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April 09, 1937 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-04-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

x RHJ) Y, APRIL 9, 1937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 1931

Stage Sit-Down In N. J. Graveyard

Gliding Offers

Engineers Protest

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Sights Plane Wreck

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Cheap Answer Doubt Of Virilityi
fCProtesting the charge that their
To l ht Cost g "virility" has been "overestimated,"
the engineers yesterday accused that
the lawyers, failing in their plot to
Local Glider Club Is Best steal the "traditional" slide rule,;
car lier Ofun Iv estfooled themselves with a sham-a!
Instructed Of University paste-board relic-long since relegat-
Groups, Thoren Says ed to the dusty Union atic.
It seems, the engineers said, that
two lawyers, tipped off by their "in-
Gliding has already supplied one sd a"i h normvdte
answer to the demand for inexpen- side man" in the Union, removed the
sire flying, according to Rudolph paste-board replica of the real slide
Thoren, instructor in the aeronau- rule from the Union attic where it
tical engineering school and only has reposed since last year's dance,
faculty member of the Glider Club. having been used at that time as part
Inherently safer than powered of the decoration scheme.
planes, the gliders can be brought_
out of a stall in at least one third frequently made flights of over half
the distance required in the case of an our f there.
airpane, hepoited ut.Gliding is a preliminary to flight
airplanes, he pointed out. . instruction and is very valuable in
The fact that the cost of flying developing independence in the stu-
gliders is so much less than any other dent, for no dual instruction is given,
kind of flying has made the sportdetfrnouaisrcinisgv,
kmdy populyraonghastmdenthspcolMr. Thoren explained. The student
very popular among students at col- starts off by being towed only a
leges in general and especially at few feet above the ground and after
Michigan, he said. The Glider Clubfwe to e ther hintereI
here acordig t Mr.Thoenis learning to handle the ship there isl
here. according to Mr. Thoren, s graduated into gentle turns at higher
conceded to be the most active and altitudes before being released from
best instructed group among Amer- the tow rope. He also gets a feel
At Elmire mecca for glider pilots for the ship which power pilots do not
in this country, the club members achieve for many hours, he said.
won the Sherman Fairchild trophy Men who have flown airplanes for.
in its class last year with a flight any length of time can rarely be per-
of about an hour and a half. This suaded to try gliding, frankly admit-
year they will again compete there, ting that they are afraid to fly with-
and in various other dual meets. out a motor infront, he said.
These meets -have proved popular,' NO DIFFERENCE'
for Mr. Thoren explained, it requires'F
very little practice to become profi- WASHINGTON, April 8.-(I)-
cient at gliding. Rep. Albert J. Engel, Republican of
A tow car usually provides original Lake City told the House today he,
speed to enable the gliders to take could see no legal differences be-
ofl, he said. In this way altitudes tween a worker who is "standing up
of about 500 feet have been obtained, and working" and one who is "sitting;
and flights of about ten minutes in down and refusing to work."
duration have been accomplished.

Three Faculty
Men Will Talk
On Centennial
Three members of the faculty dur-
ing the Spring Vacation will outline
in eight states plans for the Univer-
sity's celebration in June of its hun-
dredth anniversary in Ann Arbor.
Prof. Carl G. Brandt of the speech
department, director of the celebra-
tion, will visit nine Ohio and Penn-
sylvania cities :nciuding Erie, Steu-
benville, Pittsburgh, Canton, Akron,
Youngstown, Columbus and Toledo.
At the same time Prof. Henry C.
Anderson, director of student alumni
relations, will speak to groups in Chi-
cago, Milwaukee, Appleton, Wis., Au-
rora, Ill., the "Tri-Cities," Davenport,
Rock Island and Moline and Peoria.
The third speaker will be Shirley
W. Smith, vice-president and secre-
tary of the University. He will cover
Fort Wayne, Elkhart, South Bend,
LaPorte, Gary, Indianapolis and
Evansville, all in Indiana, and Louis-
ville, Ky., and Memphis, Tenn.
T. Hawley Tapping, general secre-
tary of the alumni association will
discuss plans for the celebration with
California alumni.
Tours & Cruins
ENGLAND, FRANCE, GE RMA1NY, Etc.
iev ,,boutand Sran R \~aonsCW Phone. 641.

- Associated Press Photo
Six burials were delayed in North Arlington, N. J., when 45 grave
diggers sat down in a sympathy strike for 10 general laborers seeking
a wage increase at Holy Cross cemetery. Here are a half dozen of the
strikers sitting beside an open grave and tombstones. When they refused
to return to their jobs it became necessary to place bodies of six persons
in a receiving vault.

