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May 04, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THlE MICHIGAN DAILY

l[

arsit. Nine Plays Michigan Normal At

PRESS

ANG LE
- r By GEORGE J. ANDR_
(Dal Sports Editor)
Jake's Doing Well.. .
PUSHED from the sport pages of
practically every newspaper by
the herculean efforts of Big Bill Wat-
son, but a real star in his own right,
Jake Townsend, the Big Ten's stand-
out basketball player, is also the sec-
ond most outstanding weight man of
the Conference. The cage captain-
elect's discus toss of nearly 147 feet

Smithers, Gee,Fr
Smith Will See

om Cinders To Boilers In Ten Michigan Net
Easy Lessons --By Bob Osgood Squad Blanks
11rn- Tnum

Cole Hurls Alpha Delts I-M SOFTBALL SCORES
Phi Kappa Psi 11, Alpha Tau
TO 12-5 Win Over Psi U jOmega 10.
Phi Delta Theta 8; Sigma Phi 7.
Russ Cole continued his winning
string yesterday afternoon when he! he allowed Kanna Nu four hits over

Action In Fray
Michigan Seeks Tenth Wini
Of Year; Holds Earlier
Victory Over Hurons
Coach Ray Fisher's championship-!

feet was good only
for an obscure sec-
ond behind Wat-
son's effort of 152
and a fraction Sat-
urday, but at the
same time was be-
tween five and 10
feet better than
winning heaves in

Townsend°

all of the remaining Conference dual
meets held last Saturday. He shot-
put heave of 46 feet three inches
was beaten over the Big Ten only by
47 feet plus efforts of Dom Krezowski
of Minnesota and Hank Bruder of
Illinois. Which doesn't mean that
Townsend will not do better than
fourth in the Big Ten Champicti.
ships. Coaches Charlie Hoyt and
Ken Doherty, believe that with a little
more work to bring greater speed
across the circle, Jake will be doing
49 feet by the time May 21 rolls
around. And his discus work,rhis
main fPrte, is steadily on the up-
grade. It will be a great surprise to
local track followers if Jake does not
exceed 150 feet before too long. In-
cidentally, Watson's throw of 152 feet
four in the discus is the best publicly
announced heave made by a college
man this spring. Sam Francis, Ne-
braska's All-American fullback and
Olympic weight man, did 149 plus at
Drake, and Stanford's perennially
outstanding troupe of strong men are
flirting with 150. Watson's perform-
ance in the shot Saturday alsc
marked him as the man to beat in
this event in the National Collegiates.
At 10:15 Tonight...
Tune your radio to WJR (750 kilo-
cycles) at 10:15 p.m. today and get
the low down on Michigan's baseball
team-maybe. At least, Coach Ray
Fisher and two of his stars, Herm
Fishman and Walt Peckinpaugh, are
to be interviewed by Harry Wismer,
Detroit's up-and-coming sports com-
mentator., ,What they will say, I do
not know-and they don't either.
But I'll guarantee that Harry's ques-
tions will keep Ray and his boys go-
ing. Your editor is also making the
trip, but promises to stay off the air.
By the way, Wismer is bringing quite
a collection of in-season celebrities of
the athletic world to his microphone
during the week at 10:15. Listen in
and you'll hearsome interesting dope
on major leaguers and others.
Strikes-But Not Out...
FROM BILL ELVIN, edit staff try-,
out, comes news of some very

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bound Wolverines will be seekingj
their tenth win out of 13 games when]
they face a weak Michigan Normal3
team at 4 p.m. this afternoon on the
Hurons' home diamond.
Johnny Smithers will get the call'
to start on the mound for Michigan
and will probably be opposed by Fred1
Bailey or Burt Zacher. Today's con-
test will be the first that Smithers
has pitched for the Varsity nine. Burt1
Smith and John Gee will also see
service on the mound during the
game.
Long Practice Held
Gee;and Chuck McHugh held the
Hurons to seven hits and three runs
last Friday while their teammates
were pounding the offerings of Bailey
and Zacher for eight hits and a 12-3
victory in the first meeting between
the two teams.
Fisher put his squad through
lengthy practice session yesterday.1
Chuck McHugh, working on the rub-
ber for the reserves looked good
against the Varsity batters as his fast
ball whipped across the plate in
great shape. "Lefty" Herring, pitch-
ing for the first stringers, also turned
in a capable exhibition. Pete Lisa-
gor led the reserve batting attack by
virtue of his mighty triple.
Frosh Meets Reserves
Herman Fishman, ace lefthander
who has pitched three of the Var-
sity's four Big Ten games, took the
role of umpire in today's practice.
Herm is being groomed to hurl eith-
er against Indiana on Friday or in the
all-important game with Illinois'sl
strong aggregation on Saturday.

