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March 30, 1937 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-03-30

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TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 30, 1937

. . . ...... .... a..,

NEWS
Of The DAY
(By The Associated Pres)
400 Sit-Down Strikers
Defy Court Injunction
DETROIT" March 29.-(P)-Ap-
proximately 400 sitdown strikers, in-
cluding 17 women, continued today
to defy a circuit court injunction
ordering them out of the plant of
the Square D company.
Relief Allotment
For County Is $17,000
LANSING, March 29.-VP)-Mich-
igan counties received a $1,474,2501
allotment from the Emergency Re-
lief Administration today to finance
relief work in April. The allocations
to counties included $17,000 for
Washtenaw.
Gandhi Hits British
Government 'By Sword'
MADRAS, India, March 30.-
(Tuesday) - (k) - Mohandas K.
Gandhi, the erstwhile Mahatma,
stepped to the front of India's po-
litical stage today with a statement
on the country's constitutional crisis.
Referring to the refusal of British
provincial governors to pledge that
they would not use the absolute veto
powers vested in them by the new In-
dian constitution, Gandhi said:
"Their rule now will be of the
sword, not of the pen or of the in-1
disputable majority."
ICla.ssified

Consumer Is Called 'Underdog' Speech Society
Who Requires Protective Action, Is To Present

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

Buyer Is Unable To Judge
Proper Value Of Goods
Closely,Horner Says
(Continued from Page 1)
Mr. Horner. Even if the individual
behaves intelligently in other re-
spects, he is often a poor consumer,
buying goods for which he has little
or no use, Mr. Horner said. This fact,
coupled with the attempt to 'keep up
with the Joneses' frequently resulting
in the purchase of high-priced ar-
ticles simply because the price is
high, is an important cause of mis-
directed consumption," he said.

in advertising was deplored by Mr.
Horner. "If one takes the trouble to
notice, he will see that compa atively]
few advertisements contain the key
bit of market information-the{
price," he said. "One vacuum clean-
er concern went as far as to instructI
its salesmen to keep from mention-
ing the price in the sales talk. If

Strike Debate
"Resolved that the sit-down strike
is a justifiable instrument of labor."
This is the moot question that
argumentative freshmen will attempt
to solve in the annual freshman de-
bate between Adelphi and Alpha Nu,
Tuesday night.

the purchaser inquired about the .i ireshmen teams ofth iC
cost of the cleaner, the salesmen were Nu national speech society, and the
instructed to drop their sales book Adelphi House of Representatives,
and in picking it up distract the at- local speech society, will meet on the
tention of the customer from the speaking platform Tuesday at 7:30
topic of price." p.m. for the 24th time in the Adelphi
Corn Cans Tested Room on the fourth floor of Angell
H l11

Unfair and unethical business Price does not always indicate
practices, however, were cited 'by quality, Mr. Horner added, so that
Mr. Horner as most significant causes when the customer does find out the
for the consumer's weak position. He price his problem is by no means
feels that the consumer is unable in solved. "Oranges have been often
many cases to determine for himself gassed or colored by some other ar-
on the basis of advertising claims tificial means," he said. "While
just what is and what is not worth this is not injurious to the consumer,
the price. it does afford a means of fooling the
Fear Is Advertising Motive customer into believing that the ar -
"Emotional advertising is a method ticle is of fancy goods.
in which the seller often tries to in- "An inspector for schools in Iowa
still a fear into the prospective cus- tested 65 cans of preserved corn the
tomer," he said. "For instance, cer- prices of which ranged from eight to
tain companies raise the spectre of 25 cents per can," Mr. Horner said.
'B.O.' and 'halitosis' in an effort to "One can was found to be of the so-
frighten the buyer into purchasing called "A' grade. This one had re-
something that he may or may not tailed at 17 cents. A half of the re-
need. A certain hand lotion company mainder proved to be of B grade and
told women that 'if your hands are the rest were of C grade. The B
rough, you can't get a man.'" grade corn ranged from eight to 25
SThe lack of information contained cents per can, with an average of 17
minus, and the C grade was in the
same price range, but with an aver-
D i rt tisor age price of 17 plus cents."

