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March 21, 1937 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 21, 19:7

SUNDAY, MARUU 21~

I

Ormandy, Itur b
Will Be Festival
Guest Directors
Philadelphia Conductor
To Make His First Local
Appearance In Concerts
'Continued from Page 7)
a stroke, and won himself the per-
manent conductorship of the "Twin
City" orchestra.
Numemous Substitutions
Making his first professional ap-
pearance in Hungary last summer
since his accession to one of the most
important posts in the musical world,
Mr. Ormandy was summoned from
his vacation home near Salzburg to
take over the Bruckner performance
of the Danube Festival for Bruno
Walter, noted conductor, suddenly
stricken ill. Ormandy rushed to
Linz and won unanimous critical
acclaim for his performance of
Bruckner's symphonies. He was
thus recently signed to conduct the
Danube Festival at Linz, birthplace

of Anton Bruckner, to be held ti
year from July 16 to 21.
One of the leading exponents
the music of Bruckner, Mr. Orman
was last year awarded the Kilex

his
of
dy
nyi

I

Bruckner medal. The annual Aus-
;rian Danube Festival, offering music
by Bruckner, Beethoven, Mozart, and
Franz Schmidt, at Linz and St. Flor-
ian, is considered one of Europe's
great music ,festivals. Besides Mr.
Ormandy, who is the only visiting
conductor, Hans Weissback and Os-
wald Kabasta will conduct.
Leads 22 Weeks
Mr. Ormandy this year opened the
season of the Philadelphia Sym-
phony, and by the end of the season
will have led the orchestra in 22
weeks of its season. He will as well
conduct the majority of the con-
certs on the second annual coast-to-
coast tour of the orchestra, which
take the Philadelphia to leading cities
of the United States and Canada.
The busiest conductor of a major
orchestra, in addition to his other
activities, Mr. Ormandy has con-
ductor on a Sunday evening hour.
"Youth Concerts," and appeared
weekly on a coast-to-coast broadcast.
He will fly from various cities on tour
to make appearances as guest con-
ductor or on a Sunday evening hour.
He will use a plane to catch the

i

orchestra, which will continue on its
way during his absence.
Iturbi first attracted world atten-
tion as an orchestra leader when he
played 26 recitals in six weeks in
Mexico City. It was after this unique
experience that he definitely sup-
plemented his career as piano vir-
tuoso by accepting numerous orches-
tra engagements.
May Festivals
Offer Famous
List Of Chorals
The Seasons,' 'Parsifal'
'Spring Rapture' To Be
Included InProgram
Choral works have always formed
a vital part in the composition and
enjoyment of every May Festival pro-
gram, but few Festivals have ex-
ceeded this year's list of choral
works.
The principal choral work will be
the singing in concert form of Ver-
di's opera "Aida" by the University
Choral Union. This will be given at
the closing concert performance of
the Festival as the culminating fea-
tire of this year's program.
To Give American Premiere
Another choral work will also be
presented as an American premiere,
"The Seasons" by Fogg. This will
be offered by the Choral Union in the
Thursday evening concert.
Other choral works by the Choral
Union will be a group of scenes sung
from "Parsifal" by Richard Wagner,
which will be given Thursday eve-
ning.
The Young People's Festival Chor-
us will also contribute several choral
works of renown: a group of songs
by Arne, Schubert, and Scott, and
Gaul's cantata, "Spring Rapture.
These will be sung at the Friday
afternoon concert.
Imposing Works
The list of Choral works which
have been performed by May Fes-
tivals of former years has also
reached imposing proportions, and it
includes not, only world-famous
works whose fame has been perm-
anently established, but premiers of

Famous Artists To Gather Here For Concerts

EUGENE LIST LAURITZ MELCHIIOR
S * * * *

JOSEPH KNITZER
* * * '

Musical Series
To Last From
May12 to 15
Aggregation Of Stellatr
Artists And Philadelphia
Sytiiphony To Appear
(Continued ;fro11p
Tturbi will offer compositions of Beet-
hoven, Bruch, Ravel, CYilai ,d ,Gran-
ados, and deFalla.
Th'le final progr-am Satur-dayv nighlt,
May 15 will offer Guireppe Verdi's
opera '"Aidh." Miss Ehberg, Miss
Telva, Mr. Caron, Mr. Morelli, Mr.
Pinza, Mr. Christian, the Choral
Union, and the Philadelphia Sym-
phony Orchestra will participate in
this last presentation of the Festival.
Professor Moore will condict t he per-
formance.
The officers of the University Mu-
sical Society which is directing the
May Festival includes Charles A.
Sink, president of the School of
Music; President Ruthven; Durand
W. Springer; Levi D. Wines; Oscar A.
Eberbaach; Prof. Earl V. Moore of the
School of Music; Regent Juiius E.
Beal; Arnold 11. Goss; Harley A.
Haynes; James Inglis; Horace G.
Prettyman; and Shirley W. Smith.
Predicted By Sinlk
(Continued from Page 7
be filed and selections of locations
of seats will be made in sequence,
each person being given the location
as near as possible to that asked for
in the respective sections, it was ex-
plained.
Tickets will be mailed approxi-
mately May 1 at purchasers' risk un-
less an additional fee of 18- cents
for registration accompanies the or-
der, Mr. Sink warned. Tickets should
be addressed to Charles A Sink, pres-
ident, School of Music.
Holders of season tickets have
been further requested to detach the
coupon for each concert and pre-
sent these for admission instead of
therwhole ticket-

_._
_ _ .;.

