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September 22, 1936 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Nowomm" . 0

140

Freshmen In Big Rendezvous

Camp Program

SCA Sponsors
Tbree-m ay Camp
For Class Of '40
Frosh Caip Is Directed By
Cline, Wilsnack; Creates
Cooperation
Yost Greets Campers
Upperclassmen Counselors
Promote Discussions And
FacilitateFriendships
By JAMES A. BOOZER
More than 140 freshmen returned
to Ann Arbor Sunday afternoon af-
ter a three day session of the 11th
annual freshman Rendezvous Camp, 1
sponsored by the Student Christian
Association, at the University Fresh
Air Camp at Patterson Lake.
Directed by Justin Cline, '37 and
Wilsnack, '37, president of the SCA,
the camp had a two-fold purpose.
First, to create a cooperative, friend-
ly asociation of freshmen, faculty
and upperclassmen. Second, to pro-
vide a rapid and profitable adjust-
ment to the larger sphere of Uni-
versity life with its complexities and
strangeness.
Coach Fielding Yost was the first
of many speakers to address the new-
comers during the three day period.
He talked at dinner Friday evening,
and stirred the packed mess hall with
reminiscences of the "great old days"
of football, of the prominent players,
of personal incidents. As the group
gathered about the huge fireplace in
the Main Hall afterwards, Shirley W.
Smith, vice-president of the Uni-
versity, presented informally a re-
flective talk covering his early days on
the campus.
Upperclassmen, acting as counsel-
ors, facilitated the athletic and dis-
cussion programs, and helped in get-
ting the freshmen introduced. Each
counselor was in charge of a cabin
of approximately 10 men. They were:
Phil Gaston, '37; Roderic Howell,
'38M; Roger W. Howell, '36; Gilbert
Anderson, '36; Richard Clark, '37;
Howard Holland, 37; William
Barndt, '37; Charles Roach, '39; Nel-
son Fuson, Grad.; James Boozer, '39;
Fred Emens, '39; Ralph Segalman,
'37; Walter Luszki, '38; John Sher-
man, Sp.; Ralph Erlewine, '39; Shirrel
Kasle, '37; Thomas Draper, '39;
Charles Dolph, '39; William Parkin-
son, '39; Earnest Jones, '37;
Camp advisers were Dr. E. W.
Blakeman, Counselor in Religious Ed-
ucation and Ira M. Smith, Registrar.
Baseball games, swimming meets,
football contests were intersperced
with group discussions on various
campus activities and problems that
might rise in connection with college
life. Each day began at 7 a.m.
Fraternities Show
Surplus For Year

Mystic Feat Of Levitation Old
Stuff To Many Ann Arborites

Power Of Coordination
And Suggestion Basis
Of Experiment
By WILLIAM C. SPALLER
The feat of levitation which has
had metropolitan dailies and their
readers agog for the last few days is
old stuff to most Ann Arborites.
The "feat," as many here will re-
call, beginswith the subject sitting
in an armless chair. Four persons
then gather around and place their
hands, oneafter the other, on top of
the subject's head who sits with his
arms folded in front of him. The
most successful way is to count in
unison while placing the hands on
the head.
When all the hands have been
placed there, they are then with-
drawn and the performers place their
index fingers together and put them
under the armpits and just above the
knee-joints of the subject. A little
pressure is applied and up he goes
with surprising ease.
'Power of Suggestion'
It is all the more effective if the
operators are first allowed to try it
without the advantage of placing
their hands on the subjects head. It
invariably results in failure.
The stunt, an old favorite here, has
aroused more than passing interest
and much mystification wherever it
has been introduced. But to Uni-
versity psychologists there is nothing
baffling about it.
The experiment is based on a com-
bination of the power of suggestion
and coordination, states Dr. Robert R.
Dieterle, assistant professor of psy-
chiatry in charge of psychotherapeut-
ic service at the University Hospital.
"It is one of the most striking ex-
amples of the power of suggestion
that I have seen for some time," Dr.
Dieterle said.
"The success of thestunt depends
primarily on the ability of the oper-
ator to convince his assistants, first,
that the task is harder than it really
is, and, second, that itis easier than
the apparent failure, if previously
Realize Plan
For Religious
Degree Course
A new inter-departmental degree
program in religious education, in-
stituted this year, completes a tri-
partite program of University relig-
ious activity which for many years
has been the hope and the plan of
campus religious interests.
Believing that religious education
might better be promoted through
existing departments of the Univer-
sity, rather than through the creation
of a separate school, faculty members
have cooperated to form a course
of subjects in the departments of
philosophy, psychology, Greek, Latin,
history, Oriental languages, anthro-
pology, and sociology, and in the
education school, which contribute to
religious development.