i an.
No one seems to recollect just when
these Adelphi-Alpha Nu debates be-
gan but, according to Dragon Mitro-
vitch, '38L, president of Adelphi, they,
were inaugerated shortly after the
founding of these organizations in
1857 and 1843 respectively. The
rivalry between the two over these
inter-society meets has always been
great and this is no exception, Mitro-
vitch said.
It was announced by Mitrovitch
that Alpha Nu will be represented by
a team composed of Louis L. Pop-
linger, '39L, Philip F. Westbrook, Jr.,
"40L and John L. Thornhill, '40L,
while Adelphi willbe represented by
Colvin L. Gibsoni, AOL, Sidney Da-
vidson, '40L, Jack A. Sessions, 40L,
and Sidney Friedman, 40, one of
whom will act as alternate. Glan
Mills, Ann Arbor High School Debate
ICoach has been selected to judge the
debate.

CKLW-1030 Kilocycles
!E P.M.
6 :00-"Magic Island."
6:15-News and Sports.
6 :30-Lane Prescott's Ensemble.
6:45-Enoch Light's Music.
7:00-Shadows on the Clock.
7:15-Michael Zarin's Orch.
7:30-Trans-Radio News Bulletins.
7:35-Freddy Berrens' Orch.
7:45-Howard Lanin's Orch.
8:00-Romance in Rhythms.
8:30-RickRoberts' Revellers.
9:00-Hugo Mariani's Orch.
9:15-Console and Keyboard.
9:30-Echoes of the Stage.
10:00-wallenstein's Sinfonietta.
10:30-"Poe's Tales."
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter.
11:15-String Ensemble.
11:30-Freddy Martin's Orch.
Midnight-Horace Heldt's Orch,
12:30-Red Norvo's Orch.
1:00-Hugo Mariani's Orch.
1 :30-Weather Forecast.
WJR-750 Kilocycles
P.M.
'6 :00-Stevenson News.
6:15-Envoys of Melody.
6:45-Pretty Kitty Kelly.
7:00-Poetic Melodies.
7:15-Diamond City News.
7:30-Alexander Woolicott.
7 :45-Boake Carter.
8:00-Hammerstein's Music Hall.
8:30-Al Jolson-Sid Silvers-Martha Raye
with Victor Young's Orch.
9:00-A1Pearce and His Gang.
9:30-Jack Oakie's College-with Benny
Goodman's Band-George Stoll's
Orch.
10:30-Musical.
10:45-Americana.
11:00-Headline News.
11:15-Peaceful Valley.
11:45-wismer Sports.
11:50-George Olson's Orch.
Midnight-Marvin Frederic's Cdrch.
12:30-Bob McGrew's Orch.
WWJ 920 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:00-Ty Tyson's Sport Talk.
6:10-Dinner Hour.
6 :30-Bradeast.
6:40-Odd Facts
6:45-C. Herbert Peterson.
7:00-Amos 'n' Andy.
7:15-Dramatic Moments.
7:20-Evening Melodies.
7:30-Dudley Brothers.
7:45-Piano Duo.

8:00-Leo Reisman's Orch.
8:30-Wayne King.
9 :00-Vox Pop.
9:30-Fred Astaire.
10:30-Jimmy Fidler.
4-0:45-Soloist.
11:00-Tonight's Hockey.
11 :05-Northwood Inn Club.
11:30-Dreams of Long Ago.
Midnight-webster Hall Orch.
12:30-weather.
WXYZ-1240 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:00-The Two Redheads.
6:15-The Fact Finder.
6:30-Day in Review.
6:45-Lowell Thomas.
7:00-Easy Aces.
':15-The Original Jesters.
7:30-The Green Hornet.
8:00-Log Cabin Dude Ranch.
8:30-Sweet Music.
9:00-Ben Bernie.
9:30-Husbands and Wives.
10:00-To Be Announced.
10:30-Ray Shields' Revue.
11:00-Paul Ash's Orch.
S11:30-Frankie Masters Orch.
Midnight--Morrey Brennan's Orch.

Boston Art Authority
Gives Lecture Today
Dr. Ananda K. Coomeraswamy of
the Boston Museum of Fine Arts,
outstanding authority of Far Eastern
art, will speak on the "Utility of Art"
at 4:15 p.m. today in the Natural
Science Auditorium.
Dr. Coomaraswamy is a iellow in
research in Indian, Persian, and Mu-
hammadan Art at the Boston Mu-
seum, and is recognized as the fore-
most interpreter of Eastern Art in
America. His best-known research
contributions are to the philosophy
of art in the Western continents, and
to the theory that Buddhist images
in the Orient are originally from In-
dia and not from a Hellenistic
source, as previously believed.
Among books that Dr. Coomara-
swamy has written are "The Dance of
Siva," "Rajput Paintings," and "A
History of Indian and Indonesian
Art."

