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May 01, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN D AI LY

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 1938

.oca1 Churches Relizeable Reforms Are Brought Forth
~ T

Pope Pius SeesDean vI~enneU FearsFudMein
Toe___CaeyConstr~ucted Ho-mesTusa

Fecature Y ried
SubjectsToday
'China Forced To Unite,,
Will Be Topic Discussed
in UnitarianPulpit
"The World On May Morning" will
be the topic of the Rev. William P.
Lemon's sermon this morning at thet
10:45 a.m. service of the First Pres-
byterian Church. The two choirs
under the direction of Claire Coci
and Mrs. Fred Mons will present
special music for the May Morning
Service.
The first of a series of Sunday
morning forums on the general sub-
ject of a "World Clinic" will be held
thismorning at the Unity rian Church
at 11 a.m.. The Rev. H. P. Marley
anid Ching k. Yang Grad., will dis-
cuss "China Forced to Unite." Prof.
Richard Fuller of the sociology de-
partment will speak to the Liberal
Students Union of the same church
on "Prejudice-Inherited Or Ac-
quired."
Frank McCulloch well known Chi-
cago attorney will speak on "The
Church's Relationship=to Labor," to
the Student Guild of the First Con-
gregational Church at 7:30 p.m. The
meeting, which will follow the week-
ly student supper at 6 p.m., is open'
to the public.
The Disciples Guild, student club
of the Church of Christ, will discuss
"You and the Next War" at 6:30 p.m.
Prof. Albert K. Stevens of the Eng-
lish department will address the Epis-
copal Student Guild at 7 p.m. in Har-
riss Hall. His subject will be "The
History and Development of the Co-
operative Movement."
Prof. George Carrothers of the
School of Education will speak to
the Lutheran Student Club at 5:30
in the Zion Parish Hall. Professor
Carrothers is also leader of the 9:45
a.m. Sunday School class of the First
Methodist Church held in Stalker
Hall.
Municipal Market To Sell
Books For Scholarships
More than 3,500 second-hand books
anid magazines will be sold next
Thursday and Friday at the Muni-
cipal Market to raise money for woin-
en's scholarships to the University,
it was announced yesterday.
The project is being sponsored by
the junior University alumnae group,
with the books collected through do-
nations by townspeople. Miss Mar-
garet Cowie is general chairman.

At Eighth Annual Sprin g Bull Session
______- - -- -' -- -- ''
(Continued frm 'age 1) to investigate immediately the pos- was rejected on the threat of fur-
the status quo by -Joseph S. Mattes, sibility of providing student housing ther encroachment into education.
managing editor of The Michigan subsidized by state, federal or private During the discussion, Prof. Robert
Daily. funds, this committee to work with [Brigs of the economics department
The defense, Alfred H. Lovell, ar- the President and the Board of Re- went on record with the statement.
gued that vocal expression of opinion gents and to welcome among its mem- that, "There is no disposition on the
is never curtailed, but that the bers a sociologist, an economist, an part of the University to put sorori-
University should not be expected to architect and a real estate expert." ties or fraternities off the campus. Cur
spend funds for a speaker who has General condemnation of the pres- aim," he said, "is to okeep fraternities.
above a certain moral, intellectual t
been invited -to the campus by a mi- ent housing situation was the con-
n and financial level. In this way only
nority of 2,000. Lovell advocated per- sensus, with confusion at the opening will they be assured of permannce."
fect freedom for Daily editors if their of the session as to means of alleviat~ hed
"judgment is all right." ing student burdens

Local Pastor Is Received]
With Three Detroit Men

The inertia of the student body
and its apathy toward current social
problems loomed large in the discus-
sion. Prof. Preston W. Slosson of
the history department and Prof.
Louis A. Strauss of the English de-
partment emphasized that far from
suppression of discussion in class,
rooms they have difficulty eliciting
such expression. This followed the
recital of an incident in which a
professor refused to allow a student
to express an "opposition" opinion.
The University of Michigan, Inc.
and Faculty and Students, Limited,
was suggested by one student who!
supported a view that suppression of
opinion proceeded from a conflict of
ideologies between the University as a
business organization and the stu-
dents and faculty in search of educa-
tion.
Housing
The housing section culminated its
discussion with the passage of the
following memorandum to the general
session that "we would recommend
to the Student Senate Housing Com-
mittee that they establish a committee

The session generally agreed that
the landladies were not to be blamed
wholly for the high price of rooms or
for unsanitary conditions, but that
the system under which they lease the
homes and then sublet the rooms was
the direct cause.
Justification of a housing study in
connection with the Parley's general
topic was made on the grounds that
"education is a sum total and should
also see that students are graduated
psychologically sound as well as ba-
sically grounded in American his-
tory."
A further resolution that "the Stu-
dent Senate consider the abolition of
University approved rooming house"
contracts," was tabled and will be
referred to the Student Senate's com-
mittee.
Denunciation of the local attitude1
on housing Negro students was made,
but action was not taken by the ses-
sion to suggest any reforms.
Throughout the discussion, cooper-
atives, fraternities and ordinarily
amortized dormitories were termed
only temporary solutions with out-
right government subsidization the
only ultimate answer. Federal aid

Security
The plight of the student worker!
was stressed by Tom Downs, '39, in-
dictor, in opening the security ses-
sion. The chief problem, he indicat-
ed, arises because there are too many
students for the jobs available, lead-
ing to low wages, poor working con-I
ditions and general insecurity.
According to Prof. John F. Shepard
the NYA appropriatior, vhich wasI
cut along with all other relief appro-
priations, was slashed too sharply.j
The two students, he said, working in
his office have not been getting
enough to eat..