tried without placing the hands on
the head, would indicate."
This laying on of hands,' Dr. Diet-
erle said, serves a double purpose.
"It concentrates the attention of the
four lifters and it induces a rhythm
which permits complete cooperation,
much as the old sea chantey induced
coordination of muscular effort in
pulling on a rope. There are, in plac-
ing the eight hands and in withdraw-
ing them, 16 evenly-spaced beats. The
withdrawal of the last hand is prob-
ably the signal, communicated to all,
to 'heave ho!'
Cannot Decrease Weight
"We must always consider the pos-
sibility that suggestion is capable of
releasing some of the rarely used re-
serve stores of energy, both physical
and mental, which every individual
possesses. It would not surprise me
to find that this particular experi-
ment would permit the lifting of
much greater weights.
"The spectacle of a maniac bend-
ing iron bars-a feat impossible in
calmer moments-is familiar to many
who have been associated with insti-
tutions for the insane. Then there are
such classic examples of the potency
of suggestion in hysterical states as
that of the 16-year-old girl who lifted
a small automobile, by its front axle,
off her younger brother who was
pinned beneath the wheels."
Dr. Dieterle does not believe that
the subject can assist in any way.
"He can not decrease his weight at
will by any kind of superhuman ef-
fort. The law of gravity is still un-
repealed.
"The experiment of raising a sub-
ject from his chair should be re-
peated with four operators who are
given no suggestion but who are
merely told, step by step, what they
are to do and never what is likely or is
not likely to occur," Dr. Dieterle said.
"In all probability they will either
raise the subject easily at the first
trial or, if they fail, will also fail on
succeeding trials."
BULLETIN
TUESDAY, SEPT. 22, 1936
VOL. XLVII No. 1
Notices
To Users of the Daily Official Bul-
letin: The attention of users of The
Daily Official Bulletin is respectfully
called to the following:
(1) Notice submitted for publica-
tion must be Typewritten and must
be signed.
(2) Ordinarily notices are pub-
lished but once. Repetition is at the
Editor's discretion.
(3) Notices must be handed to
the Assistant to the President, as
Editor of the Daily Official Bulletin,
Room 1021 A.H., before 3:30 p.m.
(11 Saturdays).
Band: Smoker at Union Thursday,
Oct. 24 at 8 p.m. All students in-
terested are invited.
La Verne Noyes Scholarships: All

students who intend to apply for La-
Verne Noyes Scholarships are urged
to present their applications at once.
Application forms may be obtained
from the undersigned at 1021 Angell
Hall. Only veterans of the World
War and their blood descendants are
eligible.
Frank E. Robbins.
The Automobile Regulation will be-
come effective at 8 a.m. on Monday
morning, Sept. 28. All students who
anticipate the need of driving priv-
ileges are urged to file applications
without delay at the Dean of Stu-
dents Office, Room 2, University
Hall. Those students entitled to ex-
emption from the ruling are likewise
requested to register their'cars and
secure exemption permits at their
earliest convenience.
Part-Time Students in the College
of Literature, Science and the Arts.
Permission to register one part time
must first be secured either from the
Dean (Room 1210 A.H.) or from the
Assistant Dean (Room 1220 A.H.).
Hillel Foundation: Students de-
siring to affiliate with Hillel may do
so at the Foundation, corner East
University and Oakland, from 10 to
12 and 2 to 5 every day.
Membership in Hillel entitles you to
all religious, social and educational
privileges, including admission to
Yom Kippur services.

