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January 29, 1937 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAC~E SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JAN. 29, t937

____________________________________________________________________________________________ I I

i I

State-By-State
Flood Summary
(By The Associated Press)
(Kentucky)
Known dead, 225. Homeless, 347,-
000.
Louisville-Four story department
store, covering half a city block, sag-
ged. Troops, fearing collapse, roped
off area. Cracks appeared on outer
surfaces of 18-story hotel and nine-
story building. Underground water
pressure buckled several paved
streets. Death toll set officially at
200.
Paducah-Ohio rising with crest of
60 to 61 feet expected in several days.
Fifteen thousand refugees departed.
Red Cross urged other residents to
leave flood-washed town.
Carrollton-Water reached second
floors of business structures. Boats
moved ill refugees to temporary hos-
pital at Owenton.
(Illinois)
Knowndead, 11. Estimated home-
less, 50,000.
Cairo-Threatened by Ohio and
Mississippi rivers, deserted by 8,000
persons. Four thousand remaining-
mostly men-completed three-foot
bulkhead atop 60 foot seawall. Ohio
up past 58 feet with crest of 62 feet
expected by Sunday. Lone highway
only means of egress.
Harrisburg-Gas and water cut off
as Ohio backwater rose. Looting re-
ported. Boats sole means of trans-
portation. WPA assigned 15,000 work-
ers to menaced levees.'
(Ohio)
Known dead, 14. Estimated home-
less, 250,000.
Cincinnati-Restoration of 15,000
flooded homes and buildings in me-
tropolitan area planned to start in
several days. Ohio inched back to-
ward its banks. Damage estimated
$10,000,000 to $15,000,000.
Portsmouth-Flood waters slowly
receded. Thirty thousand occupied
makeshift quarters on hills.
(Indiana)
Known dead, 9. Estimated home-
less, 75,000.
Evansville-Thirty-five thousand
residents of west portion of city vir-
tually isolated when Pigeon Creek
engulfed connecting bridge.
Seaplanes brought in vaccine.
Damage estimated at $16,000,000.
Jeffersonville-Virtually deserted.
Reconstruction surveys planned in
all river towns on southern border.
(Tennessee)
Known dead, 10. Estimated home-
less, 125,000.
Memphis-Tension of Mississippi
valley residents eased by meteorolo-
gist's prediction river would crest at
48 feet here by Feb. 5-7. This would
be three feet above any previous stage
but five feet under previously esti-
mated peak. River rose more than
six inches to beyond 44 feet.
Tiptonville Workmen strove to
save dike.
(Missouri)
Known dead, 17. Estimated home-
less, 41,000.
New Madrid-Ohio flood swelled
Mississippi. Exodus on. Most of
stores closed. New Madrid-Birds
Point Spillway-131,000 acre safety
reservoir-filled rapidly. with water
being diverted to save Cairo.
(Arkansas)
Known dead, 25. Estimated home-
less, 75,000.
Mellwood-National Guard planes
dropped warning notes to residents
of this vicinity threatened by crumb-
ling Mississippi River Levee. Sol-
diers moved thousands from low-
lands.
Cummins-State prison farm dis-
patched 935 prisoners and three car-
loads of farm implements to aid huge
force building defenses along Mis-

Claims G ble As Dad

Final Ex-Ifl-n-ittalioll Schedule.p,

College of
School of
Business A
Exam
Group
Letter
A
B
C
D'
E
F
G
I-I
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R

First Semester, 1936-37
Literature, Science and the Arts, School of
Music, School of Forestry and Conservation,
Administration, and Graduate School.

Education,
School of

Time of Exercise
To be used only
in case no
group letter is listed

Time
of
Exam

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Special
Special
Special
Special

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday,
Friday,
Wednesday.
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Thursday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
Saturday,
Saturday,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.I
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.;

8,
5,
3,
1,
9,
9,
8,
2,
3,
2,
10,
5,
4,
4'
6,
6,
30,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5

ROTC Reveals
Promotiions A t
Winter Revi ew
Lt. Col. Frederick E. Rogers, com-
manding officer of the University
R.O.T.C. unit, yesterday ordered ap-
pointments and promotions, to take
effect the second semester, at the
winter review of the local unit held
in Waterman gym.
Capt. F. E. King, '37E, was promot-
ed to major and assigned to the 1st
Battalion. This was the highest post
awarded.
First Lieut. D. J. Parry, '38BAd, was
promoted to captain and assigned to
Headquarters Company, 3rd Bat-
talion, as was Second Leiut. C. W.
Campbell, '37, who was assigned to
Headquarters Company, 1st Bat-
talion.
The following were named first
lieutenants: second Lieut. E. L.
Bjork, '37, and Second Lieut. R. L.
Kinball, '37.
Sergeants who were raised to the
office of second lietuenants are C.
W. Carle, Jr.. '37; D. D. Eisendrath,
'38; K. G. Emery, '37; G. J. Gary, '37;