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By BETSY ANDERSON that he "just wants to settle down" 4
When Captain Bob Osgood grad- when he graduates. He's thinking of
uates with a mechanical engineering doing his settling in Kansas which is Score Eas 6-0 Victory
degree next February, Coach Hoyt one of the nicest parts of the country I
will be losing one of his most con- in his estimation. The Pacific coast Sherwood And Mills Are
sistent winners and a "swell fellah." runs a close second, and he thinks Extended In Singles
The six feet two bespectacled en- Indianapolis is one of the nicest cities
gineer holds the Big Ten indoor con- around here. Michigan's varsity netters, back
ference record in the 70-yd. high Enjoys School Work from a highly successful road trip,
hurdles ,the school record in the 220- Boiler work, air conditioning and took a visiting Illinois tennis squad in
yd low hurdles, and the Field House heating are the subjects that will stride yesterday by a 6-0 score.
. rf record for the 65-yd. claim the serious minded engineer's Although tired out from three
hurdles. Last year attention when he gets his degree in meets in the last four days they man-
he was a co-holder mechanical engineering and he states aged to win all but two of the matches
f of the world's rec- that he really enjoys school and will in straight sets.
ord for the 120-yd. be sorry to leave.i McCoy Is Tough
high hurdles. Michigan's. hurdler de luxe started Miller Sherwood and Bill Mills,
He was a serious his track career when he began high playing in the number one and two
contender for the jumping in high school and has positions respectively, had the stiff-
American Olympic been going strong ever since. Ohio est opposition. Bill McCoy, playing
Team during the State almost claimed him as he had a pat ball game that somewhat
tryouts at Randall's an application in there a week before cramped Sherwood's style, won the
Island, N.Y. last school started. However, some of his first set of their match 6-4. Sherwood
s uimim e r, but high school teachers who were very came back, however, to take the next
Osgood stumbled into bad enthused Michigan alumni, suggest- two, 6-2, 6-4.
luck when he hit the last hurdle in ed he come up here and look the Mills also found the going tough,
the 400 meter hurdles. He has also campus over. He and some friends dropping his first set to John Schud-
successfully competed in the 120-yd. drove up and when they discovered er 4-6. Both men faulted on the
high hurdles, the 400-yd dash-but that the engineering school had a base line repeatedly in the second set,
one could go on indefinitely with his higher rating and the campus was which Mills finally took 9-7. He won
records which are well known any- more picturesque than O.S.U.'s and the match by capturing the final set
way. heard of the fine athletic facilities, fairly easily, 6-1.
Ignores '40 Olympics the track team had a prospective Tim Twerdal gave Jarvis Dean a
However, the blond Clevelander freshman. little trouble in the second of their
plans to finish his track career this Loves To Play Cards two sets before the latter pulled
year although he adds a tentative, His hobby is cards of any sort- through to a 6-1, 7-5 victory.
"that's what I plan on now" to that preferably bridge or poker and sleep- Flick Wins Easily
statement. And at present, he's not ing is a pastime he rates highly. His Jesse Flick had the easiest going
planning on the '40 Olympics at all, one eccentricity is that he usually of all, defeating Paul Dean in straight
he claims. wears a hat-a habit he picked up sets, 6-1, 6-1.
The 24,000 miles he's traveled in after he lost his freshman "pot" Flick and Dean, teaming up against
his four years of track meets, repre- which he'd donned faithfully each Twerdal and Paul Dean won their
senting Michigan, haven't made a morning when a freshman, doubles match 6-1, 6-4, and Sherwood
wanderer of Bob, because he claims He wears the hatchet of Michi- and Mills won after a bit of a strug-
gamua as well as a Phi Kappa Tau gle from Schuder and McCoy 6-3, 6-4,
Frosh Swimmers emblem and is at present vice-presi- to sweep the meet.
dent of that chapter. He is also a Thursday the Wolverines blanked
Receive Numerals member of Triangles and Vulcans, Wabash College 8-0, Friday rain halt-
honorary engineering societies. ed the last two matches of their meet

