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May 19, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEIDNEItY, i'VIAY 19, 191,41

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Library Steps
Will Be Scene
Of Band Show'
Spring Concert To Feature
Novelty Numbers; Make
Awards Wednesday
The 80-piece Varsity Concert Band,
under the direction of Prof. William
D. Revelli of the School of Music,
will present an informal concert at
7:15 p.m. Tuesday on the library
steps. Bleachers will be set up.
According to Professor Revelli, the
band intends to make novelty num-
bers its strong point in this program.
Also included in the concert will be
the "Coronation March," by Meyer-
beer; "Spring Time Overture," by
Erik W. G. Leidzen; "Habanera," by
Charles Benter; "Elsa Entering the
Cathedral," from the opera, "Lohen-
grin," by Richard Wagner; "Spring,
Beautiful Spring," by Paul Lincke;
"L'Arlesienne," part 2 of suite num-
ber 2', by Georges Zizet; and "Panto-
mime," from the opera, "Il Cid," by
Antonio Sacchini.
Has Full Program
The band has a full program for
the rest of the year. Saturday, it
will play at the Western Outdoor
Track and Field Meet. On Sunday,
the band will lead the Seniors' Swing-
out ceremonial procession from the
diagonal to Hill Auditorium. Tues-
day, the concert is to be given. On
Wednesday, the annual spring ban-
quet will be held, to which many guest
conductors have been invited. At
that time, the annual awards will be
made.
The following men who have served
one year in the band will receive
silver charms:
W. T. Anderson, '40; C. R. Avery,
40; A. D. Berg, '39; D. A. Black, '38;
H. A. Bruinsma, '37; V. E. Cherven,
'40; D. L. Chrisman, '4SM; C. W.
Clark, '40; E. L. Cooper, '40; R. V.
Correll, '40; F. M. Davis, .
M. L. Dleutsch, '39; J. A. ?Gribble,
'38; A. R. Kauppi, '37SM; A. W. Kol-
jonen, '37M; T. R. Krupa, '39SM;
H. F. Lathrop, '38; D. L. Marrs, '40-
SM; H. J Martin, '40SM; E. R. Pflug-
hoeft, '40SM; E. D. Racz, '29M; W.
H. Sawyer, '38SM; E. R. Sheckman,
'39; M. J. Soldofsky, '37SM; E. J.
Stanke, Grad.; E. L Stewart, '40; K.
W. Summerfelt, '40SM; C. G. Tolbert,
'38SM; E. J. Vandenberg, '38E; L. J.
Vanmanen, '40; J. D. Wallace, '40;
0. C. Zahnow, '38; F. W. Weist, '38-
SM; M. A. Mitchell, Grad.; J. A.
White, '38M..
Second Year Men
Second year men who will get
sweaters are R. F. Anthony, '39; R. M.
Ash, '37; D. R. Cooper, '39; W. N.
Findley, '37E; W. C. Parkinson, '39E;
S. C. Richards, '39SM; D. K. Rider,
'39; G. F. Roach, '39; W. G. Wheeler,
39; H. Farber, '37; C. F. Keen, '38SM;
J. J. Deike, '39M.
Third year men who will receive
gold charms are R. L. Anthony, '38;
H. L. Cohodes, '38; R. S. Hawley, '38;
J. J. Houdek, '38M; E. A. Jones, '38;
E. R. Silfies, '37M; W. J. Lichten-
wanger, '378M; G. A. Miller, '38SM;
C. Vroman, '37SM.
Fourth year men to get blankets
are B. A. Goldberg, '37; G. H. Hei-
bein, '37F&C; O. N. Reed, '37SM; F.
l. Sundstrom, '37M; E. D. Kisinger,
'37SM.
On Thursday, the band has two
engagements. First they will play
at the annual R.O.T.C. drill and pa-
rade and then will take part in the
women's Lantern Night. During
commencement services, the band
will play for the Community Dinner
which is to beheld on June 14, in the
Intramural Building: They will also
present several concerts at the dif-
ferent centennial programs.
Adult Education

