P.
Tappan then president of the
University of Michigan, the Class
of 1858 named this tree the Tap-
pan Oak; placed this boulder at
the' foot and planted 48 trees in
circles around the )ak, each
member of the class planting a
tree."
Thus, 48 maple trees were solemnly
planted in concentric circles around
the oak. Unfortunately with the
building of the Main Library, many
were destroyed while others livec'
their natural lives and died

Who Are His Parents?

If.

(Continued from Page 4) -
Cox; lPostlude, Taccata" by Widor.
4:15 p.m., Vesper Service and Or-
gan Dedication. Dr. Joseph A. Vance
of Detroit, former Chairman of the
University of Michigan Presbyterian
Porporation, will preach on the topic
"The Conquering Church." The stt-
dent choir and the junior choir will
participate ini the service. The mu-
sical program will include the, follow-
ing numbers: ,Organ Prelude, "Ich
steb'mit einem Fuss im Grabe" by
Bach; Anthem, "Sanctus"'bby Gounod,
Arthur .Hackett, Soloist;' Anthem;;
"Benedictus" by Gounod; Organ Post-'
lude, "Thou art the Rock" by Mulet.
6:30 p.m. Westminster Guild Re-
ception for Ann Arbor student.Guilds,
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church.
Services of worship Sunday are: 8:00
a.m. Holy Communion; 9:30 a.m.,
Church School, 11:00 a.m. Kinder-

garten, 11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer
and Sermon by The Right Reverend
John N. McCormick, D.D., Bishop of
Western Michigan.
Trinity Lutheran Church Services.
The Morning 'Service will. be held in
Trinity Lutheran Church at 10:30
with sermon by the pastor Henry 0.
Yoder on "There is a Way of Peace."
The Lutheran Student Club will
meet as usual in Zion Lutheran Par-
ish Hall at 5:30.
Unitarian Church, State and Huron
Streets. 11:00 a.m. The second of a
series of Forums on the general topic
of "World Clinic" will be held. Jose
M. Albaladejo and Professor Roy
Wood Sellars will discuss the topic:
''New Alignments In Europe."
7:30 p.m. Liberal Students' Union.
Richard Hamburger and Clara Stan-
ton, students, will discuss "Race Pre-
judice." Clark Boyd will be "devil's
advocate."

Adopted by a Chinese in Chicago
11 years ago and sent to China, this
American youth, now 18, is shown
on his arrival in Seattle from China
on his way to Chicago to find out
who his real parents are. Ile lived
in Kwantung Province until his fos-
ter mother died a year ago. He has
forgotten what English he knew as.
a child and remembers only that,
his American Christian name is
Harold.
Promise 'Ensians
Read For May 20
The 42nd Michiganensian in', the
University's history will be ready for
distribution May 20, Irving A. Mat-
thews, "38, business manager, an-
nounced yesterday.
A new arrangement which features
color on every page, with three colors
blended by the air-brush system used
in Esquire, help to /makethis year's
'Ensian better than ever before, ac-
cording to John McFate, '38, editor.
The women's section of the mag-
azine this year will have sorority pic-
.ures made up from individual photo-
graphs rather than from' the groups
,vhich have been used in the past,
3etty gatward, '38, women's editor,
said.
Read It In The Daily

Nino Martini, distinguished opera-
tic and movie star, who was recently
injured in a railroad accident in New
York, will be the star at the Friday
evening concert of the May Festival
which will be held during the four
days of May 11, 12, 13 and 14. Mr.
Martini has never before been,heard
in Ann Arbor.
Other soloists will include Marian
Anderson, Negro contralto, who will
be featured in the opening concert;
Agnes Davis, soprano; Arthur Hack-
ett, tenor; Chase Baromee, bass, who
will sing the solo role in Rachman-
inoff's setting of Edgar Allen Poe's
poem and Artur Rubenstein, Polish
pianist, who will be heard in the
second half of the same program.
Albert Spalding, American violin-
ist, will be the soloist at the Friday
afternoon concert, while Marjorie
Lawrence, distinguished Australian
Wagnerian soprano, will sing a num-
ber of operatic arias in the All-Wag-
ner program Saturday afternoon. At
the Saturday evening concert a
galaxy of stars will be heard, includ-
B anker Outlines
Manager's Job
Dodge Talks Before 200
Business School Alumni
(Continued from Page 1)
thinking job; and he must understand
business process, for he must have
wisdom as well as knowledge.
'The manager must have initia-
tive-the will to action; he must.think
objectively, unemotionally, detached;
and he must be able to do simple
thinking. He must be abe to get'
hold of principles and forget the
distracting details."
The conference will continue at
9:30 a.m. today in Room 3-16-320 of
the Union. At 6:30 p.m. in the Union,
Lawrence Dennis, economist for E. A.'
Pierce and Co., will address the con-
ference on "Outstanding Factors in
the Business Situation."
Other features of today's program
include addresses by Dean Clare.E.
Griffin of the business administra-
tion school and President Ruthven at
the luncheon, and the presentation
of Beta Gamma Sigma scholarship
keys by Prof. Richard U. Ratcliff of
the business administration school.'
The Glee Club will sing.

Nino Martini Will Be Featured
Friday In Festival oncert

ing Hilda Burke, soprano ,Bruna
Castagna, contralto: Giovanni Mar-
tinelli, tenor; Chase Baromeo; bass,
Richard Bonelli, baritone; Arthur
Hackett, tenor; and Hardin Van
Deursen, baritone.
The Philadelphia Orch'estka, under
Eugene Ormandy, will participate in
all of the concerts; while the Univer-
sity Choral Union under Prof. Earl
V. Moore of the music school will be
heard in two concerts, performing
"The Bells" and "Bizet's "Carmen."
The Young People's Festival Chorus
of 400 voices under Juva Higbee, will
)resent a group of songs and also
,he American premiere of an interest-
ing work entitle d"Paul Bunyan" by
ing work entitled "Paul Bunyan" by
Dorothy James. The baritone solo in
this work will be sung by Hardin Van
Deursen.
League Will "'91:
Sculpture Exlhibi t
The ninth annual exhibition of
sculpture done at the University will
bring patrons of the plastic arts ftom
all over the State to the League next
week.
Among those art lovers present: will
be. John Barbirolli, conductor of the
New York Philharmonic, Pre'idert
and Mrs. Alexander G. Ruthven, Mr.
Herbert Russel, chairman of the city
planning commission of Detroit and
Mrs. Russel.
The exhibition - will be formally
opened by a dinner Monday night at
which Mr. Russel will speak.
Pieces lent by persons outside the
University as well as pieces by stu-
dents and the faculty under Prof.
Avard Fairbanks will be displayed in
the League Concourse.
Cerle ,Francais Selects
Officers For Next Year
Martha Dynes, '39, was re-elected
president of the Cercle Francais for
next year at a meeting of the club
Thursday night in the League.
Marcia Connell, '39, was chosen
vice-president; Helen Owstan, '39,
secretary; and John Stiles, '39, treas-
urer. The new officers will take of-
fice at the club's final banquet on
May 19. Prof. Rene Talamon of the
romance. language department, fac-
ulty leader of the club who will go
on 'sabbatical leave next year, gave
a farewell speech.

I

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OTTO'S IN N
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Accordion
Studio

Roy Berry's Barber Shop
816 South State
CONVENIENCE keynotes the State and Packard shopping dis-
trict. Located within a few blocks of the center of the campus
residential district, it provides to the many students living in
adjacent areas practically all of the facilities they find occasion
to use.

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Phone 2-1280

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015 /2 Packard St.
Phone 7432

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