pitched Alpha Delta Phi to a 12-51
win over Psi Upsilon. Psi U scored
all of its runs in the first three inn-
ings and led 5 to 2 at the end of the
third. In their half of the fourth, the
Alpha Delts coupled a five-hit bar-
rage with a base on balls and an er-
ror to score six runs and take charge
of the game. Cole allowed six hits
while whiffing ten and walking none.
Jack Palmer, Chi Psi hurler turned;
in another pitching masterpiece when

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Numerals will be awarded.to four-

Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's fresh- teen freshman swimmers, it was an-
men will play an exhibition with the nounced yesterday by the publicity
reserves on the Varsity diamond to- department of the Athletic associa-
day. tion. The complete list follows: Wil-
The probable line-ups for this af- liam F. Pioch, Jr., Detroit; Jack Ro-
ternoon's Varsity game are: ger Wolin, Cleveand,O.; Hal T.rBen-
Michigan Michigan Normal Burke, Belleville, Mich.; Jahn W.
Brewer, ss Walsh, 2b Creighton, Hastings, Nebraska; Nel-
Peckinpaugh, 3b Walker, 3b son J. Davis, Pontiac; Malcolm John
Beebe, c Scripter, If Lang, Lakewood, O.; Lawrence Luo-
Uricek, 2b Todd, ss to, Gardner, Mass.: Edward Ely
Kremer, cf Garlan, lb Mack, Jr., Glencoe, Ill.; Douglas B.
Smick, lb Good, cf McFarland, Tenafly, N. J.; Ellis V.
Campbell, rf Weaver, rf Marcus, Flushing, L. I., N. Y.; Rich-
Heyliger, If Bartling, c ard A. McClurg, Chicago; and Jack
Smithers, p Bailey, p Sherrill, Evanston, Ill.

Peckinpaugh
To Emulate
As Maor L

HopeS
Father
Gea gfer

with Purdue, which they also won
hands down, 7-0, and Saturday they
rode over a weak Iowa quartet, who,
after losing all their singles, defaulted
in the doubles.

J ~ -. -'big pair of hands, an invaluable asset
in his position, a fine arm, and good
By BUD BENJAMIN coordination and rhythm-all of
Guarding the hot corner for Mich- which combine to make him a veri-

classy bowling turned in over the
week-end by George Kielyasser, man-
ager of the Michigan Recreation al-
leys on East Liberty. Bowling on his
home grounds Saturday, George
chalked up a 421.5 average in 14
consecutive. games. In the course
of this performance he included
consecutive three-game total of
834.21 strikes in a row-and two
perfect (300) games. Yesterday}
George bowled another 300, the fifth
in, his life and the first since 1932.
Whew!

Buckeyes To Renew Old Cinder
Rivalry In Dual Meet Saturday
The Buckeyes of Ohio State, boast- against Wisconsin Saturday he placed
ing as headline attraction, Capt., fourth behind Squires and Blickle,
Chuck Beetham, Dave Albritton and two other Ohio runners, and Mehl
Mel Walker, will renew an ancient of the Badgers.
track rivalry Saturday afternoon with With Ohio presenting such power
a great Michigan team on Ferry Field in the 880 this race promises to be a
in the hopes of doing the impossible real battle, for Ben Starr, Howard
--beating this Wolverine aggregation; Davidson and Ed DeVine are cap-
in a dual engagement. able of giving the Bucks as much
So far this year Coach Chuck competition as any other trio half
Hoyt's powerful squad has had little milers in the Big Ten.
brouble in turning back all opposition, Ol1io will present a pair of excel-
last week's 81-50 triumph over In- lent distance runners in Sexton and
diana overshadowing all earlier tri- Whittaker while Howells, Blickle.
umphs thSquires and Beetham will battle for
Ohio State probably has a better the points in the 440 and 880. Lewis
dual meet team than the Hoosiers leads the Buck sprinters and after,
although it is not expected that the his :21.6 victory in the 220 against
Buckeyes will place as high in the Wisconsin will be favored to cop thatI
Conference meet May 21 and 22 as event here and may push Sammy
will Indiana. The explanation lies Stoller in the century.
in the fact that the Buckeye team
is far better\ balanced than the;
Hoosiers, especially in the field eventsTG
where the Wolverines practically shutT e
out Indiana, with the final result be-
ig that the Bucks may give Michi-
gan something of a scrap Saturday. 3-Speed English Bicycles
Beetham Returns 712 E. Washington Ph. 9793
Walker and Albritton, the latter co-
holder of the world's record in the
high jump at 6 feet 93/4 inches, -
should handle the high jump with
their customary ease. Beetham, na- onfidenM
tional intercollegiate champion in
the half mile, will also be expected
to capture that event although like to
* - .'.- r