Tuesday: Journalism 107, Creative
Writing. Professor Haines. 1209 An-
gell Hall. 7 p.m.
Wednesday: Mineralogy 32, Gems
and Gem Materials. Professor Slaw-
son. 2082 Natural Science Bldg. 7
p.m.
Thursday: Business Administration
206, Business Law. Professor Wol-
aver. 1020 Angell Hall. 7 p.m.
Speech 53, Elements of Play Pro-
duction. Dr. Halstead. 4203 Angell
Hall. 7 p.m.
University Extension Division.
Insurance Courses:. The following
sequences of courses will be offered in
the School of Business Administra-
tion this year: in the first semester,
Principles of Insurance (Course 171),
3 hours credit, T Th S at 11; in the
second semester, Casualty and Com-
pensation Insurance (Course 172), 1
hour credit, and Life Insurance Prob-
blems (Course 174), 1 hour credit. Mr.
Hampton H. Irwin, Non-Resident
Lecturer will be in charge in the ab-
sence of Prof. Ernest M. Fisher.
Courses are open to students in the
School of Business Administration
and to those in other units who have
at least fourth year standing and the
consent of the instructor.
Lecture
University Lecture: Sir Joseph Bar-
croft, Professor of Physiology in
Cambridge University, England, will
lecture on the subject "The Origin of
Respiratory Movements in Foetal
Life" on Thursday, Oct. 1, 1936, at
4:15 p.m. in the Natural Science Au-
ditorium. The lecture will be il-
lustrated with moving pictures. The
public is cordially invited.
University Lecture: V. Gordon
Childe, B. Lit., Professor of Prehis-
toric Archaeology at the University
of Edinburgh, Scotland, will lecture
on the subject "The Early Civiliza-
tion of the Indus Valley" on Monday,
Oct. 5, at 4:15 p.m. in Room D, Al-
umni Memorial Hall. The lecture

will be illustrated with slides. The
public is cordially invited.
The Men's Council will meet at
7:30 p.m. tomorrow on the third floor
of the Michigan Union.

Academic Notices

Extension Courses: The following
extension classes meet for the first
time this week. These courses are
not open to students regularly en-
rolled in the University.
Monday: English 160, Shakespear-
ean. Prof. Mueschke. 3231 Angell
Hall. 7 p.m.
German 2. Mr. Graf. 3212 Angell
Hall. 7 p.m.
Speech 31, Practical Public Speak-
ing. Professor Brandt. 4203 Angell
Hall. 7 p.m.

For HEALTH
Our
GOLDEN JERSEY MILK
Ann Arbor Dairy Corp*
121 East Catherine St. Phone 4101
Il---~~ --~--_________- - -

r®wrr+rrri® rrrrs ow a urMrrg or rr
__.. .___.__ -...------------" I

BE PREPARED

with

"FOOD FOR THOUGHT"

at

Kruger's Delicatessen
and Restaurant,
233 S. State St., at Head of Liberty St.

lI

THE GROOMWELL BEAUTY SALOON

I

cAnn ounces

(Continued from Page 1)

that the fraternities are conscious of
their problem and realize that they
must pay their own way. "Without
this realization rules would be use-
less," he said.
Increased attention from national
officers of the fraternities has also
helped in bringing about the $15,700
rise from the red that has taken
place in the last two years, Professor
Briggs stated, for there have been
more visits by national officers to Ann
Arbor in the past year than ever
before. Alumni in many instances
have aided fraternities, too, he said.
Proposed to keep fraternities open,
the Fraternity Financial Standards
Exceptions Committee also has the
power to close them if they have
more= than $200 in receivable ac-
c.ounts by July 1, or if they exceed
$500 in unpaid payable accounts July
1. It was the efforts of this com-
mittee thattwere characterized last
year by dean of men Joseph A. Bur-
sley as an attempt to "help houses
help themselves."
STROH'S
PABST BLUE .RIBBON
FRIAR'S ALE
At All Dealers
J. J. O'KANE, Dist. Dial 3500

b==

-,I

THE OPENING OF ITS SECOND SHOP
... NEW and MODERN. . . AT 1205
SOUTH UNIVERSITY... SO THAT WE MAY
OFFER YOU A FINER SERVICE . . .

LEARN
TYPING and SHORTHAND
Without them a student is like a chicken in water.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE

Personality Haircutting by Mr. Julian

1205 5. UNIVERSITY
DIAL 4818

615 E. LIBERTY
DIAL 3773

William at State

Phone 7831

Watch Us Grow,

~ 1~

Our first anniversary!
Headquarters for campus pho-
tography. Drop in often and let
"Bob" and "Herb" Gach provide
your camera needs.
Commercial Photography
Miniature Camera Experts
Camera Supplies & Accessories

STUDENTS! Plan to spend
your spare time at the
GOLFSIDE RIDING
ACADEMY, Inc.
Geddes and River Road
Phone 2-3441 and our car will call for you.
ROBERT C. KENNEDY, Mgr.

I

&

JOHN and RALPH

I

Robert L. Gach Co.

. a

THE PRETZEL BELL
120 East Liberty Street

The Camera Shop in the Arcade

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