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May 16, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 16, 1937

Co-Stars In First Dramatic Season Play

(Continued from Page 3)
Ellis Chares1
morning shut out Charley Boswell
with a 77. Boswell took an 82.
'Attack On Living Costs Is The afternoon singles matches saw
only Cisco scoring anything for In-
Inconsistent With Action,; diana, that a single point in his
Says Economics Head match with Saunders. Saunders took '
78 and Cisco 80.
With the administration following The other single matches gave
Withtheadmnistatin fllo i Emery a 75 to Beaver's 80; Barclay
policies which raise prices, President 73 over Eaton's 80; Karpinski 74 de-
Roosevelt's broadside against the high feating Mueller 74 to 80. Bill Grif-
cost of living was called highly incon-' fiths who took Warren's place in the!
sistent by Prof. Howard S. Ellis of afternoon matches shot 77 to Bos-
the economics department yesterday. well's 80.
It is true that prices have gone up ;
since 1933, wholesale indices have Miattes, Jones
risen from 80 to 144 during that
period, he said. But they have gone W in Le a d i*n I

Noted Swedish
EconomistWill
Discuss Polic
Prof. Bertil Gotthard Ohlin, pro-
fessor of economics in the School of
Business Administration of the Uni-
versity of Stockholm, Sweden will
speak at 4:15 p.m. Monday in Natural
Science Auditorium on "Swedish Eco-
nomic Policy in Boom and Depres-
sion." At 7:30 p.m. in the Union he,
will speak on current economic tend-
encies in Sweden before the eco-
nomics Club.
According to Prof. Howard E. Ellis.
Prof essor Ohlin is one of the top
ranking economists in the world to-
day. He has served the Swedish gor-
ernment as a member of tax and
t r e a t i e s commission, economics;
council, and as investigator of the
financial department of Sweden, a
country which is of interest because
of the fact that it has faithfully fol-
lowed the advice and program of its
trained economists.
Professor Ohlin was an undergrad-
uate at Lund University and did
graduate work at the Univeristy of
Stockholm, Grenoble, Cambridge
University and Harvard. He has
been lecturer and professor pro tem
at the University of Stockholm, pro-
fessor of economics at the University
of Copenhagen, and professor since
1929 at the University of Stockholm.
He directed investigations concern-
ing the world economic depression for
the League of Nations in 1931, and
has been director of several Swedish
and international commissions and
councils since 1933.
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MICHIGAN WOLVERINE
STUDENT CAFETERIA
--- LANE HALL
Notice to rnembers:
Refunds incident to the present year s op-
erations will be made on June5, 1937.
Those who so desire may apply their re-
funds toward the purchase of a meal ticket for
the week of May 30th; and receive the dif-

Above is Helen Chandler who will co-star in "Tonight at 8:30,"
the first production of the Dramatic Season which will open tomorrow
night. This will be the first time "Tonight at 8:30" is produced outside
of New York.'
Hiah Marketing Costs Is Great
Industrial Problem, Says Griffin

ference in cash.

1*

The above will be forfeited
after June 1, 1938

By JACK DAVIS
Reduction of marketing costs,1
which are often higher than the costs
of manufacturing the product was
characterized by Dean Clare E. Grif-
fin of the business administration
school as the most important prob-
lem industry has to face today.
Both the consumer who pays the
bill and the industrialists who is in-
dependent upon efficient and inex-
pensive marketing tokeep industry
operating smoothly are concerned in
reducing these costs he declared.
Legislation Blocks Solution
It is vital Dean Griffin continued
to both their interests that the efforts
on the part of industry to cut these
expenses should not be hampered by
small retailers who seek to artificial-
ly maintain the status quo.
These men through their organiza-
tions have succeeded in passing leg-
islation that blocks the efforts of
business to solve the problem.
Threat Of Boycott Used
"Fair price laws recently upheld by
the Supreme Court are of this type
he said, providing that the manu-
facturer may fix the price at which
his product is to be sold. Organized
shopkeepers however, are using them
as tools to peg prices at a level, which
will provide a margin of profit for
the least efficient retail unit. These
prices are considerably higher than
under free competition.

"The threat of boycott is used by
these men, through their trade as-
sociations to force the manufacturer
into line, Dean Griffin continued. To
him such laws are often of no bene-
fit, catching him between two fires
and compelling him to make an un-
welcome choice between them. Large
stores such as R. H. Macy are oppos-
ing these attempts bitterly, threaten-
ing to under sell with their own
brands if such a policy is adopted."
Roosevelt Opposes Proposal l
A proposal has recently been in-
trcduced in the Senate to provide
national enforcement of these laws.
President Roosevelt has gone on rec-
ord as opposing this measure believ-
ing that retail costs are too high al-
ready, said Dean Griffins. "I be-
lieve that such a proposal is unwise
not only for this but for other rea-
sons.
"From the scientific point of view,"
he concluded, "it is essential that in-
dustry attempt, through chain stores,
voluntary chains, retail cooperatives
and other methods to find the most
efficient marketing. For we know lit-
tle about the effectiveness of various
methods since results in this field
cannot be satisfactorily nieasured at
the present time. Experiment gives
us the only answers we have. These
battles must, however, be fought
fairly, with competition prevailing, in
order that the most efficient meth-
od may survive."

TYPEWRITERS
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314 SOUTH STATE STREET

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YOUR
CENTENNIAL
MICHIGAN TECHNIC
A Two-Page Airphoto of the Campus
A Training School Article
by Frank Dennison
Prof. Furnas of Yale writes -
"Progress - Scientific or Social"
-nt 'F; iveOherFatures-

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