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May 14, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

14, 1937

THE MIC14I N DAILY

PAGE THREE

TH IhGNIAL

PAGB&

Probe Of Disaster
Begun By Eckener
NEW YORK, May 13.-(P)-A six-
member German commission headed
by Dr. Hugo Eckener, grizzed lighter-
than-air wizard, began tonight two
hours before landing in New York an
inquiry into the disaster which rob-
bed Germany of her greatest airship,
the Hindenburg.
American investigators joined the
German commission in a stateroom
aboard the steamship Europa, and for
an hour after the liner reached its
pier the conference continued.
Then, in a procession of motor cars,
the German and Anmerican officials'
started for Lakehurst, N.J., in ac-'
cordance with Dr. Eckener's wish to
go immediately to the field where the,
Hindenburg exploded and burned last
Thursday, killing 36 of its passen-
gers and crew.

Martin ~
As Lw
Auditorium
Spring Bo

Sees Graduate Building
it Word In Consistency
Seats Have I from back to back is five to seven
~ttoms And inches more than is required in the'
best motion picture theatres, and thed

Volunteers For Tag Day Sales
Following is the list of Fresh Air Camp Tag Day salesmen with their
posts, times and instructions for the sale today:
1. Those who are not preceded by any volunteer at their posts
are asked to report at Lane Hall to pick up tags and buckets
2. Any question or difficulty should be reported immediately to the
Tag Day chairman, Lane Hall; telephone 8969. Volunteers not assigned-
to posts should report to Lane Hall. All these men will be used to
fill in posts, collect money, or canvas campus stores.
3. Solicitors stationed for downtown posts should report to Lane

4r

Spring Backs
S
By WILLIAM ELVINI
The Horace G. Rackham School
of Graduate Studies will be the epi-
tome of consistency, according to in-
formation from Dorr H. Martin, sup-
erintendent for the architects. l
The seats in the auditorium will
have spring seats and spring backs,
which will not hinder students from
indulging in the allegedly tradition-
al habit of sleeping during lectures,
and rows will be 39 inches apart in
order that those departing will notf
have to disturb any slumberers a
Mr. Martin stated that the 39 inches
REOPENING SALE
Oriental Rugs
ROOM SIZE
* Bejar Kirman
Large Selection of Scatters

E AT!o-
WE AL L EAT !
WHY NOT IN A
CONGENIAL PLACE?
Plate Lunches 15c - 20c - 25c
Red Hots Ice Cream
THE WAYNE
COFFEE SHOP
201 E. Liberty, cor. Fourth St.

* Shiraz
* Bokhara
0 Kabistan
o Runners

* Kirman
* Sarook
* Kazak
* Bejar

width of the seats, 22 inches mini-
mum, is four inches more than the
minimum in most theatres.
Has Carborundnum Finish
The entire exterior of the building
will be of Doyle darkhollowed Indiana
Limestone. The limestone, Mr. Mar-1
[tin stated, will have a carborundumI
finish, which will give it a marble-
like surface and will not absorb dirt.
Because of the expense involved, only
two other buildings in the United
Statesthave carborundum-finished
limestone, and Mr. Martin believes
that the new graduate school will be
[the first building entirely finished
with this treatment.
The carpeting which will be used
throughout the building will be of
specially woven design, and there will
be a built-in vacuum cleaning system
to clean the carpets, according to Mr.
Martin. Heating will be by concealed
radiation, and ventilation will be
"forced" by means of fails. Lights in
one of the rooms on the second floor,
he continued, will be suspended on
winches so that they can be lowered.
or raised as desired. Some rooms
will be panelled with wood and oth-
ers with plaster. Practically all ceil-
ings will be embellished with pre-
cast and run plaster work.
Window Frames Bronzed
Mr. Martin pointed out that all
window and door frames will be of
bronze,and the floor surfaces of the
first and second floors, which will be
used as terraces, will be of full-ranged
color flagstone. The main roof will
be of copper, finished with patina.
Patina is a green film formed on cop-
per by oxidation which is much
esteemed in art, the usual method of
obtaining it being to allow the copper
to weather for 10 or 15 years, but the
copper roof of the graduate school,
according to the superintendent, will
be treated with acid to give it the de-
sired quality immediately.
There will be two north entrances
and a main entrance from the south,
Mr. Martin stated, all of granite ex-
cept for the flagstone between steps.
This stone and granite will all be em-
bellishedby hand. The structure of
the building is a combination of con-
crete and steel forms, with concrete
floors and roof. The finish of each
of the rooms, Mr. Martin concluded,
will be a little more ornate than that
of the average college building.
Nelson Report

Hall.
4. Posts should not be left
be turned over to him. Thel
in his materials to Lane Hall.
5. Those scheduled for 11
until 12:35 p.m.
ENGINEERINGr ARCS

A.M.
7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:00
M
P.M.

Irving Brown.
Carl Gerstacker.
Gerald Klaasen.,
Don Siegel.
Dick Wangelin.
Ralph DuBois.
John Mensonides.
ax Schoetz.