NOT ICES

The right is reserved to make such changes
in the programs or in the personnel of par-tici-
pants as necessity may require. Tickets are
sold at purchasers' risks, and if lost, mislaid,
or destroyed in any manner, the University
Musical Society will not assume responsibility,
nor will duplicates be issued.
Concerts will begin on Eastern Standard time.
Evening concerts at 8:30 and afternoon con-
certs at 2:30.
Holders of season tickets are requested to
detach the proper coupon for each concert and
,present for admission (instead of the whole
ticket).
Concerts will begin on time, and doors will
be closed during numbers. Late comers will
be required to wait until admitted.
Lost and found articles should be inquired
for at the office of Shirley W. Smith, Vice-
President and Secretary of the University,
University Hall.
Those who leave the Auditorium during
intermission will be required to present their
ticket stubs in order to re-enter.
Traffic regulations will be enforced by the
Ann Arbor Police Department and the Building
and Grounds Department of the University.
For obvious reasons, notices will not be
announced from the stage.
Rehearsals are private, and listeners will

I

U

I I 1 1

ARTHUR CARRON VLIWAJRTHRETHBERG

4

EZIO PINZA

new works by famous composers.
The "Manzoni Requiem" by Verdil
has proved to be one of the most
popular choral works to be given
during the 44 years of the Festival's;
existence, and as a proof of its pop-
ularity, it was selected for the sixth
time to be presented at last year's
Festival. It was presented at the
first annual May Festival in 1894,
again in 1897, in 1913, 1921, 1930,
and finally in 1936.
Elgar's "Caractacus," the other

choral work which was heard at last
year's Festival, he also proved to be
a favorite with the choruses as well
as with the audiences.
Two years ago in the May Festival
world premieres of two important
choral works: Lear's "Jumblies," a
children's cantata, and Hanson's
"Drum Taps." In former years May
Festival concert-goers have heard
world premiers of Hanson's opera
"Merry Mount," his "Heroic Elegy,"
and Moore's "Voyage of Anion.'

Young Vocalists Given
Advice By Melchior
"Don't think only of singing. Be
interested in many other things."
This is the advice which Lauritz
Melchior, Wagnerian tenor of the
Metropolitan Opera Company, gave.
to young vocalists. "Don't be a sing-
er and nothing more, because if you
are a one-track person, you won't
be a singer. There must be feeling
as well."

EZIO PINZA

not be admitted.
An art exhibition will be conducted in
Alumni Memorial Hall during the Festival.
The Steinway is the official piano of the
University Musical Society.

The

1937
:S

IL

Commemorating the Centennial
Of The Establishment Of The University
In Ann Arbor

th hoetikt

I 1

ARTISTS

.r

GROUP~S

, '

KIRSTEN

FLAGSTAD

Soprano

.4.

ELISABETH RETHBERG

. . . ISoprano

MARION
ARTHUR

TELVA
CARRON

. . . c . Contralto
. . . Tenor

,

SEASON TICKETS

1-AIRITZ 1MELCHIOi

for six concerts by "Stars,"
chestra, are $3.00, $4.00,
holding Festival coupons;
and $8.00 for others.

Choruses, and Or
$5.00, for those
and $6.00, $7 00,

CARLO

R01ELL I

The
Philadelphia Orchestra
EUGENE ORMANDY & JOSE ITURBI
Conductors
The
University Choral Union
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
The
Young People's Festival Chorus
JUVA HIGBEE, Conductor

A

EZIO PINZA

0 a * Bas s

. 4

The prices of the individual concert tickets
will be $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, and $2.50.
SEND COUPON TODRY
----- -. ...--. -.-

ai r id

jOSEPF KNITZER .

m O0 4 Violinist

EUGENE

LIST

.A. . . . .gPianist
TIAN ....Organist

PALMER CHRISI

MR. CHARLES A. SINK
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Enclosed find remittance of $..
May Festival Tickets, as follows:
i-EASON TICKETS
(Six Concerts)

. ... ... for
SIN(&iC CONCERTS
N im bi
..Wed. Eve, at $......
..Thurs. Eve, at $......
......Fri. Aft. at $.........
Phi vp- a t t .. --

- '1

!k.

CHORAL WORKS.

......at $8.00 each $.......
......at $7.00 each $.......
......at $6.00 each $.......

AIDA**
THE SEASON
C' V"'" 1,"r /-N T1 A TWrrW9T 1 T" Y~

r r. aW~~ 7 % ERIC FOG

1 11

11 1 1

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