Groups Discuss
Current Affairs
(Continued from Page 1)
Davis: the southern agrarian point
of view, as demonstrated by the works
of Ellen Glasgow, the liberal concep-
tion, as held by Josephine Lawrence,
and the proletarian or Marxist out-
look of John Dos Passos, James T.
Farrell and Josephine Johnson.
Speaking on "Gathering and Writ-
ing the News," C. A. Player, of the
Flint :Journal, said that newspapers
have become modernized in the last
few years.
He pointed out that the reorgani-
zation of newspapers has started at
the top with the editor, and has con-
tinued on down to the reporters. Mr.
Player also declared that newspapers
cater a great deal to public opinion.
The modern department of public
health is fast outgrowing its old func-
tion of enforcing certain laws and is
now turning to the dissemination of
education, Dr. Henry F. ,Vaughan of
Detroit declared yesterday.
"Today, people for the most part
observe the laws, which the health
department was created to enforce,
as they realize that they are for their
benefit," Dr. Vaughan said. "The ob-
servance of laws is not enough. Fur-
ther reductions in death rates, total,
infant mortality and for specific
ont imnnvement in the gen-

Final Examinations Will Be Held June 3 To 12

SECOND SEMESTER, 1936-37
For College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; School of Educa-
tion; School of Music; School of Forestry and Conservation; School of
Business Administration; and Graduate School, as compiled by Prof.
Harry C. Carver of the mathematics department.

Time of Exercise
Exam. (To be used only
Group in case no group
Letter letter is listed)
A Monday at 8
B Monday at 9
C Monday at 10
D Monday at 11
E Monday at 1
F Monday at 2
G Monday at 3
H Tuesday at 8
I Tuesday at 9
J Tuesday at 10
K Tuesday at 11
L Tuesday at 1
M Tuesday at 2
N Tuesday at 3
O Special
*P Special
Q Special
R Special

having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the first quiz
period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examinations period in amount equal to that normally devoted to
such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned exami-
nation periods should be reported for adjustment to Professor J. C.
Brier, Room 3223 East Engineering Building, before June 1. To avoid
misunderstandings and errors, each student should receive notifica-
tion from his instructor of the time and place of his appearance in
each course during the period June 3 to June 12.
No single course is permitted more than four hours of examination.

Time of Exam
Monday, June
Friday, June
Saturday, June
Friday, June
Friday, June
Thursday, June
ruesday, June
Friday, June
Saturday, June
Tuesday, June
Wednesday, June
Saturday, June
Wednesday, June
Thursday, June
Monday, June
Thursday, June
Saturday, June
Thursday, June

7,
4,
5,
4,
11,
3,
8,
11,
5,
8,
9,
12,
9,
10,
7,
10,
12,
3,

9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

No date of examination may
Classification Committee.
Time of Exercise

be changed without the consent of the

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
E.M. 1, 2;

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
C.E. 2

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Time of Examination
Monday, June 7, 8-12
Friday, June, 4, 8-12
Saturday, June 5, 8-12
Friday, June 4, 8-12
Friday June 11, 8-12
Thursday, June 3, 8-12
Tuesday, June 8, 8-12
Friday, June 11, 2- 6
Saturday, June 5, 2- 6
Tuesday, June 8, 2- 6
Wednesday, June 9, 2- 6
Saturday, June 12, 8-12
Wednesday, June 9, 8-12
Thursday, June 10, 2- 6
*Thursday, June 10, 8-12
*Thursday, June 3, 2- 6
*Monday, June 7, 2- 6
*Tuesday, June 8, 8-12
*Thursday, June 10, 2- 6
*Saturday, June 12, 2-6

