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March 18, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THUR.SDAY,

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY,

...tee.

Health Service Running Its Own
Unique, Specialized Pharmacy

Has Filled Prescriptions In
Over 17,000 Cases For
Student Illnesses
By HAROLD GARN
You would hardly recognize the
Health Service pharmacy as a drug
store because it is devoid of the usual
standard equipment. There isn't a
pin game, soda fountain, cigar coun-
ter or magazine stand within its walls,
but still it is one of the most popular
places on the campus.
During the first eight months of
the school year, 17,514 prescription
bottles and vials were filled and dis-
pensed, Arthur Gibson, pharmacist of
the Health Service, said yesterday.
"It is doubtful whether any other
college health service pharmacies of-
fer such extensive service as that of
Michigan's pharmacy," he declared.
"The pharmacy has grown very rap-
idly, from a few pine board shelves
and a part-time pharmacist, to the
place where it now employs four reg-
istered pharmacists, three of whom
are students working their way
through school who are employed on
a part-time basis."
Past Year Busy
The pharmacy not only fills pre-
scriptions, but supplies over 3,000
items a month to the Health Service
physicians, and these are dispensed
by the physicians to their student
patients, Mr. Gibson stated. The
pharmacy has filled a much larger
number of prescriptions this school
year than during the same period last
year, he said.
"An extensive prescription stock is
carried which enables the pharmacy
to compound practically any prescrip-
tions written by the Health Service
or University Hospital physicians," he
declared. "Where reasonably pos-
sible, the pharmacy will fill prescrip-
tions written by the student's home
physician. It is necessary, however,
to have the permission of one of the
Health Service physicians," he ex-
plained.
Stresses Savings
Few students consider the amount
of money that they save by being
able to have their prescriptions filled
at the Health Service, he asserted.
"Out of several hundred prescription
items, there are at present, about 38
expensive proprietory items and spe-
cialties that the pharmacy charges
for on a cost basis. These are such
that the pharmacy can exercise no
control over the cost, but must pur-
chase them from reliable pharma-
ceutical houses; such an item is in-
sulin. Among the specialties are a
few items prepared by the pharmacy
for conditions which are not urgent,
and because they are used in large
amounts we must charge a modest
fee," he stated.
"As a result of two years of ex-
perimental work, a radically new
method of manufacture of ointments
has been developed in the pharmacy
in cooperation with physicians," Mr.
Nordrheyer Announces
Bronson-Thomas Prize
The German department of the
University announces again the
Bronson-Thomas prize, an annual
award of $30 given on the basis of
a three-hour essay contest to be
held under the departmental super-
vision in the early part of April.

Gibson declared. "These ointments
are not obtainable elsewhere, and un-
like the older type of ointments are
practically greaseless, non-staining,
and will wash off very easily," he
said. "This new method of manu-
facturing ointments developed here,
takes advantage of the process of,
emulsification which results in oint-
ments that are stable, cream-like,
and greaseless. They should proveI
a boon to those who are compelled
to use this type of medication, and
it is hoped that we shall be able
to perfect the methods of manufac-
ture so that they will become avail-
able for use soon. For the conven-
ience of the user the material will
be dispensed in tubes," he explained.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)

Union pool at 9 p.m. Will all members
please attend.1
Men's Riding Class: The. Intramur-
al Riding Class for men will meet at
the Engineering Arch at 7:50 p.m.
today. Instruction offered, as usual.;
Independent Men: There will be al
meeting of all independent men, to
discuss the possibilities of organizing,t
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Room 116 of
the Union.
Harris Hall: Starvation Luncheon
for students from 12 to 1 p.m. today.
Harris Hall: Parish Fellowship
Dinner at 6:15 p.m. followed by the
last in the series of lectures given by
Rev. Henry Lewis on "Christian Fun-
damentals for a Confused World."

Coining Events
The English Journal Club meeting
previously announced for March 19
will be postponed until March 26 in
order not to conflict with the Michi-
gan Academy.
Esperanto: The Esperanto Class

Hillel Foundation: Dr. Isaacs will will meet in Room 1035 Angell Hall
lead the Fireside Discussion at 8:30 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Friday, March
p.m. today. The topic will be "Jewish 19.
Law and Customs."