H. C. Janura, '37; J. A. Margwarth, C. E. Scovern, '37; C. S. Lurie, '37;
'37; C. F. Jayton, '37; C. J. Ryan, '37;C. H. Schramm, '37E.

superior.
MILK-ICE CREAM
Week-End Special
TWO-LAYER BRICK
VANILLA and FRUIT DeLuxe
Superior Dairy Company
Phone 23181

-Associated Press Photo
The mother of 13-year-old
Gwendolyn Edith Norton (above)
was held in jail at Los Angeles on
a charge of attempting to extort
money from Clark Gable, movie
star, by declaring him to be the
father of the child.
DAIL OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
at 11 MWF in the second semester,
Room 3043 N.S. Forestry 31, "Intro-
duction to Forestry," Young, will
meet at 9 MWF, Room 4054 N.S. Each
of these non-professional courses car-
ries 3 hours credit and each is open
to students in several of the schools
and colleges of the University other
than the School of Forestry and Con-
servation, with consent of the respec-
tive deans.
Psychology 31, Lecture Section I:
Final examination, Tuesday, Feb. 9,
2-5. Students whose last names be-
gin with A through G, go to Room B
Haven Hall; H through Q, Room C
Haven Hall; R through Z, Room 103
Romance Language Building.
Psychology 39, second semester:
Lecture MWF at 10, 3126 N.S.; lab-
oratory, Section 1, Tu., 2-4; Section
2, W, 2-4. 300 W. Med. instead of
as announced in the catalogue.
Premedical and Science Students:
None of Dr. Lee's several French and
German Scientific Reading Courses
nor Sociology 187 (advanced course
in the History of Medicine) will be
given in the second semester.
Concerts
Organ Recitals: Recitals will be
given on the Frieze Memorial Organ
in Hill Auditorium at 4:15 p.m. on
the following dates. The general
public, with the exception of small
children, is invited without admission
charge.
Palmer Christian (Bach recital) .
.Sunday, Jan. 31
Arthur Poister (guest organist) ...
. ...............Wednesday, Feb. 17
E. William Doty . Wednesday, Mar. 3
Palmer Christian ................
........... ..Wednesday, March 10
Palmer Christian ................
.......Wednesday, March 17
Palmer Christian (Good Friday
Program) ........Friday, March 28
Palmer Christian (Bach recital) ..
................Sunday, April 25
Lectures
University Lecture: Dr. Olaf Hel-
mer, of Berlin, will lecture on "The
Logical Foundations of Mathematics"
in 1025 Angell Hall at 4:15 p.m. to-
day. The public is cordially invited.
Under the auspices of the Hopwood
Committee Robert P. Tristram Coffin
lectures on "What Poems Are and
How I Make Them," today

VIA

1a

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Jan. 30 to Feb. 10, 1937
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time
of Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only. -the Time of Exercise is the time of the
first quiz period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to
such work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned
examination periods should be reported for adjustment to Professor
J. C. Brier, Room 3223 East Engineering Building before Jan.
27. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should
receive notification from his instructor of the time and place of his
appearance in each course during the period Jan. 30 to Feb. 10.
No single course is permitted more than four hours of exami-
nation. No date of examination mpay be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee.

Time of Exercise
Monday at 8
Monday at 9
Monday at 10
Monday at 11
Monday at 1
Monday at 2
Monday at 3

Time of Examination
Monday, Feb. 8 8-12
Friday, Feb. 5 8-12
Wednesday, Feb. 3 8-12
Monday, Feb. 1 8-12
Tuesday, Feb. 9 2-6
Monday, Feb. 1 2-6
Tuesday, Feb. 9 8-12

