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February 20, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, FEB. N

New Labor Law May Imperil
Print Contract With University

(Continued from Page 1)
day. Negotiations will be resumed
Muonday afternoon, Kuchar said.'
M\eanwhile, in a statement to the
1a iy, Wiltse said:
"The picketing of the Ann Arbor
Press is not a legitimate strike. No
demand has ever been made by these
former employes on the Ann Arbor
Press. Outside agents claiming to
represent the Typographical Union
have asked for a closed shop contract.
The policy of the Ann Arbor Press for
many years has been to employ union
and non-union men alike and to bar
no one from our employ except on
a basis of his competency. This pol-
icy will be continued. The average
w ages earned by the men picketing
were over $45 a week during the past
;ear as our books will show. They
have left our employ without good
reason."
Harry A. Reifin, ITU organizer of
Detroit, answered that employes often
had worked as much as 75 hours a
week.
Wiltse, who told the Daily that "the
situation is unchanged and will re-
nain unchanged until the end of time
as 'far as I'm concerned," contended
that the strikers broke a collective
agreement they had made with his
company.
He referred to their membership
in the Independent Association of Ann
Arbor Press Employes, Inc., which has
an agreement with the company.
Reifin claimed the Independent As-
sociation is no more than a company
union, under the domination of the
employer, and that it is not incor-
porated.

Reifin, in reiterating the union's
lemands, made the following state-
ment:
"The Typographical Union intends
to continue its aggressive campaign
1against the firm until, by realizing
its objective in bringing the firm
within the fold of shops under con-
tract, it has stabilized the printing
industry to such an extent that its
competitors may be able to continue
paying union wages, and employes will
enjoy a maximum 40-hour work-
week, time and a half for overtime,
and a sense of security of employ-
ment which will forever be denied
them under present conditions when
men are forced to work 80 to 90 hours
per week at straight time rates in
order to make a decent living."
The union continued to claim that
16 employes are on strike, while Wiltse
claimed the number is 10.
British Cabinet Rift
Causes *New Crisis
(Continued from Page 1)
that the ministers had reached a de-
cision either on France's appeal, on
a settlement with Italy or had solved
Britain's own crisis at one of the
gravest moments in Europe's post-
war history.
Despite strict secrecy on Cabinet
discussions, reports in diplomatic
quarters said Eden firmly had backed
the French view that the time was
inopportune for any agreement too
closely resembling capitulation to II
Duce.

Tense World
Awaits itler
Fu hrer addresses Reich
In World Crisis
(Continued from Page 1)
broadcast Hitler's speech seemed an-,
other step toward realization of Hit-
ler's dream of "the union of all the
German race."
The Czechoslovakian broadcast de-!
cision was taken as a sign ancient
Bohemia, caught in a vice between
German Silesia and Nazi-tending
Austria, might lend a more willing
ear to Hitler's probably certain de-
mands that autonomy be granted the
German minority in Czechoslovakia.
If granted, the 3,000,000 Germans
affected would achieve a status some-
what like the Germanic cantons of
Switzerland.
With the rich Saar Basin again a}
part of the Reich, with the ostensibly
"free" city of Danzig taking orders
from Berlin, and Austria all but a
Nazi province, exposed little Czecho-
slovakia seemed the logical point for
the next Nazi expansionist move to
be proclaimed in Der Fuehrer's
speech.E
From autonomy for the German
minority it might be only a question
of time until German-speaking Bo-
hemia, seat of the important Skoda
Munitions Works, would proclaim
"Anschluss," uniting it with Germany.

Independents Plan
Sports Competition
(Continued from Page 1)
men in each event, and the winners
and winning-districts will be awarded
medals.
A track meet will be held on
Tuesday, March 29. There will be
10 events and the competition will be
conducted in the same manner as the
swim meet.
Following the spring recess, an ex-
tensive outdoor program has been
planned, which will include.all-cam-
pus tournaments in softball, tennis,i
horseshoes and golf.
The Executive Council of Congress
yesterday stated that anyindependent
man is eligible to file a nominating
petition for district office. These pe-
titions for the March 1 election are
to be filed in the Union offices of Con-
gress.
HILLEL HAYRIDE
A hayride party, sponsored by the
Hillel Independents, will be held at
5:30 p.m. today. The party includes
a country barn dance where refresh-
ments will be served. Reservations
can be made at Hillel Foundation.
j ~School of Social

Churches Present
Many Varied Topics
(Continued from Page 1)
social hour will follow the meeting
and refreshments will be served by
Mrs. E. B. Clark's committee.
"Hitler Versus Niemoeller-An An-
cient Controversy in a New Garb," is
the subject of the address by the
Rev. H. P. Marley at the 6:00 p.m.
service of the Unitarian Church. Fol-
lowing the Coffee Hour at 7:00 p.m.
Prof. Mowat G. Fraser of the School
of Education will lead a discussion on
"Dare the School Build a Democ-
racy?"