A.M.
7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:30
P.M.
12:30- 2:00
2:00- 3:00

Bob Baldwin.
Frank Barnard.
Gil Tilles.
Jim Walker.
Gus Collatz.
Carl Abbott.
Frank Dannemiller.
John Park.
Fred Neal.
Herb Wolf.
Bud Lundahl.
Stan Birleson.
Tom Sullivan.

Mediation Steps
Begun As Steel
Strik~e Is Calledt
(By Associated Press)
Mediation efforts were begun
quickly yesterday as a long threat-
ened steel strike and new trouble in
the automobile industry ended a brief'
period of comparative freedom from
industrial disputes.
Gov. Frank Earle of Pennsylvania
flew to Pittsburgh to join conferences
already begun in the striking which
closed Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp.
plants. at Aliquippa, Pa., and Pitts-
burgh, leaving about 27,000 employes
idle.
Only a few minor clashes marred
the first day of the walkout.
While the Jones & Laughlin dispute
was being mediated, leaders of the
steel workers union asserted they-
were preparing for action against
other large independents in the field,

12:00- 1:00 Dick Sklarsky.
Norm Dickenson.
1:00- 2:00 Harold Spoden.
Bob Emmett.
2:00- 3:00 R. H. Rowland.
Les Goda.
ANGELL HALL, N. ENTRANCE

Cleaning and Repairing
by Native
N. L. MANGOU N1
207 Fritz Bldg. Tel. 7270

7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:30
P.M.
12:30- 2:00
2:00- 3:00

among which Jones & Laughlin
stands third.
Chief item in dispute was the sign-
ing of contracts with the steel work-
ers organizing committee, unit of the
Committee for Industrial Organiza-
tion.
-_ -
New Summer
Felt Campus Hots
$1.95
Hot Bands $1.00
Beautiful White Purses $1.00
Schiller's Millinery
219 South Main

until successor appears; materials may
last solicitor at each post should: turn
a.m. posts will remain at their posts
CENTER OF DIAGONAL

Mike Winn.
Dick Mattox.
Ted Perl.
Mary Kay.
C. Alexander.
Fred Walter.
Shirley Fishman.
Jane Holden.
Phil Westbrook.
Seymour Spellman.
Maurice Simon.
Chuck Seddenstein.

Joan Hanson.
Jack Carrol.

9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:30
P.M.
12:30- 2:00
2:00- 3:00

N. W. CORNER OF DIAGONAL
A.M.
7:45- 9:00 Bob Lodge.

SMART HATS
for the Suit or more dressy Costume.
MODERATE IN PRICE
22-23 Head Sies
DANA RICHARDSON
309 South State Street - At the Dillon Shop

ROMANCE LANGUAGE BLDG,
A.M.
7:45- 9:00 Virginia Voorhees.
Bill Bell.
9:00-10:00 John Hutzel.
Geil Duffendack.
10:00-11:00 Marian Smith.
Sue Potter.
11:00-12:30 Al Copley.
P.M.
12:30- 2:00 Dorothy Cox.
Betty Harwood.
2:00- 3:00 Ed Reed.

A.M.
7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:30
P.M.
12:30- 2:00
2:00- 3:00

G. A. Curtis.
Arthur Hulburt.
Joe Biller.
Dick Knowe.
Fred Columbo.
Carl Gulberg.
Roger Long.
ARCADE
Phil Loomis.
H. M. Campbell.
Cerdric Marsh.
Bob Osgood.
John McPhate.
Tuure Tenander.
Don Wilshire.
Bruce Telfer.
Ed D'Aprix.
Ernie' Jones.
Dan Hurly.
UNION
Marvin Reider.
Jim Hollinshead.
Ted Spangler.

,:
r
Ut
It
:I
( ~f
I
C).
(

Very, 'Very Popular..
White Doeskin
hate Kidskin
Ihite Gabardine
Other Styles $3.95
Charming "tip-toeless" Con
nies that simply beckon to
romance! The top and lower
sandals come with high or
cuban heel!
JACOBSON'S
COLLEGIATE SHOE SHOP

ANGELL HALL LOBBY

GAGE LINEN SHOP
is now showing an unusual variety of
Shower and Wedding
..GIFTS...
Handkerchiefs ... Colorful Guest Towels... .
Chiffons . . . Stunning ones Martex Bath Sets
for Sport Wear . . . Bright
Prints . Bridge and Luncheon Sets
10 NICKELS ARCADE
I--. --....rr-...... .. ---w.....T I

I

A Bargain Feslival.
ANNUAL
SPRING CLEARANCE
Continues through Saturday!,
Dresses for Street - Afternoon and Evening
Redingotes - Jacket Frocks - Prints - Knits
Crepes -
Dozens and dozens of exciting Spring Frocks -
everyone good value at its former price. Wide spaced
prints - applique prints - smart sheers - new
bolero and jacket frocks. Sizes 11 to 46 - 1612 to
2612 - Values from $ I0.95 to $29.75.
Suits
Mannish tailors - Swagers - Dressmaker