Local Students m
To See Lansing
IHouse, Senate
Attempts Being Made To'
Have Speaker Of House1
Address Them
Approximately 60 students of state1
government will have the opportunity
to see the Michigan Supreme Court
and Legislature in action tomorrow,
when the political science department
will sponsor a trip toiLansing.
The group of Political Science 2
students, accompanied by Prof. Har-
old M. Dorr, Prof. Paul M. Cuncan-
non, Floyd E. McCaffree and Joseph
E. Kallenbach, will leave Angell Hall
at 10:30 a.m. in buses for the State
capital.
The Supreme Court, the Senate and
the House of Representatives will be
-visited in the afternoon followed by
a dinner for which efforts are being
made to obtain the Lieutenant-Gov-
.rnor and the Speaker of the House
of Representatives to talk.
John R. Hulbert, '40, is chairman
of the committee in charge of the
trip. The committee consists of one
representative from each of the 15
Political Science 2 classes.
TO LEAD PARADE
EAST LANSING, May 18.--P)-
Dorothy Hasselbring, attractive soph-
omore at Michigan State College who
was chosen recently as queen to reign
over the agricultural open house and
carnival at the college Friday, will of-
ficially ascend her throne tomorrow
to lead a parade of floats through
the streets of Lansing and East Lan-
sing.

Van Devanter Plans
To Retire In June
(Continued from Page 1)
ileges and judicial service specified
in the act of March 1, 1937, entitled
an act to provide for retirement of
justices of the Supreme Court,' and to
that end I hereby retire from regular
active service on the bench-this re-
tirement to be effective on and after
the second day of June 1937, that be-
ing the day next following the ad-
journment of the present term of
the court."
A messenger hastened the note to
the White House. A secretary scanned
it briefly and hurriedly. took it to
the President. Mr. Roosevelt picked
up his pen and promptly wrote his
acknowledgement in long hand.
"I have received your letter of this
morning, telling me that you are re-
tiring from regular active service on
the bench on June 2, 1937.
"May I as one who had the priv-
ilege of knowing you for many years,"
extend to you every good wish.
"Before you leave Washington for
the summer it would give me great
pleasure if you would come in to see
me."
-1_____1I

(

*Correction-In the University Folder this group was wrongly sched-
uled from 2-5 p.m., Thursday, June 10.
Any deviation from the above schedule may be made only by mu-
tual agreement between students and instructor and with the approval
of the Examination Schedule Committee.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
June 3 to June 12, 1937
NOTE-For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time of
Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses

Look!

Surv. 1, 2, 4; Spanish
M.E. 3; Draw. 1, 2; French
E.E. 2a; Met. Proc. 2, 3, 4
Economics
Drawing 3; German

MEN'S Oak Leather Half Soles
and Rubber Heels ......9c

*This may be used as an irregular period provided there is no conflict
with the regular printed schedule above.

LADIES and Children's
Half Soles Cemented ...

49c

H

ughes Will See Ambition Come True
W ith His Portrayal Of Shylock Here

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

By ROBERT MITCHELL
An ambition of a long career will
be realized here next week when Gar-
eth Hughes, co-star of the 1937 Dra-
matic Season, plays the role of Shy-
lock in Shakespeare's "Merchant of
Venice." Hughes arrived here Mon-
day for first rehearsals of the play.
"There will never be a time,"'
Hughes stated, "when the works of
Shakespeare will not appeal to mod-
rn audiences or be adaptable to the
modern stage. Shakespeare is 'for all
time,' because he has a universal ap-
peal through his philosophy, his
beauty of language, and his comedy.
"From the actor's point of view,
Shakespeare is the beginning and end
of all acting. His works include
every experience and every emotion.
In them the actor learns how to use
his voice, hands, and body. I agree
with the great actress, Estelle Win-
wood, who has termed it enobling
to play in Shakespeare."
Shakespeares Appeal Universal
Hughes confirmed the universality
of Shakespeare by pointing out that
the "Merchant of Venice" has just
finished playing to full houses for
an eight-week period in Los Angeles
and that "King Richard" .is earning
$23,000 a week for its six-month run
in New York City.
As concerns the role of Shylock
which he will play here next week,
Hughes stated that efforts would
probably be made to present the char-
acter as nearly as possible in some
respects as it was in the time of
Shakespeare. At that time Bar-