FEBy JACK SULLIVAN o lunn ity Group T1 List
Fear of a flood of cheaply and poor- Officers For Next Year
ly constructed homes was expressed
yesterday by Dean Wells I. Bennett The annual meeting of the Ann
of the architecture school who has Arbor Community Fund. at which the
just returned from the annual con- chairman and subsidiary officers for
vention of the American Institute of
Architects at New Orleans. next year's campaign will be an-
"The' feeling exists among archi- nounced, will be held at 6:30 p.m.
teets," Dean Bennett said, "that with ; Tuesday in the Union.
the pressure for low-cost housing so .B head of the
strong and the stagnation that seems Dr. Ernest B. Harperead ofche
to hold back construction, a situation sociology department at Michigan
is developing which if not controlled State College, will give the principal
will lead to an increase in 'jerry build- address on "The Future and Private
ing' throughout the country." Social Service." Walter R. Drury,
r: an Bennett believes that under president of the Ann Arbor Commu-
h Fa B ouingbele Authrity plns nity Fund, will be the toastmaster.
the Federal Housing Authority plans Twcitisnhnr fhe2h
lor new houses have been very well Two citations, in honor of the 25th
carried out, and a continuance of anniversary of, "Community Chest
t~he federal program will maintain a and Council,, Inc.," the present or-
t andaid of valueap in housingthigh ganization of the Community Fund,
enough to eliminate 'jerry' building, will be presented to two Ann Arbor
"The encouraging thing for thou- t men who have been deemed the most
,ands who want small homes at low outstanding in civic work in the past
cost." Dean Bennett pointed out. "is few years.
lhe tlan to concentrate on the prob- Although the c".tire community is
lem in an effort to produce a good invited to attend tI ' meeting, ac-
houe of small size at around $3.000." cording to Everett R. 12mes, execu-
Architects from different sections of tive secretary of the FL:nd, formal
the country are already or'gani7ing invitations will be issued only to
to offer a special service for this kind agency board members and m .xibers
of building. The success of such a of the board of trustees.
program depends upon the stability Officers of the Board of Directors
of economic conditions and low cost of the Fund and the chairman and
financing. The cooperation between vice-chairman of the Budget com-
architects, manufacturers of supplies mittee for next year's campaign also
and labor. Dean Bennett said, is also will be announced at the banquet
essential. meeting:

l
C
x
i
5
3

POPE PIUS XI.

The Rev. Fr. Thomas R., Carey,
pastor o: St. Tnomas Catholic church

Dr. Robertson, assistant adminis- here, was received by Pope Pius ii
(Continued on Pa e .r Rome yes trday along With three De
troit priests.
Window Displays Feature The Rev. Fr. Allen J. Babcock, vie.
'ectoir of the North American col
Books On Child Welfare lege and formerly assistant to Fath
Window displays of bookas relating'Carey, arranged the audience and ac
Windw dsplas o boks ielaingcompanied the foui'. Traveling orlon{
to child welfare and juvenile delin- mithpFathei Carey are the Rt. Re
quency will be shown in local book Msgr. John M Doyle, chancellor
store windows today until May 7, as a the Detroit diocese before it becam
feature of National Youth Week. an archdiocese; Rt. Rev. Msgr. Dan
The books have been selected from iel J. Ryan, rector of Sacred Hear
lists compiled by Professor Lowell J. Eemrinary, Detroit; and the' Rev.- F
Carr. director of the Michigan Child G. Warren Peck, pastor of St. John
Guidance Institute; Mrs. Gordon W. church, Ypsilanti.
Brevoort, director of the Family Wel-
fare Bureau; and Miss Edith Thomas,
who is in charge of library extension ELECTED TO PIl BETA KAPPA
service and a lecturer in library sci- Robert A. Nabatoff, '39, also wa
ence. The Ann Arbor Public Library elected to Phi Beta Kappa, accordir
will display these lists on its bulletin to Orma F. Butler, secretary of t
boards. group.

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ASA-"------~.--

II

TODAY
THROUGH TUESDAY

,,

!I-

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

;I_

.

