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April 28, 1937 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-04-28

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SAX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEI3: ICSI)AYt A, RIL 28, 1937

SIX WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28, 1937

AI-State Band
To Give First
Concert Here
High School Club To Play
April 30; Championship
Debate Is Same Time
The Michigan All-State Senior
High .School Band will make its in-
itial public appearance as a part of
the program of the Annual State
Championship Debate in Hill Audi-
trium, April 30, it was announced
yesterday by Dr. William P. Halstead,
manager of the Michigan High School
Forensic Association and member of
the University Speech department.
Harold Bacnman, of Chicago, will
conduct the concert, assisted by high
school band directors. Mr. Bachman
was the director of Pershing's Head-
quarters Band in France during the
World War. This band became
known as the "Million Dollar Band"
because of Pershing's remark that its
effect on the morale of the men was
worth a million dollars to him.
Mr. Bachman conducts the band
at the University of Chicago, and has
given special courses at the Univer-I
sity of Idaho, University of Kansas,
and Northwestern University. He
will take part in the program of the
music section of the Michigan School-
masters' Club, and will return to
Michigan for a special week's en-
gagement this summer.'
The band concert will start at 7:30
p.m., and will be followed by the State
Championship- Debate at 8:15 p.m.
the Program of the concert includes:
"Sir Galahad Overture" by Hildreds
"Pride of the Wolverine" by Sousa,
"Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring" by
Bach, "Vanished Army" by Afford,
"Under the Double Eagle" by Wag-'
nei; "Rampage of the Old Grey
Mare" by Stacy, "March of Youth" by
Olividatti and "The Victors" by El-
bel
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
in Room 3065 at 7:30 p.m., Thursday,
April 29.
Information regarding the work at
the field station will be given. Mr.
Rigg, president of Sigma Gamma
Epsilon, a national geological frater-
nity, will give a student's impression
of last summer's field experiences.
Moving pictures in color will be
shown.
Others interested in the work at
the station are invited to attend.
G. M. Ehiers, Director, Sum-
mer Field Courses.
Weekly Reading Hour: The pro-
gram for Thursday, April 29, at 4
p.m. in Room 205 Mason Hall, will
consist of a recital from Macbeth
to be given by Mary J. Atlee, Mar-
garet Brackett, and Raymond Sho-
berg. The public is cordially invited.
Swimming, Women Students: All
those who signed up for swimming at
9 . a.m. on Tuesday and Thursday
mornings and any others interested
are asked to report at the Union Pool
at 9 a.m. Thursday morning, April
29, without fail.
French Plays: The Cerle Francais
presents this year three one-act
plays: "La Farce du Cuvier" (anony-
mous), "L'Ecole des Belles-Meres" by
Brieux and "Un Client Serieux" by
Courteline. The cast of the latter
play is composed of members of the
Department of Romance Languages.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, Fri-
day, April 30, at 8:30 o'clock. Tickets
at the box-office Thursday and Fri-
day.

Aeronautical Engineers, I Ae.S.:
The first annual dinner meeting of
the University of Michigan Student
Section of the Institute of the Aero-
nautical Sciences will be held Thurs-
day evening, April 29, at the Michi-
gan Union. T. P. Wright of the Cur-
tiss-Wright Corporation, a national
officer of the Institute, will be the
speaker of the evening. His talk
will be, "Aeronautics-A Brief Sur-
vey."
Anyone interested is invited to at-
tend, and tickets for the dinner
should be purchased as soon as pos-
sible from any of* the local officers.
Graduate Students in History: To
meet the members of the History
Department faculty and wives, the
graduate students in History will give
a tea at the Michigan Union, Sun-
day, May 9, from 3 to 5 p.m.
Tickets may be obtained by stu-
dents at the desk in the Union or
from Clark Norton, Arnold Price, Stu-
art Portner, Louis Doll, or Miss Isa-
belle Fisk. The price is 25 cents.
Scandinavian Club: The Scandi-
navian Club will meet at 8 p.m. this
Thursday, April 28, at the Union to
discuss plans for a picnic and a pro-
gram. The room number will be
posted on the Union bulletin board.
Lutheran Student Choir: Special
rehearsal for the whole choir, Fri-

Necessity For I
Anti-Trust Law
Revision S e e n
WASHINGTON, April 27.-(o)-
Attorney General Cummings reported
to President Roosevelt today the time
had come for a revision of the anti-'
trust laws to prevent monopolistic
practices.
The report, read by PresidentE
Roosevelt at a press conference, also
said the justice department's investi-
gation of compalints of alleged col-j
lusion in bidding on government steel
contracts had produced insufficient
evidence to warratn action by that
department.
Instead, the report raised the
question of whether the matter
should not be handled at this junc-
ture through cease and desist orders
by the Federal Trade Commission.
The report said identical steel bids,
complained of about a year ago by
Secretary Ickes in connection with
public works .contracts, were produced
in part by the basing point system of
price determination.
It said the whole queqstion of the
adequqacy of the anti-trust laws
arose during the study and added the
time had come for a restatement of
the laws.
It recommended a committee be
appointed to study the desirability of

Spring Storm Whips Sioux Falls, S. D.

