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March 14, 1937 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE iMICHGAN DAILY

Office Wear Can Be Formal And Comfortablc

Although the spring season may
accentuate the trend toward informal
clothing, there are many men whol
feel, and quite rightly, that a degree
of formality shiould be preserved in
the office. While it is by no means
indicated that the formal type of
winter clothing should be retained
for business wear, it is possible to
maintain a formal character in one's
clothes during the warmer months
without making concessions to com-
fort:
The most satisfactory touch to a
formal outfit may be added by wear-
ing a starched white fold collar. This
type of collar is appropriate with
most types of suits, except rough
tweeds and shelands, and it is pos-
sible to give even quite casual cloth-
ing a business-like air of formality
by the addition of such, a collar.
Daxrk Ties Appropriate
Carefully polished black calf shoes
add a note of formality to an en-
semble, especially if they be on a,
conservative, good-looking, town last.
Dark ties are, of course, appropriate
with such ensemble, and it will be
noted that none of these accessories
will in any way detract from the
comfort of one's dress.
In the office scene shown at the
right, the gentleman is wearing a
comfortable oxford grey flannel suit
with white chalk stripes. This suit,
cut in a conservative three-button,
singlebreasted, peak lapel model, is
an ideal suit for business wear during
the warmer months. Its light weight
makes it pra tical on warmer days,
and its dark colo conveys an air of
formality most desirable in the busi-
ness office.
Collar Is Starched
With it is worn the white starched
collar previously mentioned. In ad-
dition to maintaining the formal air,
its starched- whiteness provides a
fresh note for the ensemble. The tie
is a dark Spilafields pattern with a
white stripe, and is in keeping with
the suit. The shirt, of a medium
blue shade, provides a note of color
and the handlkerchief matches this.
While flannallel and worsted flannel
are excellent fabrics for spring wear,
it must not be assumed that these
materials or worsteds need be re-
tained later in the year to maintain
a degree of formality. Dark colors
are now available in linens, Palm
Beach cloths and tropical worsteds,
and all of these lighter fabrics are
preferable for really hot days. In
the early spring, flannel and worsted
flnalle are ideal "liaison" officers be-
tween the heavier fabrics necessary
for cold winter days and the light-
weight suitings of the warmer
months. t

Easter Parade Calls
For Ultra Formality
While informality characterizes
most of the clothing for Spring, irre-
spective of whether it is town or
country kit that is being considered,
the one great exception is Easter Sun-
day. Upon this festive occasion, for-
mal day clothing makes its last gen-
eral appearance for the season.
The smartest model is the cutaway
coat. This is a one-button, peak lapel
coat without any braid. The waistcoat
is a double-breasted model of white
linen, and he wears dark trousers with
the widespaced chalk stripes so pop-
ular in London. A solid color shirt,
black satin tie, with a gold animal
figure stickpin, and a silk top hat
complete the ensemble. The gloves
are of yellow buckskin.
A less formal ensemble is a suitable
one for Easter Sunday in town. It
consists of a black chalk stripe suit
worn with a white waistcoat, shep-
herd's check tie, dark shirt, white
starched collar and dark grey hom-
burg hat.
A popular model is a single-breast-
ed, two-button, peak lapel one, but a
double-breasted jacket is equally cor-
rect. The trousers are of black and
white shepherd's check (striped trou-
sers are also smart with this en-
semble). A white linen waistcoat is
worn, a dark shirt, dark striped
Spitalfields tie, white starched collar
and a black homburg hat.
r
Best Of New
SringModels,
C1.1tiy n [1111 it( en u
In FToaswear
There have been ratifying ad-
'. iaces in almost every department of
the niaseuline wardrobe this year, but
none of them are more satisfactory
aci practical than those made in
men's shoes, especially those designed
for country wear. Below are shown
three new models, all of which are
definite improvements over their
brothers of recent years.
The topmost shoe in this group is
made of a special waterproof leather
with reversed welt. This special con-
struction at the sole prevents mois-
ture from getting into the shoe at its
most vulnerable point. The shoe is
made with a practical rubber sole and
includes hand-stitching at the blu-
cher overlap where the lacings are
placed. The overlap is sewn on in
such a manner that the body of the
shoe is not affected and remains im-
pervious to water. This shoe is de-
signed to be oiled rather than pol-
ished, but a satisfactory sheen is re-
tained by the excellent quality of the
leather.
Below it is shown a rugged reverse
calf blucher model with four eyelets.
This handsome country shoe has a
red rubber sole, and is ideal for
sportswear. It is also useful for deck
wear on shipboard, and it goes well
with almost any type of country
shoe but has a slightly different last.
It carries five eyelets, and is made in
a medium weight. Its sturdiness in
no way impairs the comfort to the
wearer. It is an excellent shoe for
all types of country wear and har-
monizes with nearly every type of
Spring ensemble.

Herringbone Is Harris Tweed Used
Smartest C o atFor Cold Spring Day

-Copyright, 1937, Esquire, Inc.
It is possible nowadays to main- is ,necessary without sacrificing one's patterns are available in fabrics of
am an air of -formality where it comfort, because formal colors and almost every weight.

._._.
r-

Good Neckties Deserve
Care And Attention
Good neckties deserve proper care,
N..,.,. but unfortunately very few people
know how to preserve their appear-
ance. Ties should never be placed
under an iron but should be moist-
ened with a damp clothand then held
against the face of a hot iron. This
removes the wrinkles satisfactorily.
Most reliable dry-cleaning estab-
lishments will recondition ties for a
T. very small charge, and it is a good
idea to take advantage of their serv-
ice. A tie that has been cleaned care-
fully will last much longer than one
that has been neglected. So good
treatment, especially of expensive
ties, is an economy in the long run.

_.. ,
..-
,/ ~ t , . ,a y . .,:
= ' y-

of Distinction

x

Sl

1102a

FOR THE MAN WHO CARES
Whether it is for Sport, Street, Business
or Dress wear we can correctly fit you in the
type of shoe you need at prices within the
reach of all.
The shoes illustrated on this page are some
of our best featured styles, including the saddle
type, the genuine moccasin pattern, and the
plain toe blucher model with the crepe sole.
In making these shoes no effort has been
spared to give you the best of everything money

can buy.

Unexcel led in quality, workmanship,

$1

50

* The smartness of these Topcoats is in their fine
fabrics and distinctive styling features. Such materials
as Shetlands, Llama, Tweeds, Twists, made in set-in
and raglan sleeves in half and full belts; also the pop-
ular Balmacaan model. Colors and patterns to suiftthe

style and comfort, they are truly incomparable
values in any price field.

most fastidious dressers.
OTHERS at $16.50

y
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