igan's baseball forces this year is
Walter Peckinpaugh, Cleveland pro-1
duct, and son of the ex-manager of
the Cleveland Indians.7
Being thus imbued with a back-
ground of baseball tradition, the
young sophomore has proceeded to
carve his own niche out on the dia-
mond. And he means to continue
peddling his own papers.
Naturally one so close to the na-
tional pastime would cherish ambi-
tions of rising to the top therein. Wal-1
ter is no exception. He is one of
those rabid baseball "eggs"-one who
sleeps, eats, talks, and lives under
the shadow of horsehide and blud-!
geon.
His long suit is along defensive;
lines. In competition this year, only
one error has been charged against;
him-an especially imposing feat for'
a third sacker. He is blessed ,with a

table fielding gem.
His hitting has him worried a bit.
During the spring trip in the South,
he pounded the apple for a cool .360
average, falling behind only Merle
Kremer in this department. At pres-
ent, his average has fallen slightly
below the charmed .300 circle, but it
should pick up as the season con-
tinues.
During the summer Walter plays
sandlot ball for the Fisher Foods of
Cleveland, a triple A nine, and hold-
ers of the National Amateur Baseball
crown. He expects to continue along
this line this summer.
If Walter ever breaks into the big
time, which is his big aim right now,
it will necessitate a lot of work, espe-
cially in his hitting. A hard worker,
a real plugger, and a genuine baseball
enthusiast, he stands a good chance
of making the grade.

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Injury Will Keep Golf
Captain From State Tilt

11

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Due to a muscle injury received
while shooting an eagle on the 18th;
hole of last Saturday's match with
Ohio State to score a 69, Captain Al
Saunders of the golf team may not
be able to play Wedpesday against
Michigan State.
Although the injury was almost un-
noticeable Saturday it kept Saunders
from practice yesterday when he felt
it irritating him. Examination by
a doctor showed a pulled muscle in
his side.
Captain Saunders will probably be
in condition to make the trip to Il-
linois for the team's third Big Ten
meet but will need to rest and bake
his side during the week.

Spring C
is
w y
f

Clothes of

Quality and 'Distinction

Tropical Weight
SUITS
Wagners are featuring
two summer weight fab-
rics, one the "Coolkenny"
a fabric that holds its
press in sultry, hot wea-
ther, is found in grey and
brown with wide chalk
checks. $16.75.

I STROH'S
PABST BLUE RIBBON
FRIAR'S ALE
.4t All Dealers
J. J. O'KANE, Dist. Dial 3500

)d.a

wear

Worsted-
Tex !
Clothes
$40
The Saxon-
Weave
$35

~UUUE EEUUKE p u pp.* p.* * M EDN UU UDNE ug EUU U s

The other "Sea Breeze" a
tropical worsted fabric
that has coolness and
summer comfort written
all over it. It is found in
light grey blue and brown
with or without a soft
chalk line.
$20

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Get the world's good news daily through
THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
An International Daily Newspaper
PublidVd by
THE CHRISTIAN SCIEPCE PUBLISHING SOCIETY
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Regular reading of THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR is
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for the home. It is 5 cents a copy, or 3 cents a day on sub-

The Town-weave $30
Town-weave is a suit of clothes
of quality, excellent fabrics that
wear well-careful needle work,
perfect fit and tasteful, gentle-
manly styling.
THE DOWNTOWN STORE
FOR MICHIGAN MEN

$1,00
GOLF SOX
Wool ankle sox in bright colors
and plain white .
Two for $1.00

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