SECR ETAR IA L d
BUSINESS TRAINING
CLASSES NOW FORMING
FREE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
Hamilton Business College
23rd Year Phone 7831 William at State

!1'

1

Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classifiedi Ads-

1

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
Presents
Salvador de
M aaig

B

Dancing
Taught daily, 10 to 10.
Terrace Garden StudioI
2d Floor, Wuerth The-
ater Bldg. Phone 96:5.

_s_ ie Drectoy

X ~fR D HflHT!,BUT A
. a

Chief of the disarmament section of the League
of Nations and formerly Spain's ambassador to
the United States and France.
Speaking on

F'

1

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY WANTED: by efficient
lauidress. Prices reasonable. Call
for and deliver. Phone 5227. 334
STUDENT LAUNDRY. Shirts 12c.
Call for and deliver. Phone 4863 for
other prices. 360
SILVER LAUNDRY
Phone 5594E LA 607 E. Hoover
Call Tor and Del'ver-Free of Charge
PRICES ARE FOR WASHING
AND IRONING
Shorts ........................4c
Tops......................... 4c
Socks (pr.) . .................. 3
Pajamas.......................10
Shirts .......................14c
Satisfaction Guaranteed
Individually Done-No Marking
236
LATJNDRY. 2-1044, Sox darned.
Careful work at low r rices.
NOTICES
VIOLA STEIN, 706 Oakland. Phone
4327. Experienced typist. Reason-
P ble rates. 232
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
old ad new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$8, $25. Ladies fur coats, typewrit-
ers, old gold and musical instru-
ments. eady cash waiting for you.
Phone Sam. 6304.
FOR RENT
SUNNY quiet room. Excellent bed.
Private home. Meals if desired.
Phone 2-2943. 388
ATTRACTIVE front suite suitable for
two. 815 Arch. Phone 3079. 403
LIGHT airy suite; one double room
and 'one single room. Hot water
at all times. 615 Monroe. 402
DOUBLE ROOM. $2.75 for each per-
son. 1021 E. Huron. Phone 8482.
404
ONE SINGLE and one double room
for men students. 420 Thompson.
Phone 2-1559. 400
LARGE DOUBLE with adjoining lav-
atory. Also single and unexpected
vacancy in suite with private bath
and shower. Steam heat. Phone
8544. 422 E. Washington. 401
917 CHURCH STREET: Large, warm
front room. $2.50 double. $3.50
single. Boys preferred. Phone 7379.
395
CLOSE to campus. Clean, newly dec-
orated single and double room at
right price. 411 Hamilton. 394
FOR SALE
DRIVEWAY GRAVEL. Killin's Gravel
Company. Tel. 7112. 7x
FANCY APPLES, sweet cider, pop-
corn. Will deliver. Phone 3926. 1003
Brooks. 390
OAK WOOD, best grade, for fireplace,
orfurnace. Delivered. 106 Barker
TABLE
DECORATIONS
for
Washington's
Birthday
from

Road, Whitmore Lake.
or 2-1964 mornings.

1938 PLYMOUTH 4-door trunk sedan.
Driven only 1,800 miles. Need
money. Cheap sale. Please call 3360
for Chang. 365
WANTED
THE FAMOUS Craigleith Woolen
Company, importers of exclusive
line of scottish yarns, woolens, etc.
desires young lady as representa-
tive. Excellent income assured.
Send card with phone to Mr. Slade,
1223 Hill Street, Ann Arbor for par-
ticulars. 399
TYPING-Carefully and accurately
done, L. M. Heywood, 803 E. King-
sley St. Phone 8344. 106
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: Candid camera, call 8911
and ask for Jim. 358

WHAT

is,

PEACE?

I

Phone 57.
392

I

Thursday Feb. 24
8:15 P. M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
Single Admissions . . 75c and 50c
TICKETS ON SALE AT WAHR'S NOW

AUR
I

I

I

r

FISHOW'S WATCH
and
JEWELRY REPAIR
347 Maynard Cor. William
Watch Crystals 35c

SHOWS CONTINUOUS:

1:00 to 11:30 p.m.

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