I WPA SUTRVE Y MADE
Wheat Farmter Takes Greater iLANSING, April 27,-{i-A sur-
vey completed recently by the state
Chance Than tcu WPA showed 58,124 persons employed
on work relief projects.
"Oh, God, give us rain." turned to its former position of ay poaton,e aexharrowed to prevent
The fervent and desperate prayer grazing land." This land stores up enough mois-
of the Western wheat farmer may This western farm country should ture to grow a crop the next year.
sound strange in the Ann. Arbor resi- not as a permanent policy be stripped Thus part of the land always lies fal-
dent's ear, but on the flimsy hope of of its grass covering in order to farm Low f po e a aroy. ies ia-
rain the Great Plains wheat farmer wheat, he said. Real estate specula- la m for next years crop. The wind
engages in a venture that makes stocktr nftehpaf ha orue trnms for which the West is noted
c tors and the hope of wheat fortunes have an easy time blowing away this
market gambling seem a safe bet, ac- are responsible for the vast immigra- plowed earth into fine dust particles
cording to Prof. Preston E. James of tion of wheat farmers westward, Pro- that blind your eyes and make you
the geography department. fessor James continued. choke-and devastate the crops that
A variable climate and wind ero- War Prices Caused Migration are growing.
Sion aggravated by a dry farming The story of the westward move- Sixty-five per cent of the Great
ailu in the Great lains region, ment into the Great Plains of wheat Plains region is damaged by the wind
he said. This region extends from farms begins shortly before the erosion, and 15 per cent is severely
Canada to Texas and cuts through World War, he explained. Deficien- damaged, Professor James said.
the western parts of Kansas and Ne- cies in the world market during the And the farmers continue to pray
braska. World War and a few years of humid for and bet on rain.
22 Years At $35 A Year 'climate gave promise to those wes- Talk about Wall Street!
How much o a gamble wheat tern immigrants of continued large
farming really is in these western yields of wheat for export, he said. TYPEWRITERS

- Associated Piress Photo
The.se motorists had to get out and dig when their car beacame stalled
huge drifts mear Sioux FaiL, 8,1D., in the state's worst spring blizzard
years.

in
in

_ .

lands can be seen in the fact that
for 22 years an average wheat farm
in a county of Western Kansas pro-
duced an income of $35 per year. In
the one other year, in a 23 year per-
iod, the income from the same av-
erage farm gave its owner $20,472.
"The only permanent policy which
can be applied in these areas," Pro-
fessor James explained, "is one of
government subsidies to help theI
farmers, or a shift of about one-third!
of the present population out of this
region. Then he land could be re-

For a few years the farmer enjoyed
a period of humidity in a climate
whose fickleness makes it impossible
to predict the rainfall. Around 1916
the climate reversed itself as it has
always done periodically, Professor
James explained. Many farmers, he
said, were ruined, others managed
to survive by heavily mortgaging
their farms. One lesson of this bit-
ter experience was the introduction
of a dry farming technique.
Dry farming consists in letting
part of the crop lands lie fallow, care-

All makes and models,
Bought, Sold, Rented,
Exchanged, Repaired.
314 SOUTH STATE STREET
REMAINDER
OF THE WEEK
LADIES' TOPLIFTS .... 15c

Three Minutes Needed By Boys
To Spot A Line, Hullaballoo Says

amendments to improve enforce-
ment.{
Architecture Fraternity
To Initiate Tomorrow
Tau Sigma Delta, honorary fra-
ternity for architecture and the al-c
lied arts, will initiate 11 members to-
morrow night at the Union, it was,
announced yesterday by Philip Hau-
.hey, '37A, president of the organiza-
tion.
Those who will be taken into mem-
bership include Helen Shapland, '37A,
Berta Knudson, '38A, Florence Mc-j
Conkey, '38A, Delos Seeley, Grad.,
Charles Anderson, '37A, Emory Le-
land, '37A, Chester Moy, '38A, Stew-I
art Van Keuren, '38A, John Vander-(
Meulen, '38A, Harry Morris, '39A, and
Nai Jen Chien, Spec.
Membership in Tau Sigma Delta isI
based upon scholarship and creative1
ability and originality

If a girl has a line the average boy
will recognize it within three min-
utes .and unless it is a good one, the
conversation will end in four minutes,
according to a campus survey con-
ducted by the 'Iulane Hullaballoo.
Different campus Casanovas when
approached on the subject agreed
that there were three major types of
lines. The first, and worst, is the
hero worship type---"Oh you great
big wonderful man." combined with
the clinging vine type-"protect me."

tory female on the trail of some un-
suspecting male is the antithesis of
the above type, "I am a sensation."
The usual approach to this type of
line is "Guess who I was out with
last night?" Type (a) of this grou;
is the gal who tells about her date
with the campus big shot, while type
(b) tells where she went but veils
the name of the unlucky man in mys-
tery. (N. B. It usually turns out that
she couldn't get where she professes
to have gone if she were a combina-
tion of Greta Garbo and Loretta
Young and her date were a combina-

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."""""""""""""""""""""""""
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MEN'S OAK LEATHER
HALF SOLES.........
Men's Oak Leather Soles
and Rubber Heels.
Men's Leather and
Rubber Heels ....,.... .

75e
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NO NALS
All Soles Sewed On-
White Shoes Cleaned .... 15c
Zippers and Zipper Jackets
Repaired
Shoe Repair
516 E. Williams

Another high ranking line used tion of John D. Rockefeller and Rob-
when the girl is "on the make" is ert Taylor), the Hullabaloo says.
the inferiority complex type-"Oh no, If you recognize your type here,
I hardly ever go anywhere, I'm so un- girls, it's time for a change, because
the Tulane Casanovas say they are
popular," according to the Hullabal- all definitely trite, and agree with
loo. I Dorothy Dix in advising, "Just be na-
Next in popularity with the preda- tural, girls," the Hullaballoo advises.

NMmNe.... . .. . .....NUUE ..NE ... 3.

,, w,

"

w

0#
(:9U

In the Big Town, you see lots of empty
packages. That means that pack after
pack of refreshingly mild, good tasting
Chesterfields have satisfied hundreds .. .

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