Mr. C. M. Goodrich, Chief Engineer
of the Canadian Bridge Company of
Walkerville, Ontario, will talk on
Dogmatism and Structural Design on
Friday, March 19, at 4:15 p.m. in
boom 445 West Engineering Bldg.
Students in Structural Engineering
and Engineering Mechanics are es-
pecially invited. All others are wel-
come.
TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
Promptly and neatly done by expert-
enced operators at moderate prices.
0. D. MORRI LL
314 South State Street

Watch Repairing+
HALLER'S
Jewelry
State and Liberty

+{

P,

I

U

I

of Comedy and the music committee.
Professor Talamon will also speak
to the club.
Weekly Reading Hour: SelectionsI
from ancient oriental poetry will be
read by Professor Hollister today at
4 p.m. in 205 Mason Hall. The public
is cordially invited.
Aeronautical Engineers; L Ae. S.
Members: There will be a regular
meeting of the Institute this evening,'
in Room 1042 East Engineering Bldg.
D. C. Maier, chief engineer of the
Barkley-Grow Aircraft Corp., will be
the speaker. The inspection trip to
the Barkley-Grow plant at the De-
troit City Airport is scheduled for
Saturday, March 20, and further de-
tails of the trip will be discussed at
the meeting.' Members wishing to
make this trip are requested to sign
the list on the Aero. bulletin board.
Varsity Glee Club: Short rehearsal
at Hill Auditorium 4:30 to 5 p.m.
Meet in Glee Club Room at 7:15
p.m. in preparation for a short con-
cert for Lawyers' Association at 7:30
p.m. Hill Auditorium concert at 8:15
p.m.
Girls' Swimming Club: There will
be a regular meeting tonight at the

Win $5 or Two Weeks Free Board
Choose New Name For Restaurant
CONTEST RUNS FOR THE WEEK OF MARCH 22
Since Perry E. Norcross (present owner) is leaving Ann Arbor,
Perry's Boarding House at 3142 South State Street, over Morrill's
Typewriter Store, is-opening under new management.
The contest is open to anyone paying One Week's Board ($3.00
for 12 meals) at this restaurant. Only one entry may be submitted

4

for each meal ticket purchased.

Contest closes at 1:00 p.m., Friday,

March 26, 1937. The winning name will be chosen for its sim-
plicity and practicability. The entries will be judged by students.
JUDGES: ROBERT S. CAMPBELL, Grad.
LOWELL F. BAILEY, Grad.
K. L. HUSSEY, Grad.
W. D. BOSWORTH, '39 L.S.&A.
J. E. SPENS, '38 L.S. &A.

_____ -

Leslie Howard

says Luckies are

tops

with

his throat
ttYears ago, as an ambitious young
actor, I was impressed how well my
throat liked Luckies and how well
they suited my idea of a perfect
cigarette. That impression still
stands. Inmy recent tour of Hamlet',
with its many performances each
week and the attendant trax on my
throat, I have been convinced anew
that this light smoke is both delight-
ful to my taste and the top' ciga-
rette for an actor's throat."

4

STATIONERY
100 SHEETS $
100 ENVELOPES ..
Printed with your name and address
THE CRAFT PRESS
305 Maynard Street Phone 8805

ii
I

:1

EDITIONS DE LUXE
WONDERFUL VALUES
Dunbar - HISTORY OF TRAVEL IN AMERICA $2.95
DeKruif - MEN AGAINST DEATH . . . 149
LaWall - THE CURIOUS LORE OF DRUGS AND MEDICINE 1.79
Meier-Graefe - VINCENT VAN GOGH 1.49
Van Doren - MASTERPIECES OF AMERICAN POETRY 1.49
Cutler - GREYHOUNDS OF THE SEA . . . . . 1.98
Taylor - LEONARDO THE FLORENTINE .. . . .... 1.69
Winteric-h - GREAT BOOKS AND THEIR AUTHORS..... . . . . . 1.69
Williams - ANTHROPOLOGY OF CLASSIC CHRISTIAN LITERATURE 1.29
Kipliug - SELECTED PROSE AND POETRY 1.59
Cervantes - D9N QUIXOTE (Dore Illustration) 2.50
CHINESE ART, ROMANCE OF 1.98
Maughai - EAST IS WEST ... 1.49
KEATS AND SHELLEY, POETRY OF ..59
Halsey & Tower - HOMES OF-OUR ANCESTORS 2.39
Clendenning - THE wHUMAN BODY 1.49
Taylor - THE COMPLETE GARDEN 1.79

l u-n-.

~An independent survey was made recently
among professional men and women -lawyers,
doctors, lecturers, scientists, etc. Of those who said
they smoke cigarettes, more than 87% stated they
personally prefer a light smoke.
Mr. Howard verifies the wisdom of this pref-
erence, and so do other leading artists of the
radio, stage, screen and opera. Their voices are

their fortunes. That's

why so many of

them

smoke Luckies. You, too, can have the throat pro-
tection of Luckies-a light smoke, free of certain
harsh irritants removed by the exclusive process
THE F
it's Toasted". Luckies are gentle on the throat. "THE CR

INEST TOBACCOS-
EAM OF THE CROP"

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