three-act play, "They Too Arise," will
be held today at 7 p.m. at the Hillel
Foundation is located at E. Univer-
sity and Oakland.
Many parts have not yet been cast,
and everyone is eligible' to tryout.
Those who have already appeared,
should come back for the final cast-
ing.
Coming Events
All women students who are in-
terested in playing club basketball
next semester, and have played two
or more seasons, get in touch with
Norma Curtis at Helen Newberry.
Phone 2-2591.
The Motion Picture Producers and
Distributors of America, Inc., Com-
munity Service Division, will present
a free showing of films selected for
their value in presenting individual
and social problems for group dis-
cussion, on Saturday morning, Jan. 3G
from 10 to 12 o'clock in the Michigan
Theatre. Mr. Irving I. Deer, form-
erly active on the Committee on So-
cial Values in Motion Pictures, of
which Dean Howard M. Le Sourd of
Boston University is chairman, will
answer questions concerning the use
of these films in community groups.
All interested are invited to attend.
Inter-Faith Symposium: The third
meeting of the Inter-Faith Sympo-
sium will be held on Sunday, Feb. 28,
instead of Feb. 14, from 3 to 5 p.m. I
Everyone is invited.
or
lowers

p

I

3

Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday, Feb. 8
Tuesday, Feb. 2
Wednesday, Feb. 3
Tuesday, Feb. 2
Wednesday, Feb. 10
Friday, Feb. 5
Thursday, Feb. 4
*Saturday, Feb. 6
"Saturday, Feb. 6
'Thursday. Feb. 4
*Saturday. Jan. 30
*Thursday, Feb. 4
.Tuesday, Feb. 9

E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 2
Surv. 1, 2, 4; German
M.E. 3; French; Draw. 1, 2
E.E. 2a; Met. Proc. 2, 3, 4;
Spanish
Economics
Drawing 3

2-6
2-6
2-6
8-12
8-12
2-6
8-12
8-12
2-6
2-6
2-6
8-12
8-12
there is no con-

-HOP
JEWELRY D
IT is less than two weeks until
the big dance . . . and not too
early to pick your formal cos-
tume jewelry from our new
stock of Rhinestone, Crystal, and
natural gold creation.
*
On display now at
cArcade Jeweler
CARL F. BAY
Jewelers in the Arcade since 1916

U'
(A

*This may be used as an irregular period provided
flict with the regular printed schedule above.

at 8:15 p.m., in Lydia Mendelssohn to 5 p.m. except Sunday through the
Theatre. Tickets on sale at Wahr's, month of February. Illustrated lec-
the Hopwood Room, 3227 Angell Hall, ture to be announced. The public is
and the Theatre Box Office. cordially invited.

Exhibitionsa
Exhibition, Architectural Build-
ing: Photographs of work of artists
in the fields of painting, sculpture,
architecture, and landscape archi-
tecture, secured through the College
Art Association of New York from
the Alumni Association of the Ameri-
can Academy in Rome, are being
shown in the third floor Exhibition
Room. Open daily, 9 to 5, except
Sunday, through 'Jan. 30. The pub-
lic is cordially invited.
An Exhibition of Chinese Art, in-
cluding ancient bronzes, pottery and
peasant paintings, sponsored by the
Institute of Fine Arts, at the Archi-
tectural Building. Open daily from 9

Esperanto: The Esperanto class
will meet in Room 1035 Angell Hall
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. today.
Hillel Foundation: Friday evening
services will be held at 8 p.m. A stu-
dent will officiate as cantor. The
Foundation, corner of Oakland and
East University.
Hillel Players: Final tryouts for the

PHONE 9690
106 East Washington Street
Member of
FLORIST TELEGRAPH
DELIVERY

I

i

sissippi.
(Mississippi)
Known dead, 3.
less, 4,500.
National Guard
stand by for flood
(West Virginia)

i1

Estimated home-
units ordered to
duty.

Known dead, 13. Estimated home-
less, 64,000.
Wheeling-City council estimated
$100,000 would be. needed for street
clearance as Ohio moved back to
banks. WPA and CCC workers start-
ed cleaning flood debris from 8,000
homes.
By ARBOR SPRINGS
CARE!

The safety campaign has be-
come a national institution. It
is the duty of every true Ameri-
can to support it, not only in
theory, but in practice at all
times. Obey traffic lights and
regulations. Join the legion of
safe drivers and make oui
streets and highways safe for
all.
It is safe to say that the pure
water furnished by the Arbor
Springs Water Co., 416 West
Huron, is the, most refreshing
and healthful drink you can
take. Start today to enjoy its
good effects. Phone 8270 for a
case of 6 2-qt. bottles or a large
5-gallon bottle.

NEW STYLES FI
Bea 'Wild Mar
at the Hop!
A Complete Stock of
Full Dress and Double-
Breasted Tuxedoes
Midnight Blue
$29.50 - $35.00
KNOX TOPPERS
$15.00
FREEMAN DRESS SHOES
$6.00
ARROW DRESS SHIRTS
Swank and Hickok

RST AT W ILD'S

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