WJR
P.M.
6:00-Stevenson Sports.
6 :15--Musical.
6:30-Phil Baker.
7:00-May Day Musical Festivities.
7:15-To Be Announced.
7:30-Musical Gazette.
9:00-Grand Central Station.
9:30-Vocal Varieties.l
9:45-'-Musical.
10:00--Abe Lyman's Orch.
10:30 Duke Ellington's Orch.
11:00-News-Jack King./
11:05--Harry Owen's Orch.
11:30-Nat Brandwynne's Orch.
WWj
P.M
6:00-Jack Benny.
6 :30-Interesting Neighbors.
7:00- CharleyMcCarthy.
8:00--Manhattan Merry-Go-Round.
8:30--American Album of Familiar
Music.
9:00-Hour of Charm.
9:30-Dorothy Thompson.
9:45-Symphonic Variations.
10:00-NBC Symphony.
10:15-Dance Music.
10:30-Press Radio News.
10:35-Dance Music.

as
he

CKLW
P.M.
6 :00---Hawaii Calls.
7 :30-dCharioteers.
7 :45--Newstesters.
6:30-The Hart Hqus'e String Quartet.
7:00-The WOR Forum.
7:30-Charioteers.
8:00---Music Hour.
9:00-The Goodwill Hour.
9 :30-Pontiac Baptist Church.
10:00-Your Sunday Date.
10:15-Louis Prima's Orch.
" 10:30-Old Fashioned Revival.
11:30-Canadian Club Reporter.
11:45-Bob Crosby's Orch.
12:00-Dick Liebert's Orch.
12:30-Ray Keating's Orch.
1:00-The Dawn Patrol.
WXXz
P.M.
6:000-News.
6 :15-Mellow Music.
6:30-Ozzie Nelson Orch.
7:00--World's Fair Music Fest.
8:00-Hollywood Playhouse.
8:30-Walter Winchell.
8:45-Irene Rich.
9:00-Donald Novis Sings.
9:15-Norman Cloutier's Orch.
9:30--Cheerio.
10:00-Press Bulletins.
10 :05-Dance Music.
10:30-Lou Breese Orch.
11:00-Harry Owen's Orch.
11:30-Barney Rapp's Orch.
12 :00-Fletcher Henderson's Orch.

lay 16 through Juiw 18
PAULINE LORD - ALINE MacMAHON - JANE COWL
"The Ghost of Yankee Doodle"; "Liiomn"; "The Late Christopher
Bean;" "French Without Tea's;" "Rain from Heaven."
Prices: $2.50, $3.60, $4.80 and $6.60 for Season Tickets
SEASON TICKETS NOW ON SALE
Garden Room - Michigan League

f0
uO LICProduction
A Paramount Picturs with a cast' of thousands Including
A'm TAMtROFF - Margot GRAHAME - Walter BRENNAN
IAN KEITH - ANTHONY QUINN - DOUGLASS OUMBRILLE - BEULAH BONDI
ROBERT BARRAT.- HUGH SOTHERN - LOUISE CAMPBELL - EVELYN KEYES
Added-
S"PiGSKIN CH AMPIONS" -- PETE SMITH NOVELTY

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CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

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u11

FOR RENT
FOR RENT: June 1st, four-room fur-
nished apartment. Frigidaire, laun-
dry. First floor. Phone 3403. 209
N. Ingalls. 511
FOR SALE
WASHED SAND and .ravel. Drive-
way Gravel. Killins Gravel Co.
Phone 7112.' 7x
NOTICES
NOTICE: Princeton bear jackets and
hats with Michigan seal. Natural
or M colors. Lowest prices. Call
2-3596 evenings. 504
VIOLA STEIN, 706 Oakland. Phone
6327. Experienced typist. Reason-
able rates. 232
TYPING:Experienced. Reasonable
rates. L. M. He1ywood, 803 E. King-
sley St. Phone 8344. 10x
TYPING, neatly and accurately done.
Mrs. Howard, 613 Hill St. Phone
5244. 3x
CLOTH ING WANTED TO BUY: A)n
old and new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru-
ments. Ready cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices.
WANTED
MEN and womliell are offered thn
highest cash pices for their dis-
carded clothing. See Claude Brown,
512 S. Main. Phonc 2-2736. 388
WANTED: 4 room unfurnished
apartment. June 10. S.E. of Cam-
pus. Phone 2-3914. 516
DRIVEWAY

I,,

SERVICE

11

I

is what we want to give to you. We want you
to ask our advice and help on all paint ques-
tions or problems that confront you. Call or
phone, and we will be very glad to assist you
in any way we can. A free parking space next
to our store for yOUr convenience.
Phone 2-1350
WEST AiNT
300 East Washington-

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SHOWS TODAY: 1 - 3 - 5 - 7 - 9 P.M.

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Aduls 35k

Children 1Oc

r J2tETWL

NOW PLAYING!

o .~. STAR$ ALL AROUND HER
r °... in her hest-of-all musical! :
4e Xf r s j,
w0
,.tery\ SJO
swp..p
loci~'.

GRAVEL

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II a ~u u w' - ~

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