Shows Foreigyn
Student Needs
The need for adequate help to for-
eign students who find themselves un-
fitted for their academic work be-
cause of lack of facility in the use of
English was stressed by Prof. J. Ra-
leigh Nelson, counselor to foreign
students, in his report for the year
1936-37.
Professor Nelson points out that
foreign students in their first se-
mester in this country are greatly
handicapped by this poor knowledge
of English. To remedy . it he sug-
gests first, systematic testing for
achievement in English before the
academic programs are planned;
second, limiting the elections of stu-
dents in the first semester; and third,
a course in English expertly planned
and taught by the English and speech
departments.
A three-fold increase over last
year in the volume of work done by
the counselor's office in spite of the
fact that the number of foreign stu-
dents has increased only from 288 to
307 is reported by Professor Nelson.
This is due to the fact that the stu-
dents are realizing that the office can
help them in their adjustment to life
in this country, actording to the re-
port.
The various national groups are
drawing together after a period of in-
tense nationalism, Professor Nelson
states. They are again coming to an
appreciation of the possible benefits
of an international club and it is
probable that some organization to
take the place of the former Cosmo-
politan- Club will be needed soon, ac-
cording to the report.
*FIRST CALL
Thousands of employers all over
the country are asking for college
women in their offices. Such wo-
men with secretarial training
have the first call on positions of
trust and responsibility at the
heart of the business. Katharine
Gibbs, in fact, has calls for more
good secretaries than there are
graduates available.
O Address College Course Secretary for
"Results," a booklet of interesting
placement information, and ill ustrated
catalog.
*Special Course for College Women
opens in New York and Boston, Sep-
tomber 21, 1937.

A.M.
7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:30
P.M.
12:30- 1:00
1:00- 2:00
2:00- 3:00
UNIV

Margaret Ann Ayeres.
Bobby Melin.
Mary Johnson.
Margaret Curry.
Betty Gatward.
Jinnie Hunt.
Hope Hartwig.
Margaret Ferries.
Janet Allington.
Angelene Maliszewski.
Joanne Kimmnell.
Helen Purdy.
Betty Strickroot.
VERSITY HALL

A
7:45-
9:00-
10:00-
11:00-:
P
12:30-
2:00-

A.M.
7:45- 9:00 Harriet Pomeroy.
Ruth French.
9:000-10:00 Edith Zerbe.
Gretchen Lehman.
0:00-11:00 Mary Anna Chockly.
Mary Ellen Heitsch.
1:00-12:30 Dorothea Staebler.
Harriet Heath.

1
1'

A.M.
7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:30
P.M.
12:30- 2:00

Walt Kreuger.
John Dahl.
Leon Thermer.
John Johnson.
Bob Rogers.
Henry Alexander.
Don Anderson.
Floyd Allen.
Ruth Dorsey.

P.M.
12:30- 2:00 Lois King.
Charlotte Hamilton.
Margaret Guest.
2:00- 3:00 Charlotte Reuger.
THE MALL
(Between Education & Architec-
ture Schools)
A.M.
7:45- 9:00 Roderick Anderson.
Jerry Weisner.
9:00-10:00 Wes Purkiss.
10:00-11:00 Jane Birely.
Marjorie Tillinghast.
11:00-12:30 Ray Frederick.
P. M.
12:30- 2:00 Bob Wemer.
Betty Keenan.
1:00- 2:00 .Dick Wagner.

romm"Nomm"m

HLL AUDITORIUM
P.M.
8:00- Gus Collatz.
Marshall Sampson.
R. J. Bennet.
The ifollowing are asked to re-
port at the following times at
Lane Hall:
10:00-11:00 Ellen Cuthbert.
11:00-12:00 Jim Bullard.
12:30- 2:00 Betsy Anderson.
1:00- 2:00 Mary Mackenzie.
3:00- 4:00 Harriet Shackleton.

... seen in Vogue
and rper
BEAUTY iii WHITE

11:00 Harold Alder.
Charles Parsons,
12:30 Fred Luebke.
Wallace Bash.
'.M.
2:00 Bernard Rubiner.
Carvel Shaw.
3:00 Elliot Robinson.
Myron Wallace.
WATERMAN GYM

.M.
9:00
10:00

2:00- 2:30 Helen Orvis.
APPOINTS SECRETARY DIE FROM INJURIES
DETROIT, May 13.-(/)-Edward LAPEER, May 13.-(iP)-Donald N.
J. Fry, new State racing commis- Knapp, 23, and Maxine Butler, 18,
sioner, today appointed Robert E. Lo- both of Pontiac, died Thursday of in-
masney as commission secretary. 1 juries suffered Wednesday.
Sort of"H Itsthe Spmot"
These Hot Days-
And You'll Lose None of the Flavor

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Inimitably lovely.., the
trim eyelet tie ... the gay
toelessheelless sandal-
tie (this one also comes
in red, green, or blue),
the sleek little winged
front pump... styles that
wla compIete your new
outfit with distinctior!

types and fur trimns.

Sizes 12 to 3 8.

Coats -
Swagger -- Fitted and Felted types.
Sizes 12 to 20

1
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/I~ J

ait

$6.50 an
$7.50

One-Half Off

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