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April 25, 1937 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-04-25

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i1Vi% i: Y, Pr iL ? , I937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDALY, APRIL 25, 1937

____________________________________________________________________ - -I

4 W omen In Philadelphia Symphony
Prove Orchestra Ca reers A re Possible

_ _______- ~i

The 44th Annual

NOTICES

May

Festival

Brilliant programs interpreted by outstanding per-
sonalities in the world of music have been planned.
This is your opportunity to hear artists of world-wide
recognition.

ARTISTS____

KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD.
ELISABETH RETHBERG
MARION TELVA ..... .
ARTHUR CARRON.

Soprano
. Soprano
Contralto
... Tenor

LAURITZ MELCHIOR ..... Tenor
CARLO MORELLI ...... Baritone

EZIO PINZA .

Bass

and
JOSEPH KNITZER ......Violinist
EUGENE LIST ........... Pianist
PALMER CHRISTIAN . .Organist

GROUPS

The

PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EUGENE ORMANDY and
JOSE ITURBI, Conductors

Feminine Members Have
Secured Positions In
String Selection
Four women in the Philadelphia
Symphony Orchestra have proved
that it is possible for women to have
careers with a famous symphony or-
chestra.
The four women, however, con-
tinually have more than 100 men es-
corts so that their careers apparently
do not become boring.
They have won their positions in
the string section, one as a violon-
cellist, one as a violinist and two as
harpists,
Edna Phillips, recognized as one
of the outstanding harpists in the
country apparently proves that a
woman can have a career and yet be
a successful wife and mother. Off
stage, she is Mrs. Samuel R. Rosen-
baum, wife .of the vice-president of
the orchestra's board of directors.
She has a daughter now two years
old, who acts as the mascot of the
orchestra when n tour, with the
present tour being the second in
which she has accompanied her
mother.
Miss Phillips started her music
lessons on the piano at the age of
seven. At 14, she took up the harp
as accessory to the piano. After
three years with Florence Wightman
she enrolled at the Curtis Institute
under Carlos Salzedo. Three years
later she joined the Philadelphia
Symphony.
Marjorie Tyre is the second harp-
ist of the Philadelphia Symphony.
She and Miss Phillips make up the
entire harp section of the orchestra.
Besides her orchestra work, she
teaches and heads the harp depart-
ment of the Zechwer-Hahn Conserv-
atory. She also does solo work and
plays a recital every year.
Elsa Hilger, the woman cellist of
the Philadelphia Symphony, was
well known on the concert stage be-
fore she turned to playing in a sym-
Ormandy Tells
Of Conducting
Youth Concerts
(Continued From Page 9)
back the following year for a whole
week. This .engagement seemed to
have left a favorable reaction, too,
o when Maestro Arturo Toscanini
took ill in 1931, and cabled his can-
cellation of his two weeks guest en-
gagement in Philadelphia, I was the
fortunate one to be called upon to
take his place during these two weeks
-at which time I established myself
also with the regular season audi-
ences, who also seemed to like me
and was engaged to return the fol-
lowing year as regular guest conduc-
tor, annual engagements lasted until
my appointment as conductor. It
might interest you to know that while
I was taking Arturo Toscanini's place
in Philadelphia ,Henry Verbrugghen,.
conductor of the Minneapolis Sym-
phony Orchestra, suddenly took ill,
and I was called upon to take his
place for one week as guest conduc-
or. The reaction in Minneapolis
seemed to be similar to the one in
Philadelphia, and when the doctors
announced Mr. Verbrugghen's in-
ability ever to conduct again, I was
signed up as the regular conductor.
I was five years in Minneapolis, close-
ly associated with the student body
of the University of Minnesota and
established the Young People's Con-
certs there, which during the last
three years were over-sold-filling a
house of over five thousand seats.
Through my contact with the Youth,
I made myself a lot of friends among
the student body. I had also been
touring with the Minneapolis Sym-

KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD

phony orchestra. With her two sis-
ters, Maria and Greta, as the Hilger
Trio, she gave concerts the world
over.
Miss Hilger was born in Prague,
Czechoslovakia, starting her music
career early. As a girl of nine, she
played with the Vienna Phi lhar-
monic, Lotte Lehmann before a dis-
tinguished audience rendering the
Volkmann Cello Concerto. Her
teacher had been taken sick and she
substituted for him on one day's no-
tice.
Lois Pulitzer has the honor of be-
ing one of the few women violinists
in a major symphony orchestra. Her
accomplishments also include recitals
on the concert stage. Miss Pulitz, who
hails from Hollywood, was sent at
73 to the Curtis Institute in Phi-la-
Festival Vocalists