PLAY PRODUCTION -THIS WEEK
at the Mendelssohn Theatre
SHAKESPEARE'S
"King Henry The Eighth"i
Wednesday through Saturday - Saturday Matinee

Wed. Thurs. Eves.
Sat. Mat.
35c - 50c - 75c

Friday - Saturday
Evenings
*50c - 75c - $1.00

BOX OFFICE
NOW OPEN
Phone 6300

ERROL
FLYNN in ..

Last Times Today
"GREEN LIGHT"

By LLOYD
C. DOUGLAS

.... _,.. ..e. _. __ .... ,

JELW ALAL: ML-/ W MJWJW" f

I

Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-3241.
'he classified columns closerat five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Bob numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance llc per reading line
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
ton basis of five average words to line)
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate= i1Stper reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
WANTED

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at a low price. 6x
NOTICES
LANDSCAPE GARDNER. Caretaker.
Box 15. 440
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black Parker pen with gold
band. Initials, K. B. Call 2-1981.
Terrace Garden
Dancing Studio
ln tractions i n a 11l
forms. Classical,nsocial,
dancing. Ph. 9695.
2nd Floor
Wuerth Theatre Bldg,

Special Meals
are beinag served
for the
Passover
Holidays

I

MATINEES
25C

Cd!TrnIThTI

NIGHTS
35c

DAILY 2:00 - 4:00 - 7:00 - 9:00
STARTING WEDNESDAY
Season's Most
Unusual Comed
ROLAND YOU 6

First You're up...then you'ke down.. ,that's love!

.,

CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
old and new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$5, $8, $25. LADIES' FUR COATS
TYPEWRITERS, OLD GOLD, and
musical instruments. Phone Sam.
6304. 78x

DELICATESSEN
RESTAURANT
233 SOUTH STATE STREET ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN

I-
CC
A Paramount Picture wih Charles Butterworth,
Thursday -
VICTOR Added
McLAGLEN "Pictorial" "In Old wyoming
"Nancy Steele Is Missing" NEWS

H. G. WELLS' COM[DY
~lmaa
- -
InAddition .- --
Popeye Cartoon "Rt
"My Artistical Rhythm On Nobody News Of
Temperature" The River" Home" The Day

A

11

I

/I _ _-

Y

i

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/ p

MAY

FESTIVAL

SIXCONCERTS-MAY 12,13,14,15
EARL V. MOORE, Musical Director
EUGENE ORMANDY and JOSE ITURBI
Orchestra Conductors
JUVA HIGBEE, Young People's Conductor

Earl V. Moore

Eugene Ormandy, Conductor

Jose TIturbi, Conductor

Ju va Higbee, Conductor

TEN FAMOUS STARS

KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD .
ELIZABETH RETHBERG
MARION TELVO

. . Soprano
. . Soprano
. .Contralto

Three Outstanding
Organizations
PHILADELPHIA SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
CHORAL WORKS

ARTHUR CARRON

. . . . Tenor

LAURITZ MELCHIOR

. . . Tenor
. . . Baritone

CARLO

MORELLI

EZIO PINZA .

. . . . . . Bass

JOSEPH KNITZER

. . Violinist

. .

VERDI'S "AIDA"
FOGG'S "SEASON'S"'
"SPRING RAPTURE" - Gaul
and
PARSIFAL EXCERPTS - Wagner
SEASON TICKETS: (Six Concerts) $6.00, $7.00, $8.00
Address, with remittance to cover: Charles A. Sink,
President, University Musical Society, Ann Arbor

EUGENE LIST .

Carlo Morelli, Baritone

. . . . . Pianist

Elisabeth Rethberg, Soprano

Lauritz Melchior, Tenor

PALMER CHRISTIAN

. Organist

; +.. ._ ..: :;;.. r'i. 1 u °. ..._ ro,. t is .:; ;; ;.- .. :_:. i s.' ..til ...; .; 'max .. ;_ I '

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