bridge, costuming and make-up di- as being "one of the laudable things
rector for the Globe Theatre Com- I know of," and said that it was
pany, was acquainted with a Jewish especially important because ,of its
man in the court of Queen Elizabeth inception in a college town where
named Lopez. Lopez happened to be there was large and appreciative sup-
red-headed, and Barbridge got the port. He also stressed its opportunity
idea of red hair as a Jewish char- to give younger men and women a
acteristic. The first Shylock, there- chance to get into contact with the
fore, had red hair and a red beard, stage and pointed out the interest
though there is nothing at all in the in the theatre in Los Angeles, heart
play to that effect. of the moving picture industry.
Shylock Important "The season comes at the right
Shylock will be consicered a more time of the year, too," he added. "I
central figure in the Dramatic Sea- am always crazy to see the East in,
son production than the old tradi- the spring. The first thing I saw in1
tional villain. There will be more ef- getting in today were the lilac
fort to.interpret him as well as the bushes."
other characters in planning the Starred In New York
play. He is probably to be presented Born in Wales, Hughes did his first
as a younger man and more dignified theatrical work in London and. came
than before. to America in 1913 with the Welsh
Peggy Wood will play the role of Players. He was the lead ,in many
Portia, replacing Estelle Winwood, New York productions for the follow-
who played the part in Los Angeles ing 10 years and later was co-starred
and was -prevented from coming to with Ruth Chatterton in the "Green
Ann Arbor by the acceptance of a Hat." He has made several moving
moving picture contract. Hughes picture productions, including ."Sen-
stated that he admired Miss Wood timental Tommy," "The Christian,"
greatly and said of Miss Winwood, and others. He comes to Ann Arbor
"She is a gracious great lady." j from Los Angeles, where he has been
He praised the Dramatic Season playing Shylock this winter.
H. B. GODFREY 410 North 4th Avenue
Moving in tie City or State
OUT OF STATE VIA ALLIED VAN LINES
We'll be pleased to give information and estimates.

(Continued from Page 4)
University Horse Show: The Horse
Show will be held at the Fair Grounds,
on Saturday May 22 at 2:30 p.m. Stu-j
dents wishing to enter any event are
asked to call Dorothy White at 2-I
2591 or Jean Harley at 2-3281 (516).
All entries must be made by Thurs-
day, May 20.
Lutheran Student Club: Reserva-
tions for the Annual Senior Banquet
must be in the hands of Doris Yoder
8347, or Marguerite Groomes 8534 by
Thursday, May 20.
Lutheran Student Choir: All mem-
TYPEWRITERS
FOUNTAIN PENS
Student Suppies
0. T D. Morrill
3i4 SOUTH STATE f3TREET '

bers be on hand at 7:30 p.m., Friday
evening, at Zion Lutheran Parish
Hall. The concert begins at 8 p.m.
Student Alliance: There will be a
meeting of the Student Alliance,
Spanish Democracy section, at 7:30
p.m., Thursday in the League. All
ticket sellers of the Friends of Span-
ish Democracy and all those willing
to cooperate are asked to attend. The
meeting will discuss projects in con-
nection with the defense of the Span-
ish government. Room will be posted.
r.

LADIES Toplifts .........15c
MEN'S Oak leather
Half Sales.............75c
ZIPPERS and Zipper
Jackets Repaired 35c - $1.00
Nu Way
Shoe Repair"
516 E. William St.

DETROIT-BU FFALO
SERVICE,
NOW DAILY
Make Early Reservations with

Frederick S. Randall
TRAVEL SERVICE

12 Nickels Arcade

Phone 6040

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