Conductor Declares Ladies
Comiion In European
Organizations
delphia to study by Walter Henry
Rothwell, conductor of the Los An-
geles Symphony, who had noticed her
talent. She has studied with Carl
Flesch and Efrem Zimbalist.
Miss Pulitz has managed, too, like
Miss Phillips, a successful combina-
tion of marriage and career. In pri-
vate life, she is the wife of Sylvan
Levyn, conductor and vocal teacher.
"Women in orchestras in Europe
are not unusual," says Eugene Or-
mandy, dynamic 37-year-old con-
ductor of the Philadelphia Symphony
Orchestra. "The Stockholm orches-
tra, which I conducted several times,
has twelve ladies. The war marked a
turning point in Europe in the at-
titude toward women players. Many
men musicians went off to fight,
leaving vacancies in the orchestras.
It was natural for women to take
their places. Art is for everybody.
The women in the Philadelphia are
artists par excellence."
Carlo Morelli
Happy To Sing
At Alma 1ater
(Continued From Page 9)
orothers) were beginning to pall. He
felt that he could learn to sing if he
wanted to, and hie decided that he
did. He returned to his native Chile
to study under the same teacher that
had prepared his brothers.
He started his musical education
in 1920 with Maestro Angelo Querze
in Valparaiso. Early in 1921 they
both came to New York and Mr.
Morelli found himself a teacher-stu-
dent-interpreter. He assisted Mr.
Querze until his death when the
pupils prevailed upon Mr. Morelli to
carry on the work. He tried it for
a time and then decided to give it
up and devote himself to the cultiva-
tion of his operative abilities. He then
went to Italy to study under the fa-
mous Signor Tanara.
Signor Tanara prepared the young
baritone for 10 leading roles and saw
him make his debut Dec. 19, 1922,
at the Teatro Municipale in Ales-
sandria, Italy, in the role of Tonio in
'"Pagliacci."
Success followed in every lyric the-
atre of importance in Italy, among
which were La Scala, Milan, in seven
seasons under Toscanini and Pan-
izza; the Communale, Bologna; the
Royal Opera, Rome; the Regio, Tur-
in; and the Fenice, in Venice.
Engagements followed in Ger-
many, Switzerland, Austria, Spain,
Cuba, England and North and South
America.
His unrivaled reportory of 59 roles
in six languages attest to his oper-
atic mind.
Jose Iturbi Calls Tour
'Venture In Idealism'
(Continued From Page 9)
ances, both as conductor and soloist.
"As a concert artist, it has long
been my privilege to observe the real
love of music springing up all over
America, to enjoy the enthusiastic
appreciation of music lovers for the
efforts of a solo artist. It was truly
inspiring. In my career as a con-
ductof, I find it possible to come even
closer to my ideal of bringing great
music to the people, on a larger scale.
Tonight, we set out to visit many of
the leading cities of the United
States and Canada, and to play for
them the great masterpieces of music.
I am proud to have a part in such
an undertaking."

pants as necessity may require.

Tickets are

sold at purchasers' risks, and if lost, mislaid,
or destroyed in any manner, the University
Musical Society will not assume responsibility,
nor will duplicates be issued.
Concerts will begin on Eastern Standard time.
Evening conecrts at 8:30 and afternoon con-
certs at 2:30.
Holders of season tickets are requested to
detach the proper coupon for each concert and
present for admission (instead of the whole
ticket).
Concerts will begin on time, and doors will
be closed during numbers. Late comers will
be required to wait until admitted.
Lost and found articles should be inquired
for at the office of Shirley W. Smith, Vice-
President and Secretary of the University,
University Hall. .,.
Those who leave the Auditorium during
intermission will be required to present their
ticket stubs in order to re-enter.
Traffic regulations will be enforced by the
Ann Arbor Police Department and the Building
and Grounds Department of the University.
For obvious reasons, notices will not be
announced from the stage.
Rehearsals are private, and listeners will not
be admitted.
An art exhibition will be conducted in
Alumni Memorial Hall during the Festival.
The Steinway is the official piano of the
University Musical Society.
SEASON TICKETS

The right is reserved to make such changes
in the programs or in the personnel of partici-

The

UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor

TheJ

YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL
CHORUS
JUVA HIGBLE, Conductor

ELIZABETH RETHBERG

for six concerts by "Stars,"-
chestra, are $3.00, $4.00,
holding "Festival" coupons;
and $8.00 for others.

Choruses, and Or-
$5.00, for those
and $6:00, $7.00,

The prices. of the individual concert tickets
will be $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, and $2.50.
SEND COUPON TODAY

CHORAL WORKS,

AIDA ..................

Verdi

THE SEASON .........Eric Fogg
SPRING RAPTURE .., Harvey Gaul
PARSIFAL (Excerpt) Wagner

MR. CHARLES A. SINK
ANN ARBOR, MICH.

.Enclosed find remittance of $.............. a ... for ..
May Festival Tickets, as follows:

The University Musical Society expresses its gratitude
to an ever-loyal and faithful public. The Society
hopes that the 1937 Festival will meet with the same
enthusiastic approval that has been accorded it in
the past.

MARION TELVA
phony Orchestra annually for five
years, and during my tours we al-
ways included visits to eight or ten
universities.
My relations with Leopold Stokow-
ski are the happiest. He has been
very kind to me ever since I started
to conduct in Philadelphia as guest
conductor, and we are on the best
possible terms.
Looking forward to my Ann Arbor
visit, and with my greetings to the
Youth of Ann Arbor, I am
Very cordially yours,
Eugene Ormandy.

SEASON TICKETS
Number:
(Six Concerts)
......at $8.00 each $.......
......at $7.00 each $.........
...at $6.00 each $.........
Notice - If Festival Coupon is
exchanged, the above prices are
reduced to $3.00, $4.00 and $5.00
respectively.

SINGLE CONCERTS
Number:
......Wed. Eve, at $......
......Thurs. Eve. at $......
......Fri. Aft. at $......
......Fri. Eve. at $......
......Sat. Aft. at $......
......Sat. Eve. at $......

PLEASE WRITE PLAINLY

Name................. ...

... Street ..................

City ......................

.......... State........ .....,

I..

The

Philadelphia

Orchestra

Playing It's Second Great Ann Arbor Engagement

The

193 7

May

Festival

JOSE ITURBI is well known in Ann
Arbor as a pianist. At the Festival
he will appear in the role of conduc-
tor. His success in this field has been
equally phenomenal. During the past
year he has definitely supplemented
his career as piano virtuoso by ac-
cepting numerous orchestra engage-
ments.

EUGENE ORMANDY is known as
the "dynamo of music." Audi-
ences thrill with his magnetic pres-
ence, and the superlative vitality of
his genius. As conductor of the
Philadelphia Orchestra, he has more
than surpassed the expectations of
a highly critical public.

, t I

i

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