- Associated Press Photo
Maj. A. D. Smith who piloted the
searching plane that located the
wreckage of the missing Douglas
airliner on an eastern Arizona
mountainside, is shown later in a
dressing gown at Albuquerque' N.
M., as he gave a ground party di-
rections for reaching the scene.
DA NCE
MICHIGAN UNION
FRIDAY NIGHT

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

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Steamer
Specialist o"'- ' ;
G .4k, 6 Ocean-
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU
601L HURON ST.. ANN ARBOR. MICM.

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8:30-HIl Kemp's Orch.
9:00-Hollywood Hotel.
10:30-Musical.
10:30-Favorite Melodies.
10:45-Vocals by Verrill.
11:15-This Week in Review.
11 :45-Wismer Sports.
11:50-Jay Freeman's Orch.
Midnight-Marvin Frederic's Orch.
12:30-Leon Belasco's Orch.
1 :00-Sigm Off.
WWJ-920 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:00-Ty Tyson's Sports.
6 :10-Dinner Musi..
6 :30-Bradcast.
6:40-Odd Facts.
6:45-Musical Moments.
7:00-Amos 'n' Andy.
7:15-Voice of Carelessness.
7 .20-Evening Melodies.
7:30-Dudley Brothers.
7:45-Caballeros.
8:00-Lucille Manners.
9:00--Waltz Time.
9:30-True Story. Hour.
10:00-First Nighter.
10:30-Pontiac Varsity Show.
11:00-Webster Hall Orchestra.
11:30-"Northern Lights."
12:00-Northwood Inn Orch.
Midnight-Northwood Inn Orch.
12 :30-Weather.
WXYZ--1240 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:30-Day in Review.
6:45-Lowell Thomas.
7:00-Baseball Extra.!
7:15-To Be Announced.
7:30-The Lone Ranger.
8:00-Irene Rich.
8:15-Singin' Sam.
8:30-Death valley Days.
8:45-Michigan T B Association.
9:00-Universal Rhythm.
9:30-Twin Stars.
10:00-Girl Scouts 25th Birthday.
10:30-Lowry Clark.
11:00-Don Bestor.
11.:30-Phil Levant.
Rumba Orchestra Call
Given By Mimes Players

saans

OW

Conditions around Ann Arbor are
not exceptional for gliding , for there
are no strongly defined upcurrents
upon which gliders can depend to!
gain altitude after cutting loose from
j the tow car, he explained. The dune
country along Lake Michigan, how-
ever, is excellent for gliding, he con-
tinued.{
University Librarianj
Leaves For New York
Dr. William W. Bishop, University
librarian, will leave tomorrow for
New York City to attend a one-day
meeting of the American National
Committee on International Intel-
lectual Cooperation, it was announced
yesterday.
The committee, which meets quar-
terly, is headed by Prof. James T.
Shotwell of Columbia University.
Prominent Alumnus
Dies In Canadaigua
Word has been received here of the
death yesterday of Robert F. Thomp-
son, '92L, justice of the appellate
division of the New York Supreme
Court and a prominent University
alumnus.
Judge Thompson was active in the

IM SE

1

6x

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458 READ THE WANT ADS

Mimes, men's honorary dramatic Glee Club alumni association. He
society, has secured a juggler, a ma- died in Canandaigua, N.Y.
gician, a "strip artist," impersonators
and chorus men for their Michigras
presentation, but still does not have l
a complete rumba orchestra. DA N C E
Violinists, base fiddlers, mandolin MICHIGAN UNION
players and accordianists are request-
ed to report at 5 p.m. Monday, April F RI DAY N IGHT
19, at the Union or to call Louis S.
Goldberg, '37, executive director of
the Mimes Michigras presentation.
BOOK COLLECTION GIVEN
A collection of 97 volumes of work
on polar exploration, the gift of theC
late Dr. Frank W. Smithies, '04M, to i LAST TIMES TODAY
the University, are being catalogued
at the general library preparatory to oANCHOR AWEIGH o
circulation here, library officials an-
nounced yesterday. AND AWAY WE 60
WITH A YO-HO-HO
AND A BARREL
DANCE FU .
MICHIGAN UNION
FRIDAY NIGHT
NOW SHOWING
wI 1
WALTER
WANGERSYBi JAON
SJANE BRYAN FRED LAWRENCE
DICK PURCELL " MARY tR EENS

Tomorrow